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Full text of "Aggie life"

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LIBRARY 



OF THE 




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This book may be kept out 

TWO WEEKS 

only, and is subject to a tine of TWO 
CENTS a day thereafter. It will be due on 
the day indicated below. 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium IVIember Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/aggielife11mass 







Sept. 19, 1900 



5. 







L. XI. 



NO. 1. 



CLOTH I NO FURNISH IN OS. 



We sell Clothing — Good Clothing — the best we can buy. We sell it as low 
as good clothing can be sold. We sell lower than some dealers because we sell 
for cash only, and thus have no losses. We also sell Furnishing Goods and Hats. 
The newest of new styles, and everything is guaranteed to be right. AGGIE 
MEN — we ask a share of your patronage — all you can give us. We will try and 
treat you right. 

Sic U'. ^^.I^JVl^ODK^O^^O. 



J. P. 



My stock of Woolens for this season includea the 
Latest Novelties and are the very best goods made. 
Call and examine them and get my prices. 

MILITARY SUITS A SPECIALTY 

^^ All suits made in my own work-shops. ^^3 

Hunt's Block, - Amherst, Mass. 



An eiitirely new stock of Pipes. 



The very latest styles just received. 

A new and fresh stock of Tobaccos— all the best brands. 

All the popular brands of American Cigarettes. 

Hoflfmaa House and Le Roi little Cigars. 
Twenty brands of Turkish Cigarettes— all new. 



Sole agent for Huylers Candies. 



DEUEL'S AMHERST HOUSE DRUG STORE, 



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Winter Russet Shoes, $2, $2.^0, $j, $J.^o. 
Patent Leathers, $2.^0 to $^.00. 



REIRAIRflMO.^ 



New Soles and Heels, 75c. 

NEXT TO POST OFFICE. 

Wedding and Engagement Rings 

in approved forms. 
PRICBS RIGHT. 



COLLEiE 
JEWELER 



JEWELER 



Skilled workmen i^i our repair department. 

4®-EYES FITTED rREE<®Sr 
By a graduate of Dk. Fostek, Occulist. 



I have the ammunition to, fit 
you with. On your way to the 
Post Office stop and look at my 
stock of 

Hats, Caps, Gloves, 

DRESS SHIRTS, 
FOOT BALL GOODS, 




Kjw^ 



COXjIj-A-rtS 



ooniLEcs-E oi:ji':fi'X"I'e:es, 

UNDER THE HOTEL. 



AQQIE LIFE. 



VOL. XI. 



AMHERST. MASS., SEPTEMBER 19, 1900. 



NO. 1 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will be sent 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

- CLARENCE EVERETT GORDON, 1901, Editor-in-Chief. 
NATHAN DAVIS WHITMAN, 1901, Business Manager. 

^ LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, 1902, Assistant Business Manager. 
CHARLES LESLIE RICE, 1901, Athletics. JAMES HENRY CHICKERING, 1901, Library Notes. 

THOMAS CASEY, 1901, Alumni Notes. - HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT, 1902, Exchanges. 

CHARLES MILTON KINNEY, 1902, College Notes. ARTHUR LINCOLN DACY, 1902. 

CLIFFORD ALBION TINKER, 1903. NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN, 1903. 

Terms: $1.00 per year in adcance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside of United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 

LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

G. R. Bridgeforth, Pres. .Athletic Association, 

C. L. Rice, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

J. H. ChickeringSec. Nineteen Hundred and Two Index, 

Reading-Room, C. T. Leslie, Secretary. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot-Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
Y. H. Canto, Manager. 
J. C. Hall, Manager. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



Edi-torials. 



Believing that the Military Department is one of 
the strongest features of the college, and a most 
potent factor in advertising it, we have been led to 
publish in full the report of the inspector who visited 
us last June, that people who read may learn more of 
what we are doing along these lines. The report in 
tofo may be found on another page of this issue. 



Let no premature graduation without honors enforce 
this truth upon you, for you will learn to love these 
walls, and will be reluctant to leave them. 



The Life extends its greeting to the members of 
the entering class. We welcome you in our midst as 
brothers, past indications to the contrary, notwith- 
standing, and as co-workers with us in the commu- 
nity. We are desirous that your college life may be 
pleasant, and so it will be if you wisely follow 
the salutary advice which we as your seniors wish to 
extend. Expect no more than your due, and follow to 
the letter that excellent precept which will never be 
more applicable to your life than now : Take care of 
the present and the future will take care of itself. 



With the close of summer many a happy camp on 
the border of lake or river was broken, and long sighs 
expressive of no mild regret for the halcyon days that 
were no more, were breathed as trappings were packed 
for the homeward journey. Now, only the memory 
can comfort, but happy are they in whom a single 
thought awakens the pleasant memories of such happy 
days. The return of autumn brings us back again to 
old, delightful Amherst. We greet again old faces 
grown dear.through the associations of other days. In 
the rush and excitement of the first week we forget the 
summer gone, but soon again the memories throng, the 
longings beset, and 

" Tears, idle tears, I know not what they mean, 

Rise in the heart, and gather to the eyes, 
In looking on the happy autumn fields, 
And thinking of the days that are no more." 



X'^o^) 



AGGIE LIFE. 



The football season is on. Soon everywhere 
throughout the country colleges, academies and high 
schools will have their teams in the field, and college 
interest shall seek no other aim than the success of 
the football team. The knowledge that others are 
striving to beat us should spur us on to good, hard 
work. We have a record to make or to break this 
year. Time will tell, but so will faithful work. The 
spirit is fine ; let's keep it up. It means more to us 
than ever before that interest shall not lag. It means 
more to us this year to make an excellent showing, 
than in the past it has meant to win. We are not 
confident of victory; far less. Let not a creditable 
showing be our aim, but rather victory, and never 
defeat. The manager has arranged a schedule of 
which we may well be proud. We need all the 
growth of last year's effort, and what sturdy practice 
every day for a month can furnish, to meet it. The 
men seem determined, and Coach Murphy is to be 
praised for the energetic way in which he goes about 
his business. The team will respond to such treat- 
ment. It's example they're after, and that's what 
they need. On Saturday we meet Holy Cross at 
Worcester. One year ago, at the opening of the 
year, we played them on their own ground, and lost 
by only a small score. Let's strive to turn the tide. 



But few improvements have been made round col- 
lege during the summer, but the outlay of money was 
surely warranted by the increased facilities afforded, 
and by the neatness that is at once apparent where 
improvement has been made. Most noticeable and 
commendable of these, perhaps, is the new lavatory 
in the Drill Hall. The need of such a thing has long 
been apparent, and hearty thanks are due those who 
succeeded in securing the much-sought-for improve- 
ment. The appropriation of one of the rooms in 
South College for a registrar's office, where the regis- 
trar may be consulted certain days of the week, has 
made it convenient for the students with whom this 
college official comes in close touch, as well as for 
the registrar himself. In lieu of an administration 
building the advantage of locating the offices of the 
different departments in the administration of college 
matters in close proximity is at once apparent. In 
addition to the new cases placed in the museum of 
the Zoological Department last term, two new ones 



were put in the recitation room during the summer. 
The anatomical paper models which were formerly 
kept in the museum, and which are used constantly in 
class-room demonstration have been placed in one of 
the new cases where they may be more readily 
stowed. The reading room in the North Dormitory 
has been re-papered, and now has a bright and attrac- 
tive appearance. It is hoped that other and more ex- 
tended improvements in those places where the stu- 
dents are accustomed to meet may not be long forth- 
coming. 



IN MEMORY OF 

PERCY FLETCHER FELCH, 
Class of 1900, Mass. Agricultural College. 
Drowned in the Connecticut river, at North Hadley, 
on July 8, 1900. 
Percy F. Felch was born in Ayer, Mass., on March 
5, 1878. His father died in July of 1883, and about 
one year later the widow with her six-year old son 
moved to Worcester, where they lived until the date 
of Felch's entrance into college. He received his 
early education in the public schools of Worcester, in 
addition spending one year at school at Andover, N, 
H. He entered the Mass. Agricultural College in the 
fall of 1893, remaining for one year only. He entered 
again in the fall of 1897 as a member of the sopho- 
more class, completing his course with that class and 
being graduated on June 20, 1900. Felch remained 
in Amherst after graduation until the time of his 
death, continuing his studies for the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy in Entomology. 

During his college course Felch was neither an 
extremely brilliant student nor an active man in the 
college organizations. His rank in the class was 
good, while his quiet manner and reticent nature held 
him apart from his fellow students ; he seemed to 
enjoy being by himself. He made few intimate 
friends, but made no enemies. He was fond of 
music, and spent considerable of his time with his cor- 
net. He was a member of the College Choir and of 
the Glee Club, and the writer of the 1900 Class Song. 
He was also a member of the Natural History Soci- 
ety, the Y. M. C. A., and the College Shakespearean 
Society. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



RESOLUTIONS OF THE CLASS OF NINETEEN HUN- 
DRED M. A. C. 

In memory of our classmate, Percy Fletcher Felch, who 
was taken from us July 8, 1900. 

Whereas, It has pleased our Almighty Lord, in His infinite 
wisdom, to remove from our midst our beloved classmate, 
Percy Fletcher Felch ; and 

Whereas, We keenly feel our mutual loss, and deeply sym- 
pathize with his bereaved mother and family, and sincerely 
mourn his early demise ; be it 

Resolved, That we, the Class of Nineteen Hundred of the 
Mass. Agricultural College, do hereby extend to his bereaved 
mother and family our sincere and heartfelt sympathy. And 
be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the 
bereaved family, a copy to the Aggie Life to be published in 
the first issue, and that another copy be kept and filed with 
the records of the Class of Nineteen Hundred. 

A. C. MoNAHAN, President, 
E. K. Atkins, Secretary. 
Amherst, Mass., July 15, 1900. 



IN MEMORY OF 

PERCY FLETCHER FELCH, 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 1900, 

DECEASED, 

Whereas, It has pleased our Allwise Father, in his infinite 

love, to take from us our brother, and 

Whereas, We very deeply mourn his loss, and sympathize 
with his bereaved mother in this hour of greatest trial, be it 
therefore 

Resolved, That we, his former club-mates, mourning his 
early death, feeling deeply that we have lost a faithful and 
sincere friend, and grieving for the bereaved family, do ex- 
tend our deepest sympathy to the bereaved mother, and be 
it further 

Resolved, That a copy of the resolutions be sent to the fam- 
ily of our departed brother, that a copy be published in the 
first issue of Aggie Life, and that a copy be filed with the 
records of the College Shakespearean Club. 

H. Baker, ^ Committee 

A. C. MoNAHAN, > for the 
C. T. Leslie. ) Club. 



A LOSS TO THE COLLEGE. 

{{From Amherst Record.)) 
The Agricultural college had no better friend than 
the Hon. James S. Grinnell whose death occurred 
last week. Elected a trustee of the college in 1878, 
he held office at the time of his death and had served 
as vice-president of the corporation. He was a 
regular attendant at the commencement exercises at 
the college, even in later years when his health was so 



broken that he was In need of the services of a con- 
stant attendant. He was in constant touch with the 
work and the needs of the institution, and his wide 
acquaintance with men of influence throughout the 
Commonwealth enabled him to enlist their sympathy 
and secure their aid in behalf of the college when 
such aid was of especial value. A graduate of Amherst 
College and in no wise inclined to belittle the benefits 
derived from a classical education, he was fully alive 
to the advantages offered by an institution conducted 
on different lines and it was his earnest desire that 
these advantages should be more generally understood, 
more widely appreciated, more fully availed of by the 
young men of Massachusetts. In scientific agriculture 
he saw the solution of the problems confronting the 
farmers, the dairymen, the fruit-growers and the 
market-gardeners of New England. 



HON. W. R. SESSIONS. 

To fill the place, so long and so faithfully held by 
the late James S. Grinnell of Greenfield, the college 
has been fortunate in securing, by appointment of the 
Governor, Honorable William R. Sessions as a trustee 
by appointment of the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College. Mr. Sessions has long been known to the 
people of this state in his capacity of Secretary of the 
State Board of Agriculture. The duties of this office 
he has faithfully discharged for fourteen years, during 
which time he has been ex-officio a member of the 
board of trustees of the college, serving as chairman 
of the Committee on Farm and Horticultural Depart- 
ments as well as the Committee on Experiment 
Department. 

Mr. Sessions was never graduated from college 
walls, being a self-made man. He has always deeply 
regretted the circumstances that prevented him from 
securing collegiate training, but like many other men 
who have been deprived of the advantages of a college 
education he has taken a strong and lively interest in 
educational institutions and the grand work that they 
accomplish. By a native intelligence he has worked 
himself to the front, until he is recognized by all who 
know him as an able and practical man. Mr. Ses- 
sions is a veteran of the war of the Rebellion. Dur- 
ing the war he was taken prisoner and confined in 
Libby prison until exchanged. He has served several 
terms in both branches of the Massachusetts General 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Court, being at one time chairman of the Committee 
on the Division of Towns. But it is in his connection 
with the State Board of Agriculture that he is best 
and most favorably known, and it is probably in this 
connection that he will be longest remembered. 



THE FRATERNITY CONFERENCE. 

The fraternity conference, consisting of three dele- 
gates, two undergraduates and one alumnus, from each 
of the college fraternities, met on September 6, for 
the election of officers and the transaction of business. 
The following officers were elected: J. H. Chicker- 
ing, president ; R. I, Smith, vice-president ; C. E. 
Gordon, secretary and treasurer. There was a strong 
sentiment among the members present in favor of 
continuing the work of the conference. With the end 
in view of promoting the same harmonious spirit that 
prevailed a year ago the following resolution was sub- 
mitted and was adopted by the conference : 

" The fraternity conference desires to call the atten- 
tion of the fraternities in the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural college to the harmony and esprit-de-corps that 
prevailed throughout the college last year, to the 
notable absence of petty jealousies, and to the 
athletic successes which the strong public spirit so 
effectively promoted. It requests their hearty sup- 
port, and invites suggestions as to methods of accomp- 
lishing its purpose of promoting a wholesome college 
spirit." 

James H. Chickering, President. 
C. E. Gordon, Secretary. 

A copy of the resolution was sent to each fraternity. 

At a meeting of the conference held December 
15, 1898, it was voted that a definite time be recom- 
mended during which the fraternities shall mutually 
agree to pledge no new men, and that this time 
extend to the opening day of the winter term ; and 
that, if these recommendations be adopted, it shall be 
the duty of the chairman of the fraternity conference 
committee to meet the freshman class within three 
days of the opening of the college year and state this 
agreement ; and that it shall be published in the 
Y. M. C. A. hand-book, and in the first issue of the 
year of Aggie Life. 

This agreement was sent to the different fraterni- 
ties, and was favorably received and returned with the 
following changes : " In the case of a student entering 



college after Dec. 1 ,he shall not be pledged for at least 
one month. The agreement shall be presented by the 
president of the senior class instead of the chairman 
of the conference committee." The changes were 
accepted and adopted by the conference and the 
agreement was again submitted for the approval of the 
fraternities. At a meeting held April 26, 1899 dele- 
gates from all the fraternities reported that the recom- 
mendations of the committee had been accepted. 



INSPECTOR'S REPORT. 

With the permission of Captain Anderson we pub- 
lish the following report of the Assistant Inspector 
General of the Department of the East, who visited 
the College last term and inspected troops, equip- 
ments, and quarters : 

Portland, Me., June 8, 1900. 
The Inspector General, 
United States Army, 

Washington, D. C. 

Sir : — I have the honor to submit the following re- 
port of an Inspection of the military department of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, made at Am- 
herst, Mass., June 1, 1900. The last inspection was 
made June 9, 1897 by Colonel R. P. Hughes, In- 
spector General, U. S. Army. 

The officer detailed at this institution is Captain John 
Anderson, U. S. Army, retired, who has been on duty 
since January 12, 1900. 

There are 82 students in the military department, 
74 of whom were present at inspection. The review 
of the four companies and colors in single rank was 
very good. The military bearing of the cadets was 
good. The rifles were in good condition but the 
equipments were in fair condition only. Battalion 
drill very good. Drill two companies formed in 
double ranks was very good. No extended order or 
other drills up to this time; waiting for the hay to be 
harvested. There is a good shooting gallery. 

This school up to the arrival of the present officer, 
has been without military instruction for nearly two 
years, and as a consequence the students had lost in- 
terest in the work, and many of the students had 
never had military instruction, so the work had to be 
started from the beginning, and interest aroused. 
The work next year will probably show much better 
results. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



The uniform worn by the cadets is dark blue blouse, 
light blue trousers, and the old style forage cap. In 
summer white trousers are worn. 

Three hours per week are devoted to practical mil- 
itary instruction, which embraces all movements in 
infantry drill, regulations to include battalion drill, re- 
views, and guard mounting. Both practical and the- 
oretical instruction has been given in the duty of sen- 
tinels. Military drill is obligatory upon all students, 
although the senior class was excused for this year 
only. 

The number of cadets engaged in small arms target 
practice was 33. The ranges were 100 and 200 
yards, and the results are reported fair. The drill 
ground is suitable and the facilities for indoor drill are 
good. 

Two hours per week are devoted to the theoretical 
.instruction which consists of lectures, recitations in 
elements of military science, drill and army regula- 
tions, organization and discipline and service manuals. 
The military professor has delivered four lectures, 
Waterloo snd Gettysburg were the campaigns studied. 
The text-books used are Wagner's Security and In- 
formation, Pettit's Science of War, The Waterloo 
Campaign of Napoleon, Drill and Army Regulations, 
and Service Manuals. 

The government property at the College consists of 
147 Springfield Cadet rifles, caliber 45, with equip- 
ments complete, and six non-commissioned officers' 
swords and belts. In addition there are 76 sabres 
and belts, and 6 N. C. 0. swords and belts belonging 
to the school. There is no signal property. 

There are 2 B. L. field pieces and sights and sight 
pouches were on hand but no carriages have yet been 
received. There are also two caissons complete on 
hand, they are obsolete and unserviceable. There 
are also 8-inch mortars. 

There are no record books belonging to the govern- 
ment,those in use belonging to the College. It is rec- 
ommended that a complete set of books be furnished 
which would be receipted for by the College receiv- 
ing them, and they would then be subject to the dis- 
position of the War Department. 

Very respectfully, 
(Signed) Davis, 
Major 1st artillery. Assist, to Inspector General De- 
partment of the East. 



PROMOTIONS. 

Mass. Agr'l College, 

Military Dep't, 
Amherst, Mass., September 12, 1900. 
Orders No. 3. 

With the advice and approval of the President of 
the College the following promotions and appoint- 
ments are hereby made, and are to take effect this 
date : 

Cadet Captain, W. C. Dickerman to be Cadet Major. 
Cadet 1st Lieutenant, N. D. Whitman to be Cadet 

Captain, vice Dickerman, promoted. 
Cadet 2nd Lieutenant, E. L. Macomber to be Cadet 
1st Lieutenant, vice Gordon appointed Battalion 
Adjutant. 
Cadet 2nd Lieutenant, E. S. Gamwell to be Cadet 

1st Lieutenant, vice Whitman promoted. 
Cadet 1st Sergeant, Thaddeus Graves, Jr. to be Ca- 
det 2nd Lieutenant, vice Gamwell promoted. 
Cadet 1st Sergeant, T. Casey to be Cadet 2nd Lieu- 
tenant, vice Macomber, promoted. 
Cadet Corporal, R. W. Morse to be Cadet Sergeant, 

vice Graves, promoted. 
Cadet Corporal, A. L. Dacy to be Cadet Sergeant, 

vice Casey, promoted. 
Cadet Private, T. F. Cooke to be Cadet Corporal, 

vice Dacy, promoted. 
Cadet Private, W. R. Pierson to be Cadet Corporal, 

vice Morse promoted. 
Cadet 1st Lieutenant, C. E. Gordon is hereby ap- 
pointed Battalion Adjutant with rank of 1st 
Lieutenant. 
Cadet, J. C.Barry is hereby appointed Quarter Master 
Sergeant with rank of 1st Lieutenant. 
The above named officers and non-commissioned 
officers will be obeyed and respected accordingly. 

John Anderson, 
Capt. U. S. a., 
Commandant. 
Official, Sept. 12. N. D. Whitman, Adj. 



Dartmouth college opened Sept. 13 for its 123d 
year. The entering class numbers two hundred and 
fifteen, an increase of thirty-one. The College has 
adopted a new system of coaching its football men. 
Each class must support a class team and no man 
will be taken on the varsity but by selection from the 
class teams, 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE ENTERING CLASS. 

William E. Allen. Winthrop 

Ernest A. Back, Florence 

Ray P. Baker, Amherst 

Hugh L. Barnes, Curtisville 

William W. Copeland, Townsend 

F. Dickinson Couden, Yarmouthport 

John F. Cummings, Brockton 

Edward T. Esip, Amherst 

John J. Fahey, Pittsfield 

Ralph P. Gay, Stoughton 

George A. Graves, Northampton 

John W. Gregg, South Natick 

Clarence H. Griffin, Winthrop 

Adolf F. Haffenreffer, Jamaica Plain 

Charles P. Halligan, Roslindale 

Robert S. Handy, Cataumet 

Sidney B, Haskell, Southbridge 

Fred F, Henshaw, Templeton 

Louis W. Hill, Greenfield Hill, Conn. 

Justin Kelliher, Brockton 

Daniel W. Kirby, Webster 

Clarence W. Lewis, Melrose Highlands 

Howard D. Newton, Curtisville 

Sumner R. Parker, Brimfield 

A. Russell Paul, Framingham Centre 

James A. Pease, Greenfield Hill, Conn 

Arthur L. Peck, Hartford, Conn 

Hervey C. Pierce, West Millbury 

Raymond A. Quigley, Brockton 

R. Raym.ond Raymouth, Goshen 

Charles H. Richardson, Boxborough 

Arthur Ryan, Sunderland 

Ralph D. Sawin, Boston 

Parkman F. Staples, Westboro 

Clarence L. Thompson, South Natick 

Howard M. White, Springfield 

George A. Witherell, Warwick 

Henry H. Witt, Belchertown 

The following men are taking post graduate work 
at the college : 

Theodore H. Eaton (Harvard 1900) St. Louis, Mo. 
Horticulture, Agriculture and Entomology. 

Chas, L. S. Paull (Brown Univ. 1900) Special 
work in vegetable Pathology, 

George F. Babb (Bates College) Amherst. Spec- 
ial work in Chemistry. 



J. B. Knight (M. A. C, '92) Belchertown. Ph. 
D. in Entomology, Botany and Chemistry. 

W. Elmer Hinds (M. A. C, '99) Townsend. Ph. 
D. Entomology, Botany and Chemistry. 

Charles M. Walker (M. A. C, '99) Amherst, Ph. 
D. in Entomology, Botany and Chemistry. 

A. W. Morrill (M. A. C, 1900) Tewksbury, M. S. 
in Entomology and Botany. 

A. C. Monahan (M. A. C, 1900) M. S. in Math- 
ematics. 



/ithletic No-t^s- 



Once more, after nearly a year's rest we have taken 
up Foot Ball, beginning where we left off after our 
last game with Williston. The prospect is to say the 
least very encouraging to all concerned. At a meet- 
ing of the student body on Friday, Sept. 7, a tax was 
levied on the college in total by a unanimous vote of all 
the men present and one hundred and thirty dollars in 
cash was taken at the meeting thus putting the asso- 
ciation on a firm footing. 

Captain Cook posted the notice for the first practice 
on Thursday, Sept. 6 and was gratified by the appear- 
ance of about twenty men several of them being men 
from the entering class. Halligan '00 second coach, 
took charge of the squad and gave them a light 
practice his aim being to get the men into good con- 
dition, physically, as soon as possible. He found 
some good material among the new men, the most 
promising being Lewis of Melrose, Halligan of Roslin- 
dale, Kelliher of Brockton, and Pierce of Boston. 
Just what positions these men will try for is not sure 
but in all probability Halligan will fill the tackle left 
vacant by Stanley, Lewis will try for a position back 
of the line, Kelliher and Pierce will make the ends 
hustle. Among the veternan players who reported 
were Cooke who will undoubtedly stick to his old position 
at tackle, Paul will be at centre with Snell and 
Gamwell as guards, Bodfish at his end, and O'Hearn 
who has not yet reported but is expected back in a 
short time. Back of the line Barry, Chickering and 
Whitman will fill the two halves and quarter while 
there are several men looking for ex-captain Halligan 's 
position as full, but none who can fill it in every way, 
Chase '02 being the most promising candidate at 
present. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



On Monday coach Murphy of Brown took charge 
of the varsity squad and at cnce put them hard at 
work giving them a good deal of practice in handHng 
kicks, dropping on the ball and tackling, but also start- 
ing signal and formation practice. The men have 
taken the week's work well, on the whole, only a very 
few having received any telling knocks. The team is 
rapidly getting into shape for the season and will easily 
give the Holy Cross men a run for their money. 

Captain Cooke entered college from Sedgwick Insti- 
tute where he played guard and tackle on the team 
for two seasons. In his Freshman year he easily 
made the varsity playing a guard, under the Princeton 
style of play. He played a strong aggressive game 
through this season picking up many of the tricks of 
the trade. In his Sophomore year the team adopted 
the U. of P. style of guards back, demanding heavy 
guards and Cook was moved to tackle showing by his 
improved style the wisdom of the change. During 
the Junior year he developed so much and proved 
such a " tower of strength," in the line that he was 
chosen by the team to lead them through another 
season of victories. He has taken the position in a 
good spirit giving a great deal of time and energy to 
the game and surely deserves success. 

Chickering entered College in the fall of ninety- 
seven with a foot ball record earned in Dover, Mass. 
Being too light for the Varsity he tried for the class 
team making an end rush with ease. In his Sopho- 
more year he was tried on the Varsity first as an end 
rush and later as a half-back proving his right to that 
position by his speed, strength and grit. Last season 
he made a try for half-back holding that position for 
the season. His play has always been marked by 
nerve and pluck while his speed when once started 
with the ball made him a sure ground gainer. 

Barry, the other half-back, has been on the Varsity 
through the three years that he has been in College. 
He filled the position of sub, to the backs during his 
first year, made the varsity in his second and third. 
His play is always marked by steadiness and strength 
making him a valuable man for both offense and 
defense. This year he is a bit heavier than before 
but is just as quick as ever. 

Whitman has played quarter one year under coach 
Murphy with honors. He entered from Boston Tech. 



where he played on both his class team and the varsity 
as quarter. Last season he played quarter in a very 
satisfactory manner being very sure of his pass and 
always a help to the line men on ends in breaking up 
formations. This season his head will probably run 
the plays of the team, and his voice encourage the 
line men to their work. 

Bodfish, made his first appearance with the varsity 
last season, trying for tackle at first, and later being 
moved to end, where he surprised all, even himself, 
by his good work. He is a good heady man, never 
drawn in before the play is off and a hard sure tackier. 
His criss-cross play was a sure ground gainer last 
season and his work this season promises a gain in his 
play rather than any loss. 

Gamwell received his foot ball instruction at the 
Pittsfield High School where he played center for 
three seasons. In his Freshman year he was kept 
from the field by a bad leg which also troubled him. 
during his Sophomore year. Last season he came 
out for a line position and found no one who could 
hold him at guard. He is a quiet player, never look- 
ing for roses from the side-lines but always up to his 
work and ready to make a hole of any size, as aground 
gainer he is always sure of his distance if called upon 
when a short gain is necessary. 

Snell held down the position of guard last season in 
a very gratifying way. He entered college from 
Methuen, Mass., where he played end rush for two 
years. He was tried first at end and then at guard 
being a valuable man. He is good natured to a 
degree and needs frequent working but as a ground 
gainer he is magnificent and as a defensive player he 
is strong enough for anything. 

Paul came out for the varsity last season, after 
two years among the Cubans, and proved a strong 
center. He is a light man for the position but plays 
with a snap and dash that win him many bright laurels. 
He is always counted on as a tackier even though he 
is at the center as he always breaks through and gets 
down the field ahead of the back. 

Bridgforth is a strong player in the line, both on 
offense and defense. Last season he was played in 
our hardest games against Holy Cross and Wesleyan 
proving his right to a foot ball suit and an M. 



8 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Besides the veteran varsity men who are tried and 
true there are a number of men out who are as yet, 
" dark horses," in the race among these Chase '02, 
Davison '01, Dwyer '02, Morse '02, Franklin '03, 
Bowler '03, Belden '02, Cook '03, Brooks '03, 
Thompson '04, Couden '04 and several others are 
working well and are sure for the second eleven if not 
the first. 

In addition to the Varsity Schedule, which appears in 
this issue, a schedule is being arranged for the second 
team which will play a half dozen games during the 
month of October. It is necessary that the men who 
wish to make the varsity squad, either on the First or 
Second elevens should come out and make the other 
people work. 

The weights of the men making up the veteran 
varsity squad are : 

Cooke 170 lbs., Whitman 150 lbs. 

Chickerlng 150 lbs., Gamwell 185 lbs. 

Barry 155 lbs., Snell 185 lbs. 

Bodfish 160 lbs., Paul 158 lbs. 

Bridgforth 168 lbs. 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE FOR SEASON OF 1900. 

Sept. 22. Holy Cross at Worcester. 

Sept. 29. Worcester Academy at Amherst. 

Oct. 6. Norwich University at Amherst. 

Oct. 13. Wesleyan at Middletown. 

Oct. 17. Williams at Williamstown. 

Oct. 20. Trinity at Hartford. 

Oct. 27. Vermont University at Burlington. 

Nov. 3. Storrs at Amherst. 

Nov. 10. Worcester Tech. at Worcester. 

Nov. 17. Amherst on Pratt Field. 



Colle;^^ ^lot^S- 



— Prof. Howard spent his vacation in Nova Scotia. 
— The entering class numbers thirty-eight 
— R. W. Morse, 1902, spent the summer at Cot- 
tage City. 

— Coach Murphy has arrived, and is training the 
foot ball team. 

— The museum will be open to visitors in the after- 
noon of every day excepting Sunday from 3-30 to 
5-30 p. M. 



— -The farm department is expecting a new herds- 
man to arrive about Thursday. 

— Prof. Babson won the silver cup in the Country 
Club golf tournament just ended. 

■ — L. C. Claflin, 1902, spent the summer at Jack- 
son, N. H., as did also H. Paul. 

— Saunders who entered with 1900 has returned to 
college, entering the class of 1902. 

— E. McCobb, 1902, has not returned and it is not 
known whether he will do so or not. 

— Perkins and Blake of 1903 will not return to 
college, leaving twenty-six in that class. 

— Raymouth has been elected by the freshmen for 
president. The class captain is Kelliher. 

— A tax of $1.75 has been levied upon the student 
body to maintain the reading room this year. 

■ — Lewis, 1902, hopes to arrive about the first of 
October. He is suffering from nervous collapse. 

— J. C. Hall and V. A. Gates, 1902, have moved 
from their rooms in North College to 97 Pleasant St, 

— Thursday's drill was in bayonet exercise. The 
freshmen are enjoying a course in setting-up exercises. 

— President Goodell attended a summer outing of 
the State Board of Agriculture, held on the fourth, at 
Marshfield. 

— Dwyer, 1902, has taken a position at the Insec- 
tary to fill the one left by Chase who is rooming in 
South College. 

—J. H. Belden, 1902, has bought from J. Hall his 
stock of goods which he will sell from the old stand 
in North College. 

— A new text-book has been adopted for the junior 
literature course ; it is a " History of English Litera- 
ture " by Halleck. 

— The following men were recently voted into the 
Y. M. C. A.: Knight, J. B., Barnes, Raymouth, New- 
ton, and Copeland. 

— Dr. Walker gave a description of his vacation 
experiences on Sault St. Marie canals to the Grange 
the other evening. 

— J. C. Hall has resigned from his position as 
business manager of the 1 902 Index. R. W. Morse 
ha? been elected to fill his place. T. Carpenter has 
been added to the board. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— The rumor that the drill hall was to receive a 
coat of paint during the summer seems to be still in 
the rumor stage of development. 

— At a mass-meeting held after chapel a tax of 
three dollars and fifty cents v/as levied on each 
member of the college to support the foot-ball team. 

— Seniors Gamwell and Rice have taken up their 
residence in the tower of South College. Monahan, 
1900 and his brother, 1903, have moved to Mr. 
Thompson's. 

— The rush which took place on Thursday night 
was very indecisive, being decided a tie by the upper 
classmen. Since then several rushes have taken 
place on the walk from the Drill Hall to South 
College. 

— Professor P. B. Hasbrouck having been called 
home by the illness of his father, Professor J. E. 
Ostander is conducting recitations in Junior Physics 
for the present, and A. C. Monahan, '00, is acting as 
substitute instructor in freshman mathematics. 

— The Fruit Growers association held a gathering 
on the grounds on Wednesday. A large number were 
present and they enjoyed a good supply of samples. 
The fruit has not suffered as much as would be sup- 
posed on account of the dry season although in some 
cases it does not fill out satisfactorily. The junior 
class was invited to assist in the sampling which they 
did with alacrity. 

— A number of the fellows are contemplating join- 
ing the Country Club and " lofters " have been digging 
campus turf during the past week under the strong 
arms of several zealous amateur enthusiasts. Those 
seriously considering the matter of joining will do well 
to take advantage of the present entrance fee which 
will soon be increased from five to ten dollars. The 
limit is October 1. Information may be obtained from 
N. D. Whitman, '01, or from Professor R. S. Lull. 

— The department of Entomology has just received 
a photo-micrographic camera for use in photographing 
microscopic objects. It is so constructed that the 
object to be photographed is placed under the micro- 
scope and brought in focus just as for ordinary study. 
The camera is then connected with the eyepiece of 
the microscope, and by extending the camera to the 
desired distance a photograph of the size desired may 
be obtained, the lenses of the microscope taking the 



place of the usual camera lens. Tests of the camera 
thus far have proved very satisfactory, and as the 
plates are of the sizes used in lantern slides, the pro- 
duction of these showing microscopic objects is made 
easy. ^ 

— A social gathering under the auspices of the col- 
lege Y. M. C. A. was held in the chapel on Friday 
night for the purpose of welcoming the freshman class. 
During the evening President Goodell made some 
very appropriate remarks concerning the feelings at 
present existing between the two lower classes that 
are not exactly " brotherly or gentlemanly." Gordon 
of the senior class and editor of the Life also gave a 
talk,the subject of which was the college paper This 
was followed by a few words from Prof. Mills. Other 
features had been arranged but the time would not 
allow their fulfillment. It is suggested that we have 
more of this sort of thing; we need it for several 
reasons. 



THE FRUIT-GROWERS' MEETING. 

The fall field meeting of the Massachusetts Fruit 
Growers' association was held at the college grounds 
on Sept, 7 and 8. The program was varied in char- 
acter but fortunately the weather conditions remained 
excellent for field work. 

Owing to the fact that many of the leading fruit- 
growers were in the midst of picking and marketing 
their crop, and therefore unable to be present as they 
had intended, the number was not as large as had 
been hoped. Nevertheless, a party of about sixty 
assembled at the Botanic museum on the afternoon of 
the 7th for an inspection of the grounds. Quite a 
number of these were students interested in the study 
of horticulture from a practical stand point. The 
afternoon was pleasantly and profitably spent in look- 
ing over the cold storage plant, the vineyard and the 
several orchards. Since the number of varieties 
grown experimentally here is very large the opportu- 
nity for comparison of the most promising sorts is 
most excellent. This fall it was especially good, 
since nearly all kinds of fruit have been very produc- 
tive this year and each one showed at its best. The 
crop on the college grounds is the largest and on the 
whole the best in the history of the institution. The 
visitors expressed themselves as highly pleased at the 
results obtained by the horticultural department, and 
evinced much interest in the college as a whole. 



10 



AGGIE LIFE. 



In the evening, a meeting was held in the Amherst 
house parlors, and the question " What shall we do 
with the Apple Crop ?" was thoroughly discussed by 
those present. This is a topic of much importance to 
most of our growers, since the apple crop this year is 
something tremendous and the supply threatens to 
exceed the demand. The consensus of opinion 
seemed to be that none but the best fruit should be 
marketed, thus avoiding a glutting of the market with 
an inferior product. 

Saturday morning barges were secured and the 
party drove over to the well-known farm of J. W. Clark 
on Mt. Warner. Here an opportunity was given to 
inspect a plant managed for profit and in first-class 
bearing condition. With this trip the meeting came 
to an end, being voted by all to have been one of the 
most successful in the annals of the Association. 



BOTANICAL PRIZES FOR THE YEAR 1901. 

hills' prizes. 
$20.00 for the best herbarium. 
$10.00 for the second best herbarium. 
$5.00 for the best collection of woods. 
In addition to the Hills' prizes there will be offered 
for 1901 : 

$5.00 for the best collection of named lichens. 
$5.00 for the best collection of named pathogenic 
fungi. 
The following points will be taken into consideration 
In judging the herbarium : Correct naming will count 
25 per cent, neatness and completeness of speci- 
mens and style of mounting and labeling, 20 per cent, 
size of herbarium, 15 per cent, order of arrange- 
ment of family, genera and species, 10 per cent, 
native specimens, 20 per cent, number of families 
represented, 10 per cent. 



E^scKan^^es- 



The great bulk of our exchanges come from the 
preparatory schools. It is manifestly unfair to judge 
these by any standard set for college publications. 
We cannot expect so much, for the editors must nec- 
essarily be more immature, more prone to mere 
superficialities, and lacking in the breadth of mind 
which a college training gives. In general, the High 



School paper contains the first attempts at literary 
work and the result is crude and imperfect. It takes 
time and practice to produce polished work. At the 
same time such papers are interesting as giving a clue 
to what may be expected later on. They furnish an 
opportunity for the student to develop his powers of 
expression at a time when they are most likely to be 
latent, supplementing as nothing else can do the com- 
positions and essays of the class-room. In some re- 
spects they are even more valuable, since the writer 
addresses a larger audience and, moreover, one of 
whose good opinion he is very desirous. We think, 
therefore, that every High School should have its 
paper just as it has its athletic teams. Both are in- 
dications of enterprise, and none of us can afford to 
be thought unenterprising in these days of fierce 
competition. 

The three most noticeable points about these pre- 
paratory school papers are their covers, locals, and 
exchange columns. In the matter of covers we 
freely concede that the High Schools surpass the col- 
lege journals. We find many very attractive designs, 
quite often the work of the students too, which is even 
more to be praised. One of the prettiest covers we 
have ever seen adorns the May number of the Pierian 
from Naugatuck, Conn., and there are many others 
which are worthy of commendation. And this is no 
slight point in a paper's favor. Covers are very much 
like clothes. A well-dressed man creates at first 
sight a good impression ; so too, an attractive cover 
serves to hide for a time some very glaring faults. 
However, to carry the parallel a little further, it is well 
to remember that such an advantage is pnly tempo- 
rary ; a well-dressed man who is nothing more, soon 
keenly disappoints ; and the paper with no other mer- 
its will do the same. Moreover, just as a plain black 
suit is always in good taste, irrespective of styles, so 
the simple black and white of many of the college 
papers is not to be disparagingly criticised. And in 
both covers and dress the loud and flashy is always to 
be avoided. 

The locals and school-notes we believe to be one 
of the stumbling-blocks of the High School papers. 
We all like a joke. The fact that it is on somebody 
else makes it all the better. At the same time, 
there are limits to what should appear in print. 
Marked personalities, like unduly severe criticism, is 



AGGIE LIFE. 



II 



far better omitted. Items like the following, taken at 
random from &.n exchange which is no worse in this 
respect than dozens of others, can do no good, and 
may cause hard feeling and bitterness : " Jake Is so 
lonely now since Ruth has been having senior vaca- 
tion;" "Anna Williams says she intends to appear 
on the stage this season at Vallamont Park ; " "Which 
one is it, Gertie, Foster, Charles or Clarence ? " 

Such items are not funny, they are only silly. They 
indicate a sickly sentimentality born of pickles and 
chewing-gum. Just think, editors, how they must 
sound to entire strangers among whom your paper 
goes each month ; how will you consider them ten 
years from now ? And do you believe your parents 
are pleased with any paper that will print such stuff ? 
A little sound common sense along this line is sorely 
needed. 

The exchange column continues to be a much- 
mooted question. Every editor seems to have his 
own ideas. So we have space devoted to exchanges 
ranging from the zero point in a great many up to the 
limit reached by the Lake Breeze which in its last is- 
sue devoted eleven columns out of its twenty-eight. 
We find mere lists of exchanges, comprehensive re- 
views, and everything between. To secure uniformity 
of treatment is manifestly impossible and indeed not 
specially desirable. We do believe, however, that it 
is only courtesy to our exchanges to make some sort 
of acknowledgment. Where a criticism is made it 
ought to be thorough and discriminating enough to 
mean something. Also, it behooves us to remember 
that as the exchange column is probably the least in- 
teresting of any to the subscribers, it must be kept 
within limits and not allowed to crowd out items of 
more general interest. 



Alu 



mm. 



'74. — It is with much sadness we record the death 
of Frank S. Smith of Cleveland, Ohio. Mr. Smith 
was struck by an electric car while crossing the street 
on June 20th, receiving injuries from which he could 
not recover, passing away on the 24th. 

77. — Waldo V. Howe has resigned his position as 
superintendent in the Ann Jaques hospital and pur- 
chased for himself a farm. Mr. Howe is intent upon 
poultry farming. Address, the Moranes, Newburyport. 



'82. — Winthrop E. Stone, President of Purdue 
University, Indiana. 

'86. — Richard F. Duncan, sailing on his yacht in 
the Bermudas, and there practicing medicine. 

'86. — D. F. Carpenter has accepted the position of 
principal of the McGan Normal Institute, Reeds Ferry, 
New Hampshire. 

'87, — Frank B. Carpenter of Richmond, Va., chem- 
ist for Virginia and Carolina Chemical Company, was 
in Amherst recently. 

'91. — A. G. Fames, War Correspondent tor Bos- 
ton /owrwa/ in China. 

'91, Louis F. Horner married September 3rd to 
Miss Frances M. Ashton, will reside at Riven Rock, 
Montecito, Cal. 

'93. — Dr. G. F. Curley married June 20 to Miss 
Cecillia McGann of Milford residence at No. 10 Con- 
gress St., Milford, Mass. 

'93. — Fred G. Clark, Holyoke, Mass., Corner Ca- 
bot and Lycannie Sts. 

'93. — Henry D. Clark, veterinary surgeon at 12 
Mechanic St., Fitchburg, Mass. 

'93. — Harry J. Hanlon, dairying at West Boylston, 
Mass. 

'93. — Frank H. Henderson, civil engineer at 49 
Meridian St., Maiden, Mass. 

'93. — Franklin S. Hoyt, supervising principal of 
schools in New Haven, Conn. Address is 91 Alden, 
Ave. 

'93. — A. E. Melendy, farmer at Sterling Junction, 
Mass. 

'93. — John R. Perry, decorator at 8 Bromfield St., 
Boston, Mass. 

'93. — The announcement of the marriage of Luix 
Antonio Ferreira Tinoco has at last reached us. The 
marriage took place upon July 28. Tinoco is a su- 
gar cane planter and a partner in a sugar factory. 
Address Campos. E. do. Rio, Brazil. 

Ex.-'94. — John S. Goodell who was shut up in 
Galveston, Texas, during the flood has been heard 
from and is safe. 

'94. — Claude F. Walker has charge of the Natural 
History Department of the High School at New 
Britain, Conn. 



12 



AGGIE LIFE. 



'94. — A. J. Morse married to Miss Lillia Davis at 
the home of the bride on Federal St., Belchertown, 
August 22, 1900. 

'95. — E. A. White has charge of the department 
of Horticulture, Botany and Floriculture at the Baron 
DeHirsch Agricultural and Industrial school, Wood- 
bine, New Jersey. 

'95. — Dr. F. L. Warren, surgeon at the King's 
County hospital to which he was called last March. 

'96. — S. W. Fletcher, who took his degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy at Cornell, has been appointed 
professor of Horticulture and Forestry in the Wash- 
ington State College. Mr. Fletcher previous to pur- 
suing advanced study was assistant in the Horticultu- 
ral department of this college, and during the last 
summer he served as instructor in the summer school 
of Cornell University. 

'96. — The marriage of Clayton Palmer to Miss 
Jessie Spencer of Eastford, Conn., on July 29th has 
been announed. The couple will be at their home in 
Mansfield. Pa., after January first. 

'97. — The marriage of Dr. L. L. Cheney to Miss 
Frances A. Cleary, June 27, has been announced. 
Dr. Cheney will reside at 921 Woodlawn Avenue, 
Augusta, Georgia. 

Ex. -'98. — W. Quincy Kinsman has enlisted in the 
regular army for foreign service. He will remain at 
Fort Wood in New York harbor till October, when he 
expects to sail for the Philippines and possibly to 
China. 

'Ex. -'98. — T.H. Charmbury has received his degree 
at the Dental department of the Baltimore Medical 
college. He is now practicing at Seymour, Conn. 

NINETEEN HUNDRED. 

E. K. Atkins, North Amherst, Mass. 
Howard Baker, veterinary student at U. of P. 
Howard Brown, assistant agriculturist at Hatch 
Experiment station, Amherst, Mass. 
M. A. Campbell, Townsend, Mass, 

Y. H. Canto, medical student, Columbia University, 
N. Y. City, N. Y. 

H. L. Crane, assistant horticulturist at Plant 
House, M. A. C. 



A. F. Frost, draftsman at Bath Iron Works, 
Bath, Me. 

M. H. Munson is at present staying with his brother 
in Chicago. 

J. E. Halligan, M. A. C, Amherst, Mass. 

A. A. Harmon, Veterinary student at U. of P. 

E. T. Hull, medical student, Columbia University, 
New York city, N. Y. 

J. W. Kellogg, Amherst, Mass. 

M. B. Landers, Sup't Proctor Farms, Proctor, Vt. 

J. F. Lewis, with D. C. Potter, landscape gardner, 
Farmington, Conn. 

A. C. Monahan, graduate student. M. A. C, sub- 
stitute instructor in freshman Mathematics, M. A. C. 
Amherst, Mass. 

A. W. Morrill, graduate student, M. A. C, Am- 
herst, Mass. 

G. F. Parmenter. instructor in Chemistry at M. A. 
C, Amherst. Mass. 

F. G. Stanley, student at Tufts medical, College 
Hill, Boston, Mass. 

A. M. West, Holbrook, Mass. 
R. D. Gilbert, Gilead, Conn. 



TO THE DEAF. 

A ricli lady, cured of her Deafness and Noises in the Head 
by Dr. Nicholson's Artificial Ear Drums, gave $10,000 to his 
Institute, so that deaf people unable to procue the Ear Drums 
may have them free. Address No. 4951c The Nicholson 
Institute, 780 Eighth Avenue, New York.^U. S. A. 



Q 



DRAWING AND BLUE PROCESS PAPERS, 

SCALES, ANGLES, CURVES and T SQUARES, 

ARCHITECTS' AND DRAFTMEN'S COLORS, 

SCHOOL BOXES WATER COLORS, 



V 



INCORPORATED, 



82 and 84 Washington St., \ onQT-nM 
216 and 218 Clarendon St., / ■"^*^^^- 



Factories, MALDEN, MASS. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE. 

Mount Holyoke college opened Sept. 13 with five 
hundred and twenty-eight students. 

On Sept. 13, Northfield Seminary opened mth four 
hundred students, one hundred and fifty of whom are 
freshmen. 

Holy Cross football men have begun practice under 
Trainer H. J. Brennan and Coach Maurice Connor. 
Twenty-four men have been trying for a place on the 
team. 



Suits to order from $13.00 up. Suits pressed 50 cts. 

Pants pressed 20 cts. 

Remember these suits are jjressed not sponged or burned. 

POWERS THE TAILOR. 

Repairing, Gleaning and Altering promptly done. 

Ladies' Coats made and altered. 

Gentlemen's own goods made and trimmed in the latest style. 



Kellogg's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



50 YEARS' 

experience' 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tlous strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
Bent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
tpeeial notice, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific Hmcricati. 



A handsomely illustrated weekly. 



Largest cir- 
Terms, $3 a 



culation of any scientific journal 

year ; four months, fL Sold by all newsdealera. 

MUNN XCo.36^B'«'»«'«»y. New York 

Branch OfiBce, 625 F St., Washington. D. C. 



STUDENTS can buy at fair prices 

;, Gaps, GlovGs, Gents' Furnisigs, 

FINE READY-F^ADE SUITS. 



Suits as low as f 12. Trousers as low as f3.50. 
Overcoats as low as $10. 



& 




JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 

Fine Watch-work a Specialty. 



Second door sotith of Post Office. 



C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 

E. :n^. BKOWX, D. D. S. 



Cutler's Block, 



Amherst, Mass 



Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



OFriCE OF 



B. H. WILLIAMS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

KEAL ESTATE EOR SALE AND TO LET. 
OfiBce, Cook's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



AGGlK LIFii. 



BROKEN BRIC-A-BRACS. 

Mr. Major, the famous cement man, of New York, ex- 
plains some very interesting facts about Major's Cement. 

The multitudes who use this standard article know that it 
is many hundred per cent, better than other cements for 
which similar claims are made, but a great many do not 
know why. The simple reason is that Mr. Major uses the 
best materials ever discovered and other manufacturers do 
not use them, because they are too expensive and do not 
allow large profits. Mr. Major tells us that one of the ele- 
ments of his cement costs $3.75 a pound, and another costs 
$2.65 a gallon, while a large share of the so-called cements 
and liquid glue upon the market are nothing more than six- 
teen-cent glue, dissolved in water or citric acid, and, in some 
cases, altered slightly in color or odor by the addition of 
cheap and useless materials. 

Major's cement retails at fifteen cents and twenty-five 
cents a bottle, and when a dealer tries to sell a substitute you 
can depend upon it that his only object is to make larger 
profit. 

The profit on Major's cement is as much as any dealer 
ought to make on any cement. And this is doubly true in 
view of the fact that each dealer gets his share of the benefit 
of Mr. Major's advertising, which now amounts to over 
$5CXX) a month, throughout the country. Established in 1876. 

Insist on having Major's. Don't accept any offhand ad- 
vice from a druggist. 

If you are at all handy (and you will be likely to find that 
you are a good deal more so than you imagine) you can 
repair your rubber boots and family shoes, and any other 
rubber and leather articles, with Major's Rubber Cement and 
Major's Leather Cement. 

And you will be surprised at how many dollars a year you 
will thus save. 

If your druggist can't supply you, it will be forwarded by 
mail ; either kind. Free of postage. 



J. H. Tt^OTT, 

Plumber, Steam and Gas Fitter. 
DEgLEB IN STOVES HND BHNC«ES. 

▲OENT FOR THE CELBBKATED 

Gurney Steam and Hot Water Heaters. 

Telephone 56-4. 



C. R. EILDEIR, 

(Successor to W. W. Hunt) 



All kinds of 



HEATING, PLUMBING AND GAS WORK. 



HUNT'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST. 



Lovelly 

The Photographer, 

To the classes of '97, '98 and '99 M. A. C. MAKES A 
SPECIALTY OF COLLEGE WORK. 



Class and Athletic Groups^ &c. 

Hand Cameras and Supplies in stock, and always fresh. 
AMHERST, MASS. 



AnHa$t, Aa$$. 



fflassachusetts AgpicQltofal College. 

AT THE 

COLLEGE FARM 

WE HAVE PUEE BRED 



Perclieroii Horses ani Soutndoi Siieep, 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

E. A. JONES, Amherst, Mass. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. XI. 



AMHERST. MASS., OCTOBER 10, 1900. 



NO. 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will be sent 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

CLARENCE EVERETT GORDON, 1901, Editor-in-Chief. 
NATHAN DAVIS WHITMAN, 1901, Business Manager. 
LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, 1902, Assistant Business Manager. 

Assistant Editors. 

CHARLES LESLIE RICE, 1901. 
THOMAS CASEY, 1901. 
CHARLES MILTON KINNEY, 1902. 
CLIFFORD ALBION TINKER, 1903. 



JAMES HENRY CHICKERING, 1901. 
HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT, 1902. 
ARTHUR LINCOLN DACY, 1902. 
NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN, 1903. 



Terms: $1.00 per year in adcance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside oS United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot-Ball Association, 
CoIIegre Boarding Club, 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

G. R. Bridgeforth, Pres. Athletic Association, 
C. L. Rice, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

J. H. ChickeringSec. Nineteen Hundred and Two Index, 

Reading-Room, C. T. Leslie, Secretary. 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
C. L. Rice, Manager. 
R. W, Morse, Manager. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



Cdi'torlekls. 



With the expansion of our curriculum which will 
probably accompany the introduction of junior elec- 
tives, a thing of the future, which we no longer hesi- 
tate to speak of as doubtful, and with a broadening of 
the work in our graduate department, such as shall 
offer the greatest inducements for graduate study, 
there will probably be a demand for more definite and 
complete instruction in forestry than has yet been 
undertaken at M. A. C. A large number of men, 
and women too, are being graduated yearly from the 
forestry departments of other institutions. The work 
and study are fast assuming a permanent importance. 
Surely fewer branches of research are more closely 
related to the interests of the state and country, for 
the promotion of whose welfare the state colleges and 
experiment stations were founded, than that which 
seeks the preservation of our timber land. It is not 
unsafe to predict that the growing importance of for- 



estry as a science will make itself more fully felt in 
our midst at some not far distant time. 



On another page we publish the La Fayette (Ind.) 
Courier's comment upon the appointment of Winthrop 
Ellsworth Stone, formerly vice-chancellor and profes- 
sor of chemistry of Purdue university, to the presi- 
dency of that institution. The action of the trustees 
in making this appointment, after a careful considera- 
tion of all the attendant circumstances and conditions, 
and in view of the fact that other able and competent 
men were ready and willing to take the responsibility 
of such a prominent position, is a noble tribute to the 
character, ability, and worth of Mr. Stone. A grad- 
uate of the Massachusetts Agricultural College with 
the class of 1882, Mr. Stone has early attained to a 
leading position in the educational world. It is a 
signal honor to any man to be made the president of a 
growing, popular, and influential institution of learning. 
Distinguished predecessors in the executive chair of 
a college, as is the case with the older institutions of 



/ 



M 



AGGIE LIFE. 



New England, such as Harvard, Yale and Dartmouth, 
undoubtedly lend an added dignity, to the position of 
trust and power which the president occupies, but a 
mention of this fact can in no respect detract from 
the tribute that has been paid to Mr. Stone. The 
Life thinks that, as a college, we may be proud of the 
success of our graduate, and that we may in some 
measure, feel that we have a share in the honor which 
has been paid to him. The foundation of the manly 
and successful career which has led to so lofty a 
position must have been laid, in part at least, during 
the early days at " Aggie." As a child remembers 
home and mother so must a graduate carry with him 
ever the recollection of his alma mater and his stu- 
dent life ; and as a mother feels a pride in the attain- 
ments of her sons so ought the alma mater to cherish 
a strong interest in the successes of her graduates. 



Many of our graduates will be interested to learn 
that the Natural History Society has been reorgan- 
ized. We feel sure that could many of the old mem- 
bers speak to us they would strongly commend the 
effort. The society was founded with the idea of 
making it a sort of mutual benefit society along the 
lines of promoting an interest in nature study. The 
plan now is to adhere to the " old-fashioned " idea of 
studying the natural sciences by trips afield. The 
scope of work, however, has been made broad enough 
to include many subjects not commonly classed with 
what we at first consider to be embraced in the term 
" natural history," and this provision has been made 
with the hope that more of the fellows will ally them- 
selves with the organization so that it may become a 
flourishing society. During the winter months the 
trips afield must be discontinued but it is hoped that 
interest enough may be aroused to insure interesting 
meetings at which papers prepared by the students on 
different lines of individual research may be read and 
discussed. It is also hoped that the society may in 
addition to these lines of work provide a series of lec- 
tures upon live and interesting subjects to be given at 
regular intervals during the winter term. The society 
has been duly organized by the election of officers 
and the enrollment of about fifteen members. A ver> 
interesting meeting was held Friday evening, October 
5th, Professors Lull, Stone, and Fernald were present 
and each had an encouraging word. The students 



are urged to attend the next meeting which will be 
held next Friday evening, October 12th. Some mat- 
ters left over from the last meeting will be discussed as 
also the plan of having a trip afield some time in the 
near future. The field for work and study along the 
lines of botany and geology in the Connecticut valley 
is not to be surpassed in this state. The valley is 
especially rich in its flora, and the studies in geologi- 
cal formation and paleontological vestiges are exceed- 
ingly interesting and instructive. 



DR. WINTHROP E. STONE. 

Dr. Winthrop E. Stone was born in 1862, in the 
town of Chesterfield, N. H. His early boyhood was 
spent in his native place where he enjoyed the usual 
school facilities. Mr. Stone, the father, that his sons 
might enjoy better school privileges, moved to 
Amherst. Mass., in 1874. Here Winthrop received 
further public schooling for four years. In 1878 he 
entered the Massachusetts Agricultural College, grad- 
uating four years later with honors, and with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Science. 

In 1882, immediately after graduation, he went to 
Mountainville, N. Y. entering upon the work of agri- 
cultural chemistry in a private experiment station. At 
the end of two years he returned to Amherst and 
entered the Hatch Experiment Station under Dr. 
Goessmann. In 1886, he took his degree of Bache- 
lor of Science from Boston University and went 
abroad to continue advanced work in chemistry and 
botany. He gradually gave up his study of botany, 
however, and devoted his whole time to chemistry^ 
He became a member of the university at Gottingen, 
studying under the direction of V. Meyer, Tollens, 
Berthold, and their colleagues. In 1888, he was grad- 
uated with the degree of Ph. D., and immediately 
upon his return to the United States, was appointed 
chemist in the experiment station of the University of 
Tennessee at Knoxville. In September. 1889, he 
was called to fill the chair of Chemistry at Purdue 
University, Lafayette, Ind. 

In his work at Purdue, Dr. Stone has greatly devel- 
oped his department besides making various 
researches, the results of which have been published, 
in scientific journals both in this country and abroad. 
In 1892, he was made vice-president by appointment 
of the trustees, since which time his services have 



AGGIE LIFE. 



15 



been absorbed In a constantly increasing degree In 
administering the affairs of the college. In late years 
he became President Smart's chief assistant, being 
frequently called upon to take charge of matters of 
greatest importance. During the greater part of the 
two years of President Smart's failing health the 
entire burden of the university rested upon him. In 
July, 1900, he was appointed by the trustees to the 
presidency of the institution. 

Dr. Stone was married June 24th, 1889, at Knox- 
ville, Tenn., to Miss Victoria Heitmiiller of Gottingen, 
Germany. Previous to her marriage Miss Heitmiiller 
had taught at Andover Seminary. Dr. Stone is a 
member of numerous learned and scientific societies. 
He is a member of the State Teachers' association, 
was president of the State College association for 
1899, and has served frequently as a member of the 
State Board of education of which he now becomes 
an ex-officio member. He was for three years presi- 
dent of the West Side school board. Mrs. Stone is 
very active in the social life of the college community, 
of which she is a very popular member. 



(From the Lafayette Daily Courier.) 
The Courier need not say that it is gratified that 
Dr. W. E. Stone has been chosen for the presidency 
of Purdue university. That it should feel so Is well 
understood in this community. This paper has a be- 
lief in the wisdom of the decision of the board of 
trustees and an abiding faith in the capabilities of the 
man to whom such signal honor has been given. 
Commenting on the board's decision in March to de- 
lay the choice until there might be a thorough inves- 
tigation of the qualifications of candidates it was said 
in these columns : 

" If the compliment of choice shall later be paid to 
Professor Stone, as the Cowr/'er believes it ought to 
be, it will be all the greater for careful weighing of 
every requirement by the trustees." 

The greater compliment has come. That it was 
deserved is evidenced by the fact that there was 
unanimous choice after months of consistent investi- 
gation and cautious consideration of a list of nearly a 
half hundred names, in connection with the appoint- 
ment. The promotion is a great one and carries with 
it many responsibilities, but it comes as the reward of 



merit, and is an encouragement to such devotion to 
duty as has characterized Professor Stone's connec- 
tion with the university. He brings to the presidency 
of Purdue a close knowledge of the workings of the 
institution, an acquaintance with its greatest needs, a 
vigorous and and upright manhood, a knowledge of 
necessary discipline, and an educational wisdom all- 
sufficient for the task. In less important positions 
Dr. Stone has been an enthusiast for Purdue. As its 
president it is confidently assumed that his efforts 
will be enlarged to the full limit. He has been the 
acting president since Dr. Smart's death, and prior to 
that time there devolved upon him many of the 
duties of the higher position. That there has 
been intelligent discharge of duty is shown by the fact 
that Purdue has continued to grow in reputation and 
in attendance. The university will keep on growing, 
and Dr. Stone will grow with it, and for it. Congrat- 
ulations are extended to the new president, but more 
especially does the Courier desire to congratulate the 
university, its trustees, faculty, instructors, and stu- 
dents, and the general public on a selection that 
means continued educational prosperity and growth. 



GEORGE H. TUCKER. 

Not having received any authentic data until a few 
days ago we have been unable heretofore to publish 
anything but a short notice of the decease of Mr. 
Tucker. We are pleased, however, even at this late 
date, to publish a few facts concerning his life. 

Mr. George H. Tucker was graduated from the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College with the class of 
'71. After leaving college he went to the oil fields of 
Pennsylvania and there engaged in the business of 
sinking oil wells, but after three years, not finding the 
undertaking a profitable one, he joined the United 
States Army in Dakota. He remained in the ser- 
vice for seven years. With a change of administra- 
tion he returned to Pennsylvania, taking up farming 
and surveying. Later he became city engineer for 
the city of Corry. A year ago he suffered a severe 
attack of hemorrhage of the bowels. He was not 
able to rally and passed away October 1st, 1899. 

Mr. Tucker was married, May 15th, 1899, to Mrs. 
Ella Kew, formerly Miss Ella Tubbs of Titusville, 
Penn. He left one child, Catherine Viola, born 
March 15th, 1891. 



i6 



AGGIE LIFE, 



^olle;^^ Pot^S' 



— Allen and Halligan have entered the Sophomore 
class. 

— President Goodell spent three or four days last 
week in Boston. 

— Lewis, 1902, has returned to College, being late 
on account of illness. 

— The battalion has been having extended order 
drill several times of late. 

— Eight Juniors and and two Freshmen attended 
the County fair at Greenfield. 

— Hereafter the sophomore German will be held 
in the Veterinary laboratory building. 

— E. McCobb, 1902, has returned to College after 
a prolonged vacation of about three weeks. 

— Professor Babson has taken charge of the de- 
partment of declamation in all four classes of the 
College. 

— Coach Murphy left Wednesday morning for the 
West. The foot-ball teams practiced at seven in the 
morning. 

— The reading-room periodicals and newspapers 
were sold at auction in the chapel Wednesday 
evening. 

— A meeting was held in the Zoological room on 
on Friday evening for the purpose of reorganizing the 
Natural History Society. 

— Mrs. L. E. Sanderson is training the College 
choir and glee club. The freshman class has swelled 
the number of voices to about 15. 

— At last the Military Department has taken into 
hand the students' system of illuminating their rooms 
by means of numerous wire taps and extensions. 

— The Rev. Mr. Day of the Unity church was in- 
stalled Friday afternoon, a reception being held from 
8 to 10, at which several of the students ushered. 

— The President is gathering to the College library 
the histories of all the towns and cities in the State 
that have their histories published. In this collection 
it Is apparent that we will find the history of our Com- 
monwealth. Such a history will be found invalu- 
able in years to come. 



- — The burning of the mountain house on Mt. Tom, 
Monday evening, was distinctly visible from Amherst. 
The fire when at its height made a most beautiful 
sight. 

— The Seniors have chosen the following officers 
for the ensuing term : Pres't, E. S. Gamwell ; vice- 
president, E. L. Macomber; sec'y and treas., J. H. 
Chickering. 

— There is some rumor of organizing a military 
surveilliance over the College grounds, the commis- 
sioned officers acting in turn one day of every week 
as officers of the day. 

— The foot-ball field has been surveyed and the 
goal-post at the dormitory end has been changed to 
its correct position. It was somewhat over its own 
width too far to the east. 

— Gates and Hall, 1902, have been obliged to cul- 
tivate a liking for the .dormitory once more and are 
rooming in number 8 South College, Sawin, 1904, 
having moved to number 15. 

- — The democrats held a rousing meeting in the 
chapel the other night and in spite of the strong re- 
ligious tendencies they managed to discuss with 
strength the arguments of their party, 

— The following officers have been elected by the 
Junior class : Pres't, Dacy ; vice pres't, Dellea ; 
sec'y and treas., Chase ; class captain, Paul ; histo- 
rian. Knight, and sergeant-at-arms. Church. 

— The class of 1903 have elected the following 
officers : Pres't, Snell ; vice pres't. Bacon ; sec'y and 
treas., Jones; sergeant-at-arms. Brooks; foot-ball 
captain, Snell ; rope-pull and class captain, Barrus. 

— Of the two prizes offered for college floats, in the 
coaching parade, the first was awarded to the Experi- 
ment Station department and the second to the Farm 
department. They consisted of ten and five dollars, 

— The Christian Endeavor society of the first Con- 
gregational church tendered a reception to the enter- 
ing classes of the colleges. A musical program was 
rendered which helped to make a very enjoyable 
evening. 

— The M. A. C. Athletic Board has elected the 
following officers : President, Dr. J. B. Paige ; vice- 
president. Prof. W. P. Brooks; member on the Board, 
executive Prof. R. S. Lull; auditor, Prof. S. F. 
Howard. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



17 



— The drill hall is undergoing some needed im- 
provements. The recitation-room will be steam 
heated, thus putting an end to those recesses caused 
by the stove failing to work. A lavatory has also 
been added. 

— The freshman class has elected the following 
officers : Pres't. Raymoth ; vice pres't, Staples ; 
sec'y and treas., Griffin ; class captain, Kelliher; foot- 
ball captain, Pierce ; rope-pull captain, Lewis ; histo- 
rian, Witherell, and sergeant-at-arms. Gay. 

— The Department of Vegetable Pathology and 
Physiology of the Hatch Experiment station will soon 
issue a bulletin giving the results of several years 
experiments with the lettuce plant. The portion 
treating with the effect of atmospheric electricity on 
the growth of the plant will be particularly interesting, 

— The cadet band has been organized as follows : 
Allen, '03, baritone ; Handy, '04, cymbals ; Henry, 
'01, second alto; Kirby, '04, E flat bass; Parker, 
'04, second B flat cornet; Pease, '04, solo Bflat cor- 
net ; Peck, '04, first alto ; Pierce, '04, B flat bass ; 
Robertson, '03, second tenor; Smith, '02, soio B flat 
cornet ; Tottlngham, '03, first tenor ; Webster, '03, 
snare drum; West, '02, piccolo; West, M. H., '03, 
first B flat cornet; Witherel. bass drum. Mr. Wm. 
Day of Greenfield will act as instructor. The ex- 
pense of music, and of instruction, which will consist 
of a two hour lesson once every week, will be borne 
by the College. 



FOURTEENTH ANNUAL REUNION AND BAN- 
QUET OF THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRI- 
CULTURAL COLLEGE CLUB OF 
NEW YORK. 

At the St. Denis Hotel, Dec. 8th, 1899, the Club 
held one of its largest reunions. 

The toastmaster was Charles E. Beach, '82, presi- 
dent of the Club. 

The guests were President Goodell, Prof. Henry 
W. Parker, Prof. William H. Brewer of Yale, Wil- 
liam Ives Washburn, Esq., Amherst '76, Prof. A. C. 
Washburne, and Prof. Herman Babson. 

The toastmaster was very felicitous in his introduc- 
tory remarks. The only farmer present, he enjoyed 
himself greatly making fun of the pseudo agriculturists 
before him. 



President Goodell spoke for the College, and also 
read his essay on "How the pay of the Regiment 
was carried to New Orleans," carrying us back to the 
days when we used to listen to his lectures on history 
by this stirring account of his practical experience in 
war time. 

Prof. Parker made a short address in his usual 
effective manner. 

Prof. William H. Brewer of Yale responded in an 
exceedingly attractive talk on the changes which had 
occurred in agricultural education in this country. 
He said that he was probably the first teacher of agri- 
culture in any institution here, and specially noted the 
great attention now paid to nature studies, and the 
annual hegira of the people from the cities to the 
mountains, thus getting close to nature and studying 
the places which the Ancients used to call the " abode 
of demons," claiming that these changes in studies 
and customs were due in part to the forces which had 
prompted the great extension of college work in the 
natural and mechanical sciences. 

Mr. William Ives Washburn (Amherst '76) was 
introduced as a representative of Amherst College 
Alumni, having been president of the New York Asso- 
ciation within a few years. Mr. V/ashburn spoke at 
length in a most cordial manner, stating how he had 
known of the foundation and growth of our Alma 
Mater, as in his boyhood days he had lived in the 
town of Amherst ; he alluded humorously and pictur- 
esquely to the somewhat forced relations which had 
existed in times past, between the students of the two 
institutions, and called attention to the fact that the 
students of both colleges to-day knew almost nothing 
of the workings and equipment of their sister college, 
which he much deplored. He spoka seriously of the 
duties of all college men in promoting morality and 
education, and thanked the Club for the courtesy 
shown him as a guest. 

Prof. Herman Babson of the College, also a grad- 
uate of Amherst, was enthusiastic in noting the splen- 
did work being done by our Alma Mater ; that the 
College was filling a place in teaching the so-called 
natural sciences, which no other institution in the 
country that he knew of, occupied ; a loyal son of 
Amherst College, it was his pleasure and duty to bear 
tribute to the value and merit of our Alma Mater. 

Prof. A. C Washburiie, formerly of the College 



i8 



AGGIE LIFE. 



and now of the Actuarial Department of the Metro- 
politan Life Insurance Company, made a brief address. 

Prof. William P. Brooks, 75, spoke with great 
force and clearness of the undergraduate life and of 
how things were shaping into better conditions through- 
out the College. 

Short addresses were made by other members of 
the Club. 

The Fifteenth Annual Banquet will take place at the 
Hotel St. Denis, Broadway and 1 1th St., Friday even- 
ing, December 7th, at 6-30 o'clock. As usual mem- 
bers of the faculty will be present and it is hoped to 
obtain besides President Goodell, Ex-President Stock- 
bridge and Prof. Goessmann. It is also planned to 
have as a chief guest Winthrop Ellsworth Stone, Ph. 
D., '82, who has recently been elected president of 
the Purdue University in Indiana. He is the first 
alumnus to be promoted to such an important position, 
the University being a very strong institution of learn- 
ing in the middle West. We also expect to have 
representatives of Amherst, Williams, Lafayette, 
Pennsylvania and a Cornell alumni. 

There are to be no long speeches. The dinner 
will be purely informal. The best of fellowship will 
prevail and we will not only renew our youth in remi- 
niscences of the past but we will be enabled to 
acquaint the alumni of other institutions that there is 
such a college as our Alma Mater. 

The dinner tickets are $3.00. No one may be- 
come a member of the Club unless he shall attend a 
reunion of the same. 

If attention is paid to the list of the members of 
the Club, it will be seen that the most enthusiastic 
supporters are the older alumni. It is highly desirous 
that the younger alumni who are coming into New 
York and its vicinity and actively engaging in business 
and professional work should be enrolled amongst the 
members of the Club. 

Let all loyal sons of the M. A. C. attend! If the 
older members can come from Connecticut and 
Massachusetts, certainly the younger members in and 
about New York should put in an appearance. 

All remittances should be addressed to the Treas- 
urer, Mr. A. L. Fowler, 1 19 Mercer St., New York 
City, on or before the 2nd of December. Please see 
Article III, Sec. 2, Article IV, Sec. 2 and Article 
VI 11, Sec, 4 of the Constitution. 



CONSTITUTION. 

ARTICLE I. NAME. 

This Club shall be known as the MASSACHU- 
SETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE CLUB of 
New York. 

ARTICLE II. OBJECTS. 

The objects of this Club shall be : 

1. The promotion of agriculture. 

2. The advancement of the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College. 

3. The uniting of its members for mutual improve- 
ment and social fellowship. 

ARTICLE III. MEMBERSHIP. 

Section 1 . There shall be two classes of mem- 
bers : (a) active members ; (b) honorary members. 

Sec. 2. Active membership is open to all former 
students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
and to all who have been or are connected with its 
Boards of instruction and government. The names 
of all such who shall attend any Banquet as a guest of 
the Club, or by paying the Banquet fee, shall be 
placed on the active membership roll. 

S9C. 3. Honorary membership may be conferred 
by a unanimous vote of the Executive Committee. 

Sec. 4. The Club by a two-thirds vote at the an- 
nual meeting may expel a member. 

Sec. 5. Any member may resign by sending his 
letter of resignation to the Secretary, provided he is 
not in arrears to the Club. 

ARTICLE IV. DUES. 

Sec. 1. Honorary members shall be exempt from 
the payment of admission fee and dues, and shall 
enjoy all the privileges of active members, except that 
they shall not vote nor hold office ; nor shall they 
have any right or title to, nor interest in the property 
or assets of the Club. 

Sec. 2. The banquet fee shall be three dollars, 
and the Executive Committee shall reserve plates for 
those who pay said fee, five days or more before the 
banquet, to the Secretary-Treasurer. 

ARTICLE V. OFFICERS. 

Sec. 1. The officers of this Club shall be a Presi- 
dent, aVice-President,Second and Third Vice-Presi- 
dents, a Secretary-Treasurer, a Choragus and an 
Historian, which collectively shall constitute the Ex- 



AGGIE LIFE. 



19 



ecutive Committee of the Club and shall be elected 
by ballot at the annual meeting to serve from the 
adjournment of said meeting to the adjournment of 
of the next. 

ARTICLE VI. DUTIES OF OFFICERS. 

Sec. 1 . The President shall preside at all meet- 
ings of the Club and Executive Committee. 

Sec. 2. In the absence of the President, the Vice- 
Presidents shall perform his duties in the order of 
their seniority. 

Sec. 3. The Secretary-Treasurer shall act as the 
Correspondent of the Clab, and handle the funds sub- 
ject to the order of the Executive Committee. 

Sec. 4. The Choragus shall have supervision of 
music at the Club reunions. 

Sec. 5. The Historian shall record the meetings 
of the Club and the Histories of its members. 

ARTICLE VII. POWERS OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

The Executive Committee shall have power : 

1. To fill any vacancy among the officers by a 
majority vote of those present at any regular meeting. 

2. To make purchases and contracts for the Club, 
but it shall have no power, unless specially authorized, 
to render the Club or any member thereof liable for 
any debt beyond the amount of money which shall at 
the time of contracting such debt be in the treasury, 
and not needed for the discharge of prior debts and 
liabilities. 

3. To invite guests to the meetings of the Club, 
and transact any other business which does not con- 
flict with this constitution. 

ARTICLE VIII. MEETINGS. 

Sec. 1. The Annual Meeting and Banquet of the 
Club shall be held in December, at a time and place 
to be appointed by the Executive Committee. 

Sec. 2. Special Meetings and Banquets of the 
Club may be called by the Executive Committee for 
the promotion of its objects. 

Sec. 3. Meetings of Executive Committee shall 
be held whenever needed. Three members shall con- 
stitute a quorum. 

Sec. 4. No assessments or collections shall be 
imposed or made at any meeting of the Club. 

ARTICLES IX. AMENDMENTS. 

Sec. 1. This Constitution may be amended by 
two-thirds vote of the Club at any annual meeting. 



ARTICLE X. PROPERTY. 

Sec. I . The legal title to all property, effects and 
assets of the Club shall be vested in the Executive 
Committee. 

Sec. 2. The Corporate Seal of the Club shall be. 

/ithletic No-t?s- 



Aggie, ; Holy Cross, 6. 

On Sept. 22 Aggie played her first game with Holy 
Cross on the latter's field. The result was a victory 
for the home team, but the showing of our boys was 
such that we feel much encouraged with our team. 
Being the first game, both teams were a bit green and 
the play lacked in snap and dash. The Holy Cross 
men were inclined to dirty play, and were penalized 
several times, one man being disqualified by the 
umpire. 

Aggie had the ball her full share of the time keep., 
ing it in the Worcester territory all of the second half. 
She was able to gain through the line and around the 
ends, but was weak at critical moments. Lack of 
generalship was also a feature of her play. 

Holy Cross made gains through our line and around 
one end, but could not get round Bodfish. The fea- 
tures of the game were the defensive work of Bodfish 
and Snell and the work of O. Sullivan at end. The 
line-up : 

AGGIE. HOLY CROSS. 

Dellea, Kelliher. r. e. r. e., 0. Sullivan 

Cooke, r. t. r. t., O'Rouke 

Gamwell, r. g. r. g., Toohig 

Paul, c. c MacCabe 

Snell, 1. g. 1. g., Conner 

Halligan, 1. t. 1. t., Grady 

Bodfish, 1. e. 1. e.. Rice 

Whitman, q. b. q. b., G'Halihan 

Barry, r. h. b. r. h. b., Sullivan 

Chickering, 1. h. b. 1. h. b., Murphy 

Halligan., f. b. f. b., Reilly 

Referee — Mercer. Umpire — Rice. Linesmen — Belden, 

Shay. Timers — Call, Gates. Touchdown — Murphy. Goal 
from touchdown — Reilly. Time — 20 and 15 minute halves. 

Aggie, 12; Worcester Academy, 0. 
On Sept. 29, Aggie defeated the Worcester Acad- 
emy by the above score. The teams were about 
equal in weight, the Worcester team having the ad- 
vantage in the rush line while Aggie was a bit heavier 
back of the line. 



20 



AGGIE LIFE. 



This game was a surprising one, showing up the 
strong and weak points of our team very plainly. It 
proved that we were stronger on defense than before, 
and also proved that our backs are not as strong in 
interference as before. 

Cooke won the toss and had Worcester kick-off 
the first half. Aggie immediately lost the ball by a 
fumble. Worcester was held for downs but recov- 
ered the ball and rushed to our three-yard line. Then 
our team held and from there rushed the ball the 
length of the field for a touchdown by Snell, which 
was the only score for the first half. Barry kicked 
the goal. 

Worcester kicked off in the second half. Aggie 
held for downs and rushed the ball down the field, 
scoring in about five minutes of play. Barry again 
kicked the goal. For the rest of the time the ball 
stayed in the center of the field, a few kicks being 
exchanged but nothing decisive being done. 

The features of the game were the defensive work 
of the Aggie team and the running of J. H. Chickering 
who was easily the star. The line-up : 



AGGIE. 

Dellea, r. e. 

Cooke, r. t. 

Gamwell, Bridgeforth, r. g. 

Paul. c. 

Snell, 1. g, 

Halligan, 1. t. 

Bodfish, Kelliher, 1. t. 

Whitman, q. b. 

Barry, r. h. b. 

Chickering, 1. h. b. 

Lewis, f. b. 



WORCESTER ACADEMY. 

r. e., Kruse 

r. t., Davis 

r. g., Sheehan 

c. Reboli 

1. g., Perkins 

1. t.. Hall 

1. t., Phillips 

q. b., Marshall 

r. h. b., Edwards 

1. h. b.. Dignomtry 

f. b., Chickering 



Touchdows — Snell 2. Goals from touchdowns — Barry 2. 
Referee — Halligan. Umpire — Emory. Timer — Nelson. 
Linesmen — Gates, Campbell. Time — two 15 minute halves. 

Aggie Scrub, 14; Wesleyan Academy, 0. 

On Monday, Oct. 1 , the Aggie Scrub played a 
game with Wesleyan Academy at Wilbraham, win- 
ning 14 to 0. The Academy team was heavier but 
lacked training. The scrub had an easy game win- 
ning easily and holding the Academy boys at all points. 

Balden, captain of the scrub, was the star of the 
aggregation. The line-up. 



AGGIE. 

Kelliher, 1. e. 
Dawson, 1. t. 
Pierson, 1. g. 



WESLEYAN. 

r. e., Sikes 

r. t., McCaw 

r. g., Wheaton 



Bridgeforth, c. 
Barnes, r. g. 
Jones, r. t. 
Pierce, r. e. 
Dellea, q. b. 
Belden, 1. h. b. 
Bowler, r. h. b. 
Chase, f. b. 

Score — Aggie 14, Wesleyan 0. 



c, Reynolds 

1. g., Kimball 

1. t. Russell 

1. e.. La Forge 

q. b., Kennedy, Wilcox 

r. h. b., Lansing 

1. h. b., Wilkins, Luce 

f. b,, Coote 

Touchdowns — Dawson, 



Chase. Goals from touchdowns- — Pierson 2. Referee — H. 
B. Davis. Umpire — Gates. Linesmen — Campbell, Holmes. 
Time — 15 and 10 minute halves. 

Aggie, 50 ; Norwich, 0. 

Last Saturday, the 6th, Aggie defeated Norwich 
University by an overwhelming score. In spite of 
the heat the game was fast, six touchdowns being 
scored in the first half. Norwich was weak on de- 
fense and at no time was able to hold for downs. Her 
play was characterized by the weakness of the line 
and the strength of her backs, especially the fullback 
Tuck, who did some very pretty tackling. 

Cooke won the toss and defended the south goal. 
Norwich kicked off and Whitman carried the ball to 
the center of the field. By means of end runs and 
line plunges the ball was carried over the line for a 
touchdown after tour minutes of play. The rest of 
the half was a mere repetition, five more touchdowns 
being made and three goals kicked from them. 

Aggie kicked off, the second half, and held for 
downs getting the ball on Norwich's twenty-five yard 
line ; from there the ball was rushed over for a touch- 
down in about three minutes of play. Two more 
touchdowns and one goal ended the scoring and the 
game. 

The features of the game were the brilliant work 
of Chickering for Aggie and the tackling of Tuck for 
Norwich. 

AGGIE. Norwich'. 

Dellea, McCobb. Pierce, 1. e. r. e., Hazen 

Halligan, 1. t. r. t.. Fuller 

Pierson, Gamwell, 1. g. r. g., Holden 

Paul, Bridgeforth, c. c, Smith 

Snell. r. g. 1. g., Carr 

Cooke, r. t. 1. t.. Chamberlain 

Bodfish, Kelleher, r. e. 1. e., Wheatley 

Whitman, Dellea, q. b. q. b.. Strong 

Chickering, 1. h. b. r. h. b.. Burr 

Barry, r. h. b. 1. h. b., Watson 

Lewis, f. b. f. b., Tuck 

Score — Aggie 50, Norwich 0. Umpire — Ball of Nor- 
wich. Referee — Halligan, M. A. C. Linesmen — Gates, M. 
A. C, Metzer, Norwich. Touchdowns — Chickering 4, Snell, 
Halligan, Barry, Lewis and Cooke. Goals — Barry 5. Time 
— 15 and 20 minute halves. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



21 



ALMUS PATER. 

We sing of Alma Mater's care. 
Of loyal sons, and daughters fair, 
Of how we love that matron stern, 
And all her precepts strive to learn ; 
But Almus Pater, where is he ? 
Was Almus Pater lost at sea ? 
Or eaten on some savage isle 
Where he had gone a little while. 
Like poor old Rip, to escape the tongue 
That Alma Mater ceaseless swung ? 
Or did he die a natural death, 
Simply forgetting to draw his breath ? 
Or, as the facts would seem to point, 
Are he and Alma out of joint ? 
Do they in exile live apart. 
Who should be joined hand and heart ? 

Of Almus Pater we never hear, 

He never seems to interfere 

In the management of frisky youth. 

He never enters the halls of Truth, 

And like the "Old Woman in the Shoe," 

Poor Alma has it all to do. 

And truly 'tis a wondrous task. 

If you are skeptic please to ask. 

If always you have kept the law. 

Then you're the first I ever saw. 

Now I propose, ye loyal sons. 

That straightway we secure the funds 

To start a search for Almus Pater 

To make him work for Alma Mater. 

— C. L. F. P. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

A complete set of Robert Louis Stevenson's work 
has lately been added to the library. You are all 
acquainted with this author, he needs no introduction 
and his works are familiar to you all. They are in- 
structive as well as amusing, and while passing away a 
few idle hours In company with one of Stevenson's 
books the reader is unconsciously adding new words 
to his vocabulary and new ideas to his thoughts. A 
wide range of thought is included in these volumes 
and everyone can find something suited to his taste. 
Upon the beauty and style of writing no comment is 
necessary. 

" In a Walled Garden," by Bessie Rayner Belloc. 
In company with this authoress we are introduced to 
many of the prominent and world renowned men and 
women of Europe ; with her we visit Rome, Paris and 
other historical cities, battles are viewed and battle- 



fields, now peaceful and quiet, wandered over. Scenes 
are described in glowing terms well adapted to the 
subjects discussed, people are almost made to stand 
before the reader and their correspondence gives us 
an insight into their character. The fact that many 
of the subjects discussed are new for a woman to 
attempt makes the work all the more praise-worthy. 

" Bird Studies with a Camera," by Frank M. Chap- 
man. To study birds, their form, size and habits by 
means of a camera is practically a new idea and as it 
is new no one can be considered as an authority upon 
the subject. To say that the author of this book has 
been successful in his venture is to say the least that 
can be said. To obtain a good study of the bird, the 
snapshot reproduction is usually enlarged to three 
times the original size. This brings out the minute 

details very clearly. There is an uncertainty about 
such a study that makes it exceedingly interesting 
and good results can be obtained without loss of life. 
The book is v/ell written and fully illustrated. 

"From North Pole to Equator," Studies of 
Wild Life and Scenes in many lands by Alfred E. 
Brehm. The author inherited his love for nature from 
his father who was an accomplished ornithologist and 
at an early age the boy was accustom.ed to rambling 
through the woods with his father learning the mean- 
ings of the various sounds. While he was yet a young 
man he began his scientific explorations ; he visited 
Africa, Lapland, Spain and Abyssinia. The results 
of the expeditions were given to the public in the 
form of lectures written in German. These have 
been collected and translated to make up this book. 
Of the separate lectures " The Migration of the Mam- 
mals " is exceptionally good while the one on " Apes 
and Monkeys " I do not think always according to 
the best authorities of this time. Incidents of travel 
are cited, pictures are painted and descriptions given 
which make it very interesting and exceedingly in- 
structive. The book is fully illustrated but all the 
illustrations are not true to nature. 

y Education in the United States." This consists of 
a series of monographs prepared for the United States 
exhibit at the Paris Exposition. It includes every- 
thing relative to education from the time when the 
government first took control of the matter, giving 
statistics of what the government has accomplished. 



22 



AGGIE LIFE. 



through the establishment of our great American 
universities and even discussing the Literature of 
Education. Each individual subject is treated in an 
exhaustive manner by some of the noted leaders in 
our great institutions. As each subject is treated by 
a different person the style of each will necessarily 
differ slightly ; but as each v/riter writes all there is to 
be written on his subject the book as a whole is very 
complete. It is published in two volumes. 



In-tercolle^iat^. 



Columbia has added a school of Diplomacy to her 
curriculum. 

Ten students at Yale are taking the newly estab- 
lished courses of the College of Forestry. 

The Boston College eleven has been obliged to dis- 
band without playing a game, owing to financial 
troubles. 

Smith college celebrated its twenty-fifth anniversary 
last week with elaborate ceremoies. It is the oldest, 
largest and one of the best known of the women's 
colleges. 

At the University of Missouri, the technical courses 
require an equal amount of shop-work from both 
sexes. It is said that the co-eds. soon become very 
proficient. 

The entrance requirements at West Point have 
been very materially raised. In the past they have 
been low, though the subsequent courses are ex- 
tremely hard. 

The entering class of the University of Vermont 
numbers 81 of whom 12 are co-eds. This is a slight 
increase over former years. Military drill has been 
temporarily suspended. 

An interesting custom exists at Harvard. Early in 
the fall term each upper classman selects a dozen or 
more Freshmen whom he entertains and acts as 
sponsor for, during the remainder of the year. 

The Engineering Division of the Junior class of M. 
I. T. has been engaged recently in laying out an im- 
aginary railway across the town of Wellesley. It is 
said that the obstacles causing the greatest delay in 
the work were encountered while passing tbe Welles- 
ley College campus. 



The students of Amherst college by a vote of 296 
to 33 recently decided to abolish the cane rush be- 
tween the Sophomores and Freshmen. In the last 
rush one of the Freshmen was seriously injured. 
Something less dangerous will be substituted, 
but what this will be has not yet been determined. 



uiT^ni. 



75. — Class president, Mr. A. A. Southwick, Hos- 
pital for the Insane, Taunton ; secretary, Dr. Madison 
Bunker, 17 Park St.. Nekton. 

Ex-'75. — William S. Lyon is General Superintend- 
ent of the Census takers for the Division of Agricul- 
ture in California, Arizona, Florida and the Gulf States. 

'77. — George E. Nye is with Swift & Co., Chicago. 
Residence at No. 420 East 42d St. 

'78. — Charles F. Coburn, city treasurer and col- 
lector of taxes for the city of Lowell, has resigned 
his position because of ill health. The city council, 
after accepting Mr Coburn's resignation, expressed 
thanks for faithful services, and earnestly wished his 
restoration to health and continued activity in the 
community. 

'82. — Class president. Dr. James B. Paige, 
Amherst ; class secretary, George D. Howe, North 
Hadley. Prof. C. S. Plumb, of Purdue University, 
spent the summer traveling in England and Europe. 

'83. — E. A. Bishop, Superintendent of the Agricul- 
tural department at Talledega college was thrown from 
his horse early in the spring and sustained serious 
injuries. He came North as soon as he was able to 
travel and underwent a successful operation in Boston. 
The operation was performed by Dr. J. E. Goldthwait, 
'85. Mr. Bishop returned to his duties in September, 
much improved in health. 

'83. — D. O. Nourse, Professor of Agriculture at the 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute spent the month of July 
and August with friends in the North. He visited the 
college the latter part of July. Prof. Nourse has 
recently completed a model barn in connection with 
his department. A full description of the structure 
is found in a recent bulletin of the Virginia station. 

'85. — George H. Barker is assistant surgeon on the 
Monongahela. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



23 



'86. — Richard F. Duncan, Physician at 5 Norwich 
Ave., Providence, R. I. 

'92. — George B. Willard married to Miss Aiice W. 
Barton of Waltham, Sept. 4. 

NINETY-THREE. 

E, C. Howard married Aug. 22, to Miss Ella 
Kenedy of Woburn. The couple will reside at New 
Hartford, Conn. 

Class president, Dr. Charles A. Goodrich, Hartford, 
Conn.; class secretary, Fred A. Smith, Lynn. The 
class of '93 held a reunion in Amherst on June 18, 
1900. The entering class numbered forty-two, but 
only twenty-one were graduated. Six of their number 
have passed away ; thirteen are married. The class- 
cup is held by R. Blood Melendy, and was presented 
at the last reunion. The next reunion of the class 
will be held in 1903. 

Baker, Joseph. Dairying, Riverside Farm. New 
Boston, Conn. 

Bartlett, Fred G. Sexton Forestdale cemetery, 
corner Cabot and Sycamore Sts. Holyoke, Mass. 

Clark, Henry D. Veterinary Surgeon, 12 Mechanic 
St., Fitchburg, Mass. 

Curley, Geo. F. Physician and Surgeon, 234 
Main St., Milford. 

Davis, Herbert C. Postal Clerk, R. R., 99 Trin- 
ity Ave., Atlanta. Ga. 

Goodrich, Charles A. Physician and Surgeon, 5 
Haynes St., Hartford, Conn. 

Harlow, Francis T. Farming, Marshfield, Box 106. 

Harlow, Henry J. Dairying, West Boylston. 

Hawkes, Ernest A. Christian Crusader, corner 4th 
& Broad Sts., Richmond, Va. 

Henderson, Frank H. Civil Engineer, 49 Meridian 
St., Maiden. 

Howard, Edwin C. Principal schools, New Hart- 
ford, Conn. 

Hoyt, Franklin S. Supervising principal schools, 
91 Alden Ave., New Haven, Conn. 

Lehnret, Eugene A. Veterinary Surgeon, 86 
Church St., Clinton. 

Melendy, Alphonso E. Farming, Sterling Junction. 

Perry, John R. Interior Decorator, 8 Bosworth St., 
Boston. 



Smith, Colton A, Secretary and Treasurer, N. B. 
Blackston Co., dry goods, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Smith, Fred A. Florist and Market Gardener, 265 
Euclid Ave.. Lynn. 

Smith, Luther W. Highland Farm, Marten, 111. 

Staples, Henry F. Physician and Surgeon, Solon. 
Ohio. 

Tinaco, Luiz A. T. Sugar Planter, Camps, Rio 
Janeiro, Brazil. 

'94.— Louis W. Barker is with T. J. Kelley, Gen- 
eral Contractor, at 120 Washington St., Brookline. 

'94. — Fred L. Greene is teaching in the public 
schools of New York. Address 410 West 1 15th St. 

'94. — C. P. Lounsbury has returned to South 
Africa after a four months stay in this country. Mr. 
Lounsbury who is chief entomologist for the British 
government at Cape Colony was sent to this country 
to study the methods of the principal entomological 
stations ; he has completed his study, having paid 
especial attention to the stations in California where 
the conditions are similar to those in South Africa. 

'95. — Class president, Jasper Marsh, Danvers ; 
class secretary, A. B. Smith, Ravenswood, Chicago, 
111.; corresponding secretary, Henry A. Ballou, Storrs, 
Conn. 

'95. — Charles M. Dickenson, seedsman and florist 
at 76-78 Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 

'95. — Henry W. Lewis is in the Park Department 
civil engineers office, Havana, Cuba, under Col. Black. 
Address, Tacon 3, Havana, Cuba, Care Col. M. 
Black. 

'96. — Merle E. Sellew, student in the course for 
nurses, Boston City Hospital. 

'96. — Frank L. Clapp, with the Metropolitan Water 
Board. Address No. 15, Mount Vernon St., Boston. 

'97. — P. H. Smith has been transferred to the 
Laboratory of the department of Foods and Feeding 
of the Hatch Experiment Station. 

Ex-97. — Louis M. Huntress, Physical Director to 
the Northampton Y. M. C. A. 

'98. — Willis S. Fisher, Principal in High School, 
Yorkville, Me. 

'98. — Alexander Montgomery, Assistant Superin- 
tendant, Waban Rose Conservatories, Natic. 



24 



AGGIE 1.IFE. 



'98.- — The Life is always glad to hear of births and 
after announcing so many marriages it is with the 
greatest of pleasure that we announce the birth of a 
son to Clifford Clark, Sunderland. 

'99. — M. H. Pingree has been appointed assistant 
chemist at the Pennsylvania Experiment Station Col- 
lege, Pennsylvania. 

Ex-99. — The engagement of A. A. Boutelle to 
Miss Anna Beaman of Leverett has been announced. 

Ex-99.— John R. Dutcher and H. C. Courtney 
have engaged in the Wholesale and Retail Flour 
business. They are also Commission Merchants in 
New York city. 

NINETEEN HUNDRED. 

E. K. Atkins has accepted a position with C. E 
Davis, Civil Engineer, at Northampton. 

F. Guy Stanley has entered Harvard Medical 
school, Boston. 

M. H. Munson is assistant cattle buyer for Swift 
& Co., Chicago. Address No. 309 East 56th St., 
Chicago, 111. 

Howard Baker, veterinary student at U. of P. 
Address No. 215 DeKalb Square, Philadelphia, Pa. 

J. E. Halligan is assistant chemist at the Hatch 
Experiment station. 

A. A. Harmon veterinary student at U. of P. 
Address No. 215 De Kalb Square, Philadelphia, Pa. 

J. F. Lewis was in town recently. 

Morton Campbell spent a few days in town recently. 

Ex-'93. — Lee Phillips has entered the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology, Boston. Address 
West Hanover, Mass. 



L. C. Glafin, Editor-in-Chief. 
R. W. Morse, Business Manager. 

the: "INDEX" 

(VOLUME XXXII) 
Published Annually by the Jurior Class. 
To the Public: — We wish to announce that the 
Year Book of the Class of 1902 is being compiled, 
and that time, thought, work and money are not 
being spared to make the XXXII Volume of the 
" Index " an accurate summary of the past college 



year, and the mouthpiece of college thought and senti- 
ment ; as well as an ornament and a credit to our 
college. 

To interest in the 1902 " Index" all who are inter- 
ested in " Old Aggie " is the hope of 

The 1902 " Index " Board. 



TO THE DEAF. 



A rich lady, cured of her Deafness and Noises in the Head 
by Dr. Nicholson's Artificial Ear Drums, gave $10,000 to his 
Institute, so that deaf people unable to procue the Ear Drums 
may have them free. Address No. 4951c The Nicholson 
Institute, 780 Eighth Avenue. New York. U. S. A. 



DRAWING AND BLUE PROCESS PAPERS, 

SCALES, ANGLkS, CURVES and T SQUARES, 

ARCHITECTS' AND DRAFTMEN'S COLORS, 

SCHOOL BOXES WATER COLORS, 



& 



INCORPORATED, 



82 and 8i Washington St., l-p^orp^-Kj 
216 and 218 Clarendon St., f J^^^iurs. 



Factories, MALDEN, MASS. 



SOLE AGENT FOR 

THE WORLD'S BEST. 




$3.50. 



OFTEN IMITATED.^ 
NEVER EQUALED* 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

FOOT BALL, BASE BALL, 
BICYCLE AND TENNIS SHOES. 




1 H^ JLw i K^ C^9 



VOL. XI. 



AMHERST. MASS., OCTOBER 24, 1900, 



NO. 3 



, Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, IVIass. Aggie Life will be sent 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

CLARENCE EVERETT GORDON, 1901, Editor-in-Chief. 
NATHAN DAVIS WHITMAN, 1901, Business Manager. 
LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, 1902, Assistant Business Manager. 

Assistant Editors. 



CHARLES LESLIE RICE, 1901. 
THOMAS CASEY, 1901. 
CHARLES MILTON KINNEY, 1902. 
CLIFFORD ALBION TINKER, 1903. 



JAMES HENRY CHICKERING, 1901. 

HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT, 1902. 
ARTHUR LINCOLN DACY, 1902. 
-NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN, 1903. 



Terms: $1.00 per year in adi^ance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside oi United States and Canada, 25c. eistra. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot-Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

G. R. Bridgeforth, Pres. Athletic Association, 
C. L. Rice, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

J. H. ChickeringSec. Nineteen Hundred and Two Index, 

Reading-Room, C. T. Leslie, Secretary. 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
C. L. Rice, Manager. 
R. W, Morse, Manager. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



Edi-toraals. 



There has lately been published by Hinds and 
Noble of New York a book entitled " Songs of all the 
Colleges." It includes representative songs from the 
different colleges over all the country as well as many 
new ones. The selections have been very carefully 
made and in some cases the old music has been re- 
tained but new words put to the measures. The book 
is destined to become very popular among both under- 
graduates and alumni, as it appeals to everyone's 
taste. It should be in the library of every student and 
cherished by him, for there is nothing in after life like 
college songs to bring back the old college days with 
their pleasant recollections. 



The game with Trinity on the 20th was a sad dis- 
appointment. Something was radically wrong. That 
the team should go to pieces so soon after the Wil- 
liams game was a surprise to everybody. Everything 



goes to prove that it is folly to think for a moment 
that anything but extreme carefulness and constant 
practice in signals and in team work can keep a team 
in shape for three games like those of the last week. 
The captain requires the support of every man not 
only on the gridiron but wherever else he may be. It 
is deeply disaippointing and almost inexcusable to 
meet with so disgraceful a defeat. Everybody 
into it for the coming games. Let the scrub get out 
and show the "varsity" how to play football. We can- 
not afford to lose so disgracefully again. 



The Life wishes to call the attention of the stu- 
dents to the M. A. C. cadet band. It does not wish 
to dwell on the past, it would fain have nothing to do 
with the present also, for the subject of this editorial 
is quite enough in evidence by reason of its own noise 
at just this time, but of the future it would like to say 
one word. The band is a reality, its members are 
enthusiastic, and recent trials have shown distinct 
progress and considerable improvement over the 



26 



AGGIE LIFE. 



crude attempts of a few days ago. This fact gives 
us all encouragement and fills us with hope that the 
band will amount to something, and at no far distant 
time will be a valuable addition to our battalion. 
Considerable expense has been incurred by the Col- 
lege, which has given very substantial encouragement 
■to the venture, and by the members of the band. 
The students should do what is in their power to help 
on the movement. 



Class scrimmages in connection with class con- 
tests can hardly be helped ; at least, while certain 
customs remain in vogue, and while college tradition 
is too conservative and powerful to dispense with these 
contests. This must be generally admitted, openly or 
otherwise. But experience teaches us that ex- 
tremes are pernicious and dangerous and are liable to 
lead to a sweeping abolishment of many good customs, 
a final resort of those who never concern themselves 
with what comes within the bounds of reason. The 
affair of a week ago was disgraceful ; neither time nor 
place was considered. It is to be hoped that good 
sense and moderation will prevail in the future ; and 
that the annual freshman and sophomore rope-pull 
may remove a college custom, and the victories and 
trophies to which it leads, a part of each man's mem.- 
ory of the good times he had in college. 



IN MEMORIAM 

JOHN DAVIS WILLIAMS FRENCH. 
John D. W. French was born in Boston, Jan. 29, 
1841. and died at Atlantic City, N. J., May 2, 1900. 
He fitted for college in Dixwell's school, and entered 
Harvard College from which he was graduated with 
the class of 1863. Shortly after leaving college he 
entered the service of the United States Christian 
Commission. He remained in this work during the 
years 1864 and 1865. In the spring of 1866 he 
sailed for Europe remaining there a little more than a 
year, and returning to America in October, 1867. In 
November, 1867, he bought a farm at North Andover, 
Mass., afterwards known as " Cochickewick Farm.'- 
Here he engaged in cattle raising and soon became 
noted for his fine herd of Ayrshire cattle which 
brought many prizes. He was also awarded a prize 
of $1000 by the Massachusetts Society for Promoting 
Agriculture for his famous larch plantation. 



Mr. French's term of public service was a long one 
and the positions of trust and honor which he filled 
were manifold. He served from 1882 to 1885 in the 
Boston Common Council and was chairman of the 
Council Committee on Common and Public Squares. 
From 1866 to 1882 he was secretary of the Ayrshire 
Breeders' association, and was president from 1882 
to 1883. He was a recognized authority on the Ayr- 
shire breed of cattle, and in addition to his work as 
editor of the Ayrshire Record (Herd Book) published 
a pamphlet on Ayrshire cattle. He was for many 
years president of the New England Milk Producers' 
Union, and did valuable work for the American For- 
estry association. He was president of the Episcopal 
club of Boston and an active member in the Episco- 
pal church. He was appointed a trustee of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College in 1890. At the 
annual meeting of the Board of Trustees, held June 1 , 
1900, the following resolutions were read : 

" In the death of John Davis Weld French this 
Board has lost a valued and respected member, a 
man whose excellent judgment and helpful and cheer- 
ful advice were often sought and thoroughly appreci- 
ated by those who knew him intimately. Although 
not born on a farm or educated at an agricultural insti- 
tution he was one of the best informed agriculturists 
of our State, and loved agriculture for agriculture's sake, 
as shown by his disinterested work in its behalf for 
nearly forty years. He was a cheery, bright and 
witty man, and withal modest and unassuming. He 
was earnest and sincere, conscientious and absolutely 
upright in his dealings with men ; slow to form friend- 
ships, but when his confidence was won he was a 
loyal and devoted friend. Abhorring deceit and sham, 
he admired frankness and honesty, which he typified. 
He was courageous and outspoken, helpful and benev- 
olent in quiet and unobstrusive ways. His services in 
connection with the many and varied agricultural in- 
terests of the State should be commended particularly 
by this Board, notably his work in behalf of pure milk 
for our cities, and the re-organization of the New 
England Milk Producers' Union, of which he was 
president for many years ; his efforts to purify and ele- 
vate the agricultural exhibitions of the country as en- 
couraged and carried on by the Bay State Agricultu- 
ral society, of which he was one of the leading 
founders and president for four years ; his work in 



AGGIE LIFE. 



27 



behalf of forestry, his cherished interest, and to which 
he gave Hberally of his time and money ; his devotion 
to horticulture as shown by his long and active connec- 
tion with the Massachusetts Horticultural society, and 
last but not least his honorable service for eight years 
on this Board and for this College, which next to his 
Alma Mater he cherished most dearly — all this and 
more deserves our recognition and should have its 
proper place in our annals. He was a large hearted, 
noble, Christian man, and a beautiful example to his 
fellowmen. His life was a splendid success." 



GEORGE H. ELLIS. 

George H. Ellis was born in Medfield, Mass., Oct. 
3, 1848. His childhood was spent upon the farm and 
here he learned to love the life which he afterwards 
took up of his own accord in addition to the active 
business which he has built up and carries on to-day 
in Boston, His early schooling was obtained in the 
public schools of Medfield. In 1865, he took a busi- 
ness course of study in a Boston comm.ercial 
college, and in December of the same year 
entered the office of the Christian Register as clerk. 
In 1868 he became its business manager and still 
retains a business connection with the paper. In 1873 
he began in a very simple way to do job printing, thus 
laying the foundation for what has become one of the 
largest general printing offices in Boston. He also 
carried on a considerable book and periodical business 
in addition to his job printing. In 1890 his interest 
in and love for farming led him to buy a small farm 
of only twenty-five acres almost in the geographical 
centre of the city of Newton. The farm is a part of 
and forms the basis of operations for " Wanwinet 
Farm " which comprises in land owned and leased 
more than twelve hundred acres, and in stock kept 
upon it more than three hundred and fifty head of 
thoroughbred and grade Jersey cattle. Mr. Ellis has 
been twice m.arried, and has two children, both by his 
first wife. He was appointed a trustee of the Mas- 
sachusetts Agricultural College in 1900. 



A kind of Employment Bureau, known as the 
Department of Self-Help, has recently been instituted 
at Yale. Its objects is to supply needy and worthy 
students of the University with work, by obtaining for 
them positions with the business men of the city. 



CADET BATTALION, M. A. C, ROSTERS. 

Field and Staff. 

William C. Dickerman, '01, Major. 

Clarence E. Gordon, '01, First Lieut, and Adjutant. 

John C. Barry, '01, First Lieut, and Quartermaster. 

Charles L. Rice, '01, Sergeant Major. 

Band. 

., ,j ..r i -00 ( First Serg't, Chief Musician. 

Myron H. West, 02>,)^^^^^^J ^^^^^^^ 

Private, cymbals. 

2d Alto. 
" E flat Bass. 

2d B flat cornet. 

1st B flat cornet. 

Solo Alto. 

B flat Bass. 
" 2d Tenor. 

Baritone. 

Solo B flat cornet. 



Handy, R. S.. '04, 
Haskell, S. E., '04, 
Kirby, D. W., '04, 
Parker, S. R., '04, 
Pease, J. A., '04, 
Peck, A. L., '04. 
Pierce, H. C, '04, 
Richardson, C, '04, 
Robertson, R. H.. '03, 
Smith, S. L., '02, 



Tottingham, W. E., '03, " 1st Tenor. 

Webster, F. W., '03, " Snare Drum. 

V/est, D. N., '02, " Piccolo. 

Witherell, G. A., '04, " Bass Drum. 

Company "A." 
N. D. Whitman, '01, Captain. 
E. S. Gamwell, '01, First Lieutenant. 
T. Graves, Jr., '01, Second 
J. H. Chickering, '01, First Sergeant. 
H. A. Paul, '02, Second 
W. A. Dawson, '01, Third 
P. C. Brooks, '01, Fourth 
R. W. Morse, 02. Fifth 
W. Z. Chase, '02, First Corporal. 

G. R. Bridgeforth, '01, Second " 
C. A. Tinker, '03, Third 
W. R. Pierson, '01, Fourth 
Allen, W. E., '03, Private. 

Baker, R., '04, 
Barnes, H. L., '04, 
Belden, J. H., '02, 
Bowen, H. C, '03, 
Cheever, H. M., '03, 
Claflin, L. C, '02, 
Cook, L. A., '02, 
Dellea. J. M., '02, 
Franklin, H. J., '03, 



2d 



AGGIE LIFE, 



Gregg, J. W., '04, 


Cook, J. G., '03, 


Graves, G. A., '04, 


Collins, '04, 


Halligan, C, P., '03, 


Cooley, 0. F., '02, 


Harris, F. A., '03. 


Copeland, W. W., '04, 


Henshaw, F. F., '04, 


Couden, F. D., '04, 


Higgins, W. E., '03, 


Cunnmings, J. F., '04, 


Hill, L. W., '04, 


Elwood, '04, " 


Hood, W. L., '03, 


Esip, E., '04, 


Kinney, C. M., '02, 


Fahey, J. J., '04, 


Lewis, C. W.. '04, 


Gates, V. A., '02, 


Monahan, N. F., '03, 


Gay. R. P., '04, 


Nersessian, P. N., '03, 


Griffin, C. H., '04, 


Paul. A. R., '04. 


Haffenreffer, A. F., '04, " 


Peebles, W. W., '03, 


Hodgkiss, H. E., '02, 


Poole, E. M., '03, 


Jones, G. D., '03, 


Raymoth, R. R., '04, 


Kellihir, J., '04, 


Root, L. A., '01, 


Knight, H. L., '02, 


Ryan, A., '04. 


Lewis, C. I., '02, 


Snell, E. B.. '03, 


Martin, H. T., '03. ' 


Staples, P. F., '04, 


Newton, H. D., '04, 


Tashjian. D. B., '01, 


Ovalle, J. M., '01, 


Thompson, 0. L.. '04, 


Parsons, A., '03. 


Tottingham, W. E.. '04, 


Proulx, E. G., '03, 


Tower, W. V., '03, 


Quigley, R. A., '04, 


Witt, H. B., '03, 


Richardson, H. L., '03, 


Company " B ". 


Saunders, E. B., '02, 
Sawin R., '04, 


A. C. Wilson, '01, Captain. 


White, H. M., '04, 


E. L. Macomber, '01, First Lieutenant. 





Thomas Casey, '01, Second 

C. T. Leslie, '01, First Sergeant. 

R. L Smith, '01, Second 

J. H. Todd, '01, Third 

J. B. Henry, '01, Fourth Sergeant. 

A. L. Dacy, '02, Fifth Sergeant. 

E. F. McCobb, '02, First Corporal. 

C. E. Dwyer, '02, Second 

J. C. Hall, '02, Third " 

T. F. Cooke, '01, Fourth 

Bach, E. A., '04, . Private. 

Bacon, S. C, '03, 

Barrus, G. L., '03, 

Blake, E. E., '03, 

Bodfish, H. L., '02, 

Bowler, P. H., '03, 

Brooks, P. W., '03, 

Church, F. R., '02, 



A TRIP TO LEVERETT. 

About ten members of the Natural History Club 
took advantage of the fine weather on Wednesday 
afternoon by taking a long tramp to Leverett. The 
afternoon was almost perfect, and the walk proved a 
very enjoyable one. The objective point was the 
galena mine near Leverett station. The men studied 
the rock formation about the abandoned mine, and 
collected specimens of feldspar, showing typical cleav- 
age, quartz, and some galena, which seemed to be a 
rather scarce article. Professor Howard accompa- 
nied the party, pointing out many things of interest. 
A trip will be made In the near future to the asbestos 
mine in Pelham. An interesting time is promised 
and more of the fellows are urged to join the party. 
Notice of date and arrangements will be duly an 
nounced on the bulletin board. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



29 



/^thletSc fJo-tfi- 



Wesleyan, 1 7 ; Aggie, 0. 

On Saturday Oct. 13, Aggie sent a crippled team 
to Middletown and was defeated by the above score. 
Considering the condition of the team the score is 
very gratifying, showing the men strong in both defen- 
sive and offensive play. Lewis was unable to go into 
this game on account of injuries, so Bodfish was put 
at full and Kellehir and Dellea shared the honors at 
one end,whlle MacCobb held down the other. At the 
best the combination was weak and uncertain. 

Wesleyan kicked off to Aggie in the first half the 
ball being downed on the twenty-five yard line. By a 
series of fierce line rushes and runs just outside tackle 
the ball was carried to Wesleyan's fifteen- yard line 
where the ball was held for downs. Wesleyan then 
worked the ball back up the field playing the ends and 
rushing the ball outside the tackles but never gaining 
through our line. After a little more than nineteen 
minutes of play, Montgomery was sent across the line 
for a touchdown. 

In the second half Wesleyan held the ball the 
greater part of the time. Aggie's attack seemed to 
weaken and the line was unable to withstand the 
rushes of the Wesleyan backs. In this half the great- 
est weakness of the team was exposed, that in our 
kicking department. Barry tried the kicks at first but 
succeeded in getting them off too late or else kicked 
straight into the air. Later Snell was tied with but 
poor success. Inglis for Wesleyan did some fine kick- 
ing getting the ball off well and covering a great deal 
of distance. 

The scoring in the second half was done by Inglis 
and Lacey, no goal being kicked from the first touch- 
down. Through the game the strong work of Inglis, 
C. Dodds and T. F. Cooke were the features. 

The line up : 

WESLEYAN. AGGIE. 

S. A. Dodds, 1. e. r. e., Dellea 

Yarrow, 1. t. r. t., Cooke 

Pike, 1. g. r. g.. Gam well 

Randall, Day, c. c Paul 

Stillman, r. g. 1. f., Snell 

Montgonaery, Thompson, r, t. 1. t., Halligan 



Garrison, r. 9. 

C. R. Dodds, q, b, 

Lacey, 1. h. b. 

Gaidar, McGonnell, r. h. b. 

Inglis, f. b. 



1. e., McCobb 

q. b.. Whitman 

r. h. b., Barry 

J. h. b,, Chickering 

f. b., Bodfish 



Score — Wesleyan 17, Aggie 0. Touchdowns — Montgom- 
ery, Inglis, Lacey. Goals from touchdowns — Yarrow 2, 
Referee — R. E. Davis of Middletown. Umpire — Steele of 
Hartford. Linesmen — Cornwall of Wesleyan and Kelliher 
of Amherst. Time — 20 and 15 minute halves. 

Williams, 5 ; Aggie, 0. 

On Wednesday, Oct. 17, Aggie held Williams to a 
single touchdown on Weston Field. It was a glorious 
day for football and our team played a strong and 
snappy game, always gaining when holding the ball 
and contesting every inch hotly when not in possession 
of the pigskin. Straight football marked our play 
while Williams resorted to tricks. 

Cooke lost the toss and kicked off to Williams. 
The ball was advanced a few yards and then downed. 
Williams gained a few yards by rushes on the tackles 
and then lost the ball on downs. Aggie then rushed 
the ball into Williams' territory to lose it on downs 
also. The Williams team then tried a quarter-back 
run, and succeeded in getting around MacCobb for 
twenty-five yards. They got around him again on a 
straight end run which brought them to Aggie's 
twenty-yard line. Short gains brought the ball to our 
ten-yard line where Williams fouled and lost the ball. 
Aggie tried plays but was forced to kick. Williams 
by repeated rushes on our tackles sending the plays 
just outside, succeeded in pushing Graves over for a 
touchdown after 19 minutes and 40 seconds of play. 

In the second half Williams kicked off and. Aggie 
at once showed her offensive strength, rushing the ball 
to Willams ten yard line. Here Williams' 
official saw a foul and took the ball, thus 
destroying our chances of winning. Williams was un- 
able to gain and was forced to punt, several kicks be- 
ing exchanged and Cooke always coming out best on 
distance. Williams worked another trick in this half 
winning her about forty yards. The game ended with 
the ball in Williams' possession on our thirty yard 
line. 

The game was a very pretty one to watch, the balj 
changing hands continually and both sides being liable to 
score at any time. The features were the work of the 
four tackles Cooke and Halligan, Summons and 
Hatch. 



WILLIAMS. 

O'Neil, 1. e. 
Simmons. 1. t. 
Davenport, 1. g. 



AGGIE. 

r. e., Bodfish 

r. t.. Cook 

r. g., Gamwell 



30 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Kanter, c. 

Huggins. r. g. 

Hatch, r. t. 

Rooney, r. e. 

Leggett, q. b. 

Graves, 1. h. b. 

Jacckel, Lawrence, r. h. b. 

Dloph, Peabody, f. b. 



c, Paul 

1. g., Snell 

1. t,. Halligan 

1. e., McCobb 

q. b.. Whitman 

r. h. b., Barry 

1. h. b., Chickering 

f. b.', Lewis 



Score — Williams 5. Touchdown — Graves. Umpire — 
Draper, Williams. Referee — Rice, Amherst. Time — 20 and 
15 minute halves. 

Trinity, 23 ; Aggie, 0. 

On Saturday, October 20, our team met the aggre- 
gation representing Trinity College at Hartford. The 
listless work of our boys combined with an utter disre- 
gard of the Trinity men for the rules of the game as 
well as an umpire who refused to see the most open 
and dirty fouls account for the score. 

The line-up: 

TRINITY. AGGIE. 

Broden, 1. e. r. e., Bodfish 

VanTyne, 1. t. r. t., Cooke 

Hill, 1. g. ' r. g., Gamwell 

M. Johnson, c. c, Paul 

W. Johnson, r. g. 1. g., Pierson, Bridgforth 

Henderson, r. t. 1. t., HaUigan 

Maddex, r. e. 1. e., McCobb 

Wheeler, q. b. q. b.. Whitman 

Brearley, 1. h. b. r. h. b., Barry 

Bellamy, r. h. b. 1. h. q., Chickering 

Townsend, f. b. f. b., Lewis 
Score — Trinity 23, Aggie 0. Referee — Halligan, Amherst. 

Umpire — Ellis, Trinity. Linesmen — Leslie and Barnes. 

Time — 20 and 15 minutes halves. 



THE ANNUAL ROPE-PULL. 

The rope-pull which took place on the campus Fri- 
day afternoon, October 19th, resulted in a victory for 
the Sophomores. When the rope was brought upon 
the field it was found to be a quarter of an inch too 
small in diameter, but Captain Barrus of the Sopho- 
more team consented to pull with it. 

The Sophomores gained a foot on the drop and 
without waiting to gain good foot-holds started to 
heave. At first neither side gained but the better 
team work of the Sophomores soon began to tell. 
The Sophomores could boast eleven feet of Freshman 
rope their side the stake when time was called. The 
Sophomore team was handicapped by the absence of 
Snell, Its anchor, who was unable to pull. After the 
pull the winning side celebrated in true autumn coun- 



try fashion. The teams were made up as follows : 
Sophomore, G. L. Barrus, capt. ; H. C. Bowen, P. H. 
Bowler, C. P. Halligan, W. E. Allen, H. J. Franklin, 
anchor. Freshman, C. W. Lewis, captain ; P. P. 
Gay, D. W. Kirby, H. H. Witt, J. A. Pease, H. C. 
Pierce, anchor. 



— Frost and chestnuts. 

— The Belchertown fair has " happened " and 
none are reported missing. 

— E. F. McCobb, 1902, slightly injured his knee 
in the game with Williams. 

• — Messrs. Claflin and Morse, 1902, spent last 
week in Boston on business. 

— It appears that v/e are to have fire-drill shortly. 
This will be new to most of us and — variety is the 
spice of drill. 

— The first gathering of Mr. Petit's dancing class 
for students will be held in Grange Hall to-night, 24th 
inst, at 7-30 o'clock. 

— President Goodell and Prof. W. P. Brooks will 
represent the college at the inauguration of President 
Prickett at M. I. T. to-day. 

— Alden H. Clark, secretary of the Amherst col- 
lege Y. M. C. A. gave an interesting talk before our 
Y. M. C. A. Sunday afternoon. 

— Word has been received that two Greek boys are 
coming from Robert's college, Constantinople, Turkey 
to enter the Mass. Agricultural College. 

— Snell, 1903, had the misfortune to sprain his 
ankle in the Williams' game. He is able to be 
about, having had it put in a plaster cast. 

— The Natural History Society has arranged to 
take several tramps about the country. A number of 
the fellows went to Leverett Wednesday. 

— Target practice is now carried on in a systematic 
way, both the one and the two hundred yard ranges 
being used. Major Dickerman is in charge. 

— The juniors are now delivering their first orations. 
Oratorical training is a very important part of a thor- 
ough college education and the fact that we have no 
organized debating society makes it much more so in 
our case. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



31 



—The senior class in surveying is engaged in mak- 
ing plans for a railroad about the College grounds. 
For shares of stock apply to anyone in the above 
department. 

—The following have become members of the 
Country club : Allen, Griffin, Thompson, Haffenraffer 
and Couden. Golfing at the Amherst links is becom- 
ing very popular. 

— Lewis, 1904, cut his foot so badly that he could 
not play in the Wesleyan game, but he recovered in 
season for the Williams' game and is now prac- 
ticing every day. 

— The Year Book of the Department of Agriculture 
for the year 1899 contains a long and exhaustive ar- 
ticle on agricultural education in the United States 
by Prof. Herman Babson of this College. 

— A large delegation of students attended the ad- 
dress of Senator Hoar at Northampton Thursday 
night. This was an exceptional opportunity to hear 
so distinguished a man, and many of our local politi- 
cians took advantage of it. 

— It happens that most of the band musicians room 
in east entry of North College. For a time that por- 
tion of the dormitory was a musical bedlam, but this 
has been stopped by a military bulletin, much to the 
relief of everybody in general. 

— The Natural History Society has elected the 
following-named officers ; President, C. Gordon ;vice- 
president, C. E. Dwyer ; secretary and treasurer, T. 
F. Cooke ; executive committee, A. C. Wilson, A. C. 
Monahan, J. B. Knight, C. Carpenter. 

— The students have organized a Republican club 
by electing the following-named officers : Presi- 
dent, T. F. Cooke; vice-president, N. D.Whitman; 
secretary and treasurer, T. Casey ; executive com- 
mittee, T. F. Cooke, N. D. Whitman, T. Casey, W. 
A. Dawson, C. L. Rice. 

— Dr. Walker addressed the members of the 
Republican Club on " Imperialism and a Silver Cur- 
rency," in the chapel Monday evening. He contrasted 
the Imperialism of the Roman Empire, the British 
Empire, and that of Spain with that of the United 
States and endeavored to show that the present policy 
of the United States would make her the dominating 
Influence for good in the East, and would place her in 



command of the great Pacific Ocean, the control of 
which must soon mean the domination of the World, 
He had no faith in a currency without gold, and stated 
that his convictions should lead him to vote for Mr. 
McKinley and the Republican party. 



THE EVOLUTION OF THE INDEX. 

The pioneer classes of a college determine to no 
slight degree its subsequent history. Upon them 
devolves the responsibility of establishing the traditions 
which succeeding classes must follow. Nowhere is 
the law of precedent so strong as at college ; "what 
has been, must be." 

It is to be regretted that the traditions of this college 
are not more numerous. A healthy college spirit 
needs the historic customs of the past behind it in 
order that it may be lasting. But we may at least 
rejoice that those customs which have been established 
have been for the most part faithfully followed. 

The publication of the Index is an example ; begun 
by the first class that entered the College, and it has 
been continued every year. Hardly a class but has 
found the book a burden. Many classes have been 
in doubt as to the wisdom of issuing it. Often it has 
seemed to the smaller classes well nigh impossible, 
yet it has always been done. The class of '84 num- 
bered but five men, not enough to make up a com- 
plete board of editors. How they managed is a 
mystery ; we notice that with a certain grim humor 
they dedicated the book to "their sorrowing creditors," 
but at any rate the Index came out. The class of '98 
with only ten men and with precedent requiring a 
much more elaborate volume than that of the early 
days had a tremendons struggle but the Index came 
out for all that. The class of 71 had no alumni to 
depend on, only two other classes were in college, the 
Faculty was small, the College itself comparatively 
unknown and friendless. Yet in spite of these 
unfavorable conditions the Index was begun and as has 
been stated, never was permitted to lapse. 

It must not be supposed, however, that the Index of 
1869 was in many respects identical with the 
Index as published in the last few years. 
On the contrary, the annual has been 
enlarged and improved in a degree proportional to 
the growth and the development of the College. The 



32 



AGGIE LIFE. 



'7 1 Index is hardly to be considered with the preten- 
tious and elaborate volume of '01 . Yet the contrast 
is probably no more striking than would be a com- 
parison of the buildings or of the courses of study of 
the two periods. The College has grown and the 
Index with it. 

The first Index was a pamphlet of twenty-eight 
pages, each not more than half as large as those used 
to-day. It was bound in a yellow paper cover, and it 
must be admitted looked more like a dime novel than 
a modern college annual. No board of editors is 
given, and nothing said as to the existence of athletic 
teams or other college organizations. There is simply 
an introductory article, the class histories, the class 
statistics and the list of members of the two frater- 
nities then in existence. In the introduction, wherein 
the reasons for the publishing of the book are set forth 
occurs this noteworthy statement : "The reader of 
the Faculty catalogue would have almost no concep- 
tion of the throbbing, active life beneath that cold 
formal exterior; to show the College from the students' 
standpoint as a living active body is our purpose." It 
will be admitted by all that succeeding Index boards 
have always remained faithful to this high ideal. 

Volume II was of a similar nature, but the number 
of pages was increased to 42. Boating and baseball 
statistics appear for the first time as do also a few 
"roasts" for which the book in later years became 
noted. 

Volume III contained 48 pages, aside from the 
histories entirely devoid of literary matter. The 
most glorious athletic achievement of the College, 
the defeating of the crews of Harvard and Brown at 
Ingleside in record-breaking time receives bare men- 
tion, which indicates that the victory was taken quite 
as a matter of course. 

Volume V contained 64 pages, which was the limit 
for several years. It is noteworty as the first issue to 
be illustrated. Advertisements were not used until 
a year later and alumni statistics were not collected 
till 1877. The calendar of happenings was added in 
1879. The mechanical appearance of the book 
was constantly improving. The illustrations, which 
in the earlier volumes can be compared only to 
Egyptian hieroglyphics, soon became much more 
artistic. Photogravures were added in the early '80's 
and have ever since been one of the most attractive 



features of the book. A good substantial cover took 
the place of the flimsy paper affair in 1890, and now 
the covers receive much of the artist's attention. The 
size of the pages was nearly doubled about this time, 
and again enlarged last year. The number of pages 
is now about 200. An edition de luxe was gotten out 
for the first time last year. It is an open question, 
however, whether under present conditions this last 
is not an unnecessary extravagance. 

Literary development came slowly. English and 
English composition were taught but meagerly in the 
early days, there was no College paper, and there was 
but little to draw out the students' latent abilities. 
Verse of more or less excellence appears scattered 
through the pages, but only in recent years has it been 
at all conspicuous. The first prose work was an 
article each year from some prominent alumnus. 
This feature was retained till quite recently. Later, 
descriptions of prominent events, occasional stories 
and miscellaneous articles are to be found. Classes 
in recent years have sought particularly for special 
features in which to excell their predecessors, and today 
the book compares very favorable with the average of 
the annuals of the leading colleges of the country. 

How much further improvement can be made is a 
question. Unfortunately, but necessarily, the im- 
provements of the past have enormously increased 
the cost of production. A limit must soon be 
reached. The price at which the book is always sold 
does not now pay half the cost of printing alone. 
Advertisements help to quite an extent, yet the busi- 
ness manager ought not to be obliged to devote so 
much time to securing them. The one feature of 
the Index which in all these years has not improved is 
its sales. It is true that the College is no larger now 
than it was thirty years ago, and the proportion of 
students purchasing the book is probably as high as 
ever. But there is this difference between the two 
periods. In 1879 there were no alumni whatever; 
in 1900 there are over six hundred. In other insti- 
tutions the college annual is supported by the alumni 
almost to a man. Last year our six hundred alumni 
are reported to have purchased collectively and indi- 
vidually the magnificent total of thirty copies. Thirty 
copies ! that means thirty dollars as the amount of 
financial support our alumni have given us. The 
alumni list alone, published by the Index for the ben- 



AGGIE LIFE, 



33 



efit of alumni, and which list be it remembered is 
never published in the annuals of the colleges about 
us, cost the board over fifty dollars. It costs every 
member of the junior class a minimum of ten dollars 
to issue the Index; our worthy alumni, men with 
good positions and liberal salaries consider they have 
done all that could be expected when they contribute 
five cents apiece. And to cap the climax some of 
them object because the Index is not better. 

This then is the situation. The Index, like our athletic 
department has been brought to a high standard,but only 
by becoming too heavy a burden on the student body. 
It is very doubtful whether under present conditions 
either can be materially improved. The one way to 
better these conditions lies in the adequate support 
of the College by the Alumni. When this is given, it 
will not be too much to hope that the Index, the ath- 
letic teams, and all the student organizations will at- 
tain a standing even more gratifying than any achieve- 
ments of the past. 



Oct. 19, 1900. 
To Pres. H. H. Goodell, 

My Dear Sir : — I wish to extend my hearty 
congratulations to the foot-ball eleven and substitutes, 
for the splendid showing which they have made thus 
far against strong college teams. It proves conclu- 
sively that our boys at the Agricultural College are 
made of the right stuff. May the good work go on. 
Yours very truly, 

H. E. Crane, '92. 



Iri-tercolle^^iat^. 



Courses in Japanese and Chinese are now offered 
at the University of California. 

Owing to a recent decision of Wesleyan's Faculty, 
all tutoring must now be done by official tutors. 

A course in Marine Engineering leading to the degree 
of M. S. has been established at the University of 
Michigan. 

Scholarships at the University of Chicago have 
recently been awarded to ten Porto Ricans, who desire 
to complete their education in the United States. 

It has been definitely decided that the next Olym- 
pian games will be held in this country at the Pan- 
American Exposition at Buffalo, N. Y. in 1901. 



Church attendance is to be no longer compulsory at 
Bowdoin, but a record of attendance will be kept and 
sent out to the students' parents at the close of each 
term. 

The Medical, Dental and Veterinary College of 
Harvard University will soon be moved to Brookline, 
where commodious grounds of about twenty-five acres 
have been purchased. 

A gymnasium of white marble, with a specially con- 
structed movable roof which provides for open air 
exercise, is the latest addition to the University of 
California. The cost is said to be over $2,000,000. 

An intercollegiate basket ball association is being 
formed, Harvard, Brown, Yale, Williams, Wesleyan 
and Dartmouth has signified their intentions of becom- 
ing members. Other colleges will be admitted on 
application. Games will be played this winter for the 
intercollegiate championship, 

A time-honored contest between the lower classmen 
at Wesleyan is what is known as the " cannon scrap." 
Tradition decrees that the Freshmen shall attempt to 
fire a certain cannon on the campus between twelve 
and one o'clock of the night preceding Washington's 
Birthday. To do this, the Freshmen remove the can- 
non some time previous, and hide it from the Sopho- 
mores. When the appointed hour comes, it is brought 
back to the campus and there if the Freshmen are 
sufficiently numerous loaded and fired. A committee 
of upper classmen act as judges and have strict super- 
vision over the whole struggle. 

^ 

LIBRARY NOTES. 

" The Last Sentence " by Maxwell Gray is the title 
of an interesting book which has lately been added. 
The author's name will testify as to the value of the 
book, no words from us are necessary. 

"Familiar Fish," their habits and capture by 
Eugene McCarthy. Angling is a recreation in which 
all should indulge, often times it affords a rest from 
study or business and the excitement of the sport fills 
you with new life. The author admits that it is very 
difficult to teach angling from a book, one must learn 
by experience. The author was an experienced 
fisherman and has given us the results of his experi- 
ments and observations in this book. He first gives 
us an idea of how fish are hatched and propagated 
and then a complete description of each family 



34 



AGGIE LIFE. 



with a few words in regard to each member. Fishing 
tackle is discussed and illustrations of each fish given. 
The book is written in a clear, simple manner, every 
idea and thought can be easily understood. 

" Women of the Valois Court " by Imbert de Saint- 
Amand. This is a life history of Marguerite, sister of 
Francis I and Catherine de Medici and her contem- 
poraries at the French court. It was written original- 
ly in French and has been translated by Elizabeth 
Gilbert Martin. These two women have played an 
important part In French history. They directed pub- 
lic affairs, made and broke treaties and shared in the 
Civil War. The book is an excellent translation, 
facts and dates are strictly adhered to, and the whole 
written in excellent form. 

"One Thousand American Fungi" by Charles Mc- 
Ilvaine. It gives full botanic descriptions of toad- 
stools, mush-rooms, fungi edible and poisonous ; how 
to select and cook the edible and how to distinguish 
and avoid the poisonous. The author became inter- 
ested in the subject from having read a short account 
of " Toadstool Eating " in the Popular Science Month- 
ly, which lead to his beginning a study for himself. 
To make his research as complete and correct as 
possible he has tested every variety himself and says 
there is no general rule by \vhich you can distinguish 
the poisonous from the edible varieties. The subject 
is treated in an exhaustive manner and everything 
fully illustrated. It is not designed for reading, but 
more for reference. The book is large and rather 
clumsy. It would be much more easily handled if it 
were divided into two volumes. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COL- 
LEGE CLUB OF NEW YORK. 

Presidents. 
1886, Samuel Clarence Thompson, 72, acting, 1886 
1886, Col. Asa Williams Dickinson, 74,acting, 1886 

1886, Joseph Franklin Barrett, 75, 1887 

1887, Samuel Clarence Thompson, 72, 1888 

1888, John Ashburton Cutter, M. D., '82, 1889 

1889, Sandford Dwight Foot, 78, 1890 

1890, Col. Asa Williams Dickinson, 74, 1892 

1892, Edgar Howard Libby, 74, 1893 

1893, Charles Elisha Young, M.D.,'81, acting, 1893 
1893, William Perkins Birnie, 71, 1894 



894, 
895, 
896, 
897, 
898, 
899, 

886, 



890, 
891, 
893, 
894, 
895 
896, 
897, 
898, 
899, 



890, 
891, 
892, 
893, 
894, 
895, 
896, 
897, 
898, 
899, 

895, 
896, 
897, 
898, 
899, 



893, 



889, 
890, 



James Henry Webb, LL. B., 73,' 

Joseph Edward Root, M. D., 76, 

Herbert Myrick, '82, 

Charles Elisha Young, M. D., '81, 

Charles Edward Beach, '82, 

John Ashburton Cutter. M. D., '82. 

Vice-Presidents. 
Henry Francis Hubbard, '78, 
Samuel Clarence Thompson, '72, 
Frank Gordon Urner, '77, 
Edgar Howard Libby, '74, 
Charles Elisha Young, M. D., '81, 
Alfred Armand Hevia, '83, 
John Clarence Cutter, M. D., '72, 
Herbert Myrick, '82, 
Frederick William Morris, '72, 
Burton Arial Kinney, '82, 
John Mitchell Benedict, '74, 
William Delano Russell, '71. 

Second Vice-Presidents. 
Col. Asa Williams Dickinson, 74, 
Charles Elisha Young, M. D., '81, 
William Perkins Birnie, '71, 
Henry Francis Hubbard, '78, 
Hezekiah Howell, '85, 
Charles Augustus Goodrich, M. D., '93, 
Charles Edward Beach, '82, 
Alfred Armand Hevia, '83, 
Winfield Ayres, M. D., '86, 
John Bacon Minor. '73, 
Samuel Clarence Thompson, '72. 

Third Vice-Presidents. 
Sandford Dwight Foot, '78, 
Louis Edward Goessmann, '94, 
Frederick Henry Read, '96, 
Edward Briggs Rawson, '81, 
Julian Stiles Eaton, '98. 

Secretary- Treasurers. 

John Ashburton Cutter, M. D., '82, 
Alfred William Lublin, '84, 
Alvan Luther Fowler, '80. 

Choragi. 
Sandford Dwight Foot, '78, 
Joseph Edward Root, M. D., '76, 
John Ashburton Cutter, M. D., '82, 



1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 



1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 



1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 



1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 



1893 



1889 
1890 
1892 



AGGIE LIFE. 



35 



1892, Frank Gordon Urner, 77, 1893 

1893, Harry Kirke Chase, '82, 1895 

1895, Prof. Chas. Loami Harrington, M. A., (Am- 

herst, 70) 1896 

1896, Sandford Dwight Foot, 78, 1897 

1897, Harry Kirke Chase, '82, 1898 

1898, Sandford Dwight Foot, '78. 

Historian. 
1895, John Ashburton Cutter, M. D., '82. 

THE MEMBERS OF THE CLUB. 

FROM THE FACULTY.* 

PRESIDENT HENRY H. GOODELL, M. A., LL. 
D., Annherst, Mass. 

EX-PRESIDENT LEVI STOCKBRIDGE, Am- 
herst, Mass. 

Henry E. Alvord, Capt. 10th Cav. U. S. A.; Dep't of 
Agric. Washington, D. C. 

Herman Babson, M. A., -Assistant Professor of Eng- 
lish, Amherst, Mass. 

Charles A. Goessmann, Ph. D., LL. D., Professor of 
Chemistry, Amherst, Mass. 

Charles L. Harrington, B. A., 38 West 59th St., New 
York. 

Abner H. Merrill, Major 3rd Artillery, U. S. A. 

George F. Mills, M. A., Professor of English and 
Latin, Amherst, Mass. 

Charles Morris, Maj. 7th Artillery, U. S. A. 

Henry W. Parker. M. A., D. D.. Care Popular 
Science News, 108 Fulton St., N. Y. 

Charles A. L. Totten, M. A., 1st Lieut. 4th Artillery, 
U. S. A., resigned, Milford, Conn. 

A. Courtenay Washburne, Actuarial Dep't Metropoli- 
tan Life Ins. Co., 1 Madison Avenue, New York. 

OTHER GUESTS OF THE CLUB.t 

William H. Brewer, M. A., Ph. D., (Yale '52) Profes- 
sor of Agriculture, Yale University, New Haven, 
Conn. 

Ephraim Cutter, M. D., LL. D., (Yale, '52) 120 
Broadway, New York. 

Dr. F. M. Hexamer, New York City. 

Wm. Ives Washburn, Esq., M. A., (Amherst, '76) 
Judge Advocate 5th Brigade, N. G. N. Y., 71 
Broadway, New York. 

*Other members of the Faculty have been present as guests of the Club 

but are classed with the following alumni list. 
tBut not members. 



FROM THE ALUMNI. 

Class of 1 87 1 . 

Andrew L. Bassett. Pier 36, East River, New York 
City. 

William P. Birnie, Springfield, Mass. 

William H. Bowker, M. A. C. Trustee, 43 Chatham 
St., Boston, Mass. 

Robert W. Lyman, LL. B., M. A. C. Lecturer, 
Northampton, Mass. 

William D. Russell, International Paper Co., 30 
Broad Street, New York. 

George C. Woolson, Passaic, N. J. 
Class of 1872. 

William E. Bullard, B. A., M. D., 1 13 East 40th St., 
New York City. 

Daniel P. Cole, Springfield, Mass. 

John C. Cutter, M. D., 7 Gates St., Worcester, Mass. 

Charles O. Flagg, Director Agr'l Experiment Station, 
Kingston, R. I. 

Samuel T. Maynard, Professor of Horticulture, Am- 
herst, Mass. 

Frederick W. Morris, 114 Fifth Ave., New York City. 

Frederick M. Somers, d'ed Feb. 2 1894. 

Samuel C. Thompson, Mem. Am. Soc. C. E., 950 
East 166 St., New York City. 
Class of 1873. 

John B. Minor, 127 Arch St., New Britain, Conn. 

James H. Webb, LL. B., Church & Crown Sts., In- 
structor Criminal Law & Medico- Legal Juris- 
prudence Yale, New Haven, Conn. 

Charles Wellington, Ph. D., Associate Professor of 
Chemistry, Amherst, Mass. 
Class of 1874. 

Frank E. Adams, 18 Powell St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

John M. Benedict, M. D., 18 Main St., Waterbury, 
Conn. 

Asa W. Dickinson, died Jan. 8, 1899. 

Edgar H. Libby, Lewiston, Idaho. 

William Lyman, died Dec. 20, 1896. 

Frank A. Towne, died March 1 1, 1896. 
Class of 1875. 

Joseph F. Barrett, 68 Broad St., New York City. 

John A. Barri, 294 Washington Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 

William P. Brooks, Prof, of Agric, Amherst, Mass. 

Henry S. Jackson, East Orange, N. J. 

John F. Winchester, D, V. S., Lawrence, Mass. 



36 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Class ot 1876. 
Charles H. Phelps, 23 Park Row, New York City. 
Joseph E. Root, M. D., 49 Pearl St., Hartford, Conn. 

Class of 1877. 
Walter M. Dickinson, Capt. U. S. A.,diedjuly 2. 1898 

from injuries received at El Caney. 
Henry F. Parker, LL. B., died Dec. 21, 1897. 
Charles H. Southworth, South Hadley Falls, Mass. 
Frank G. Urner, 173 Chambers St., Nev/ York City. 

Class of 1878. 
Sandford D. Foot, Patterson, N. J. 
Henry G. K. Heath, Ph. B., LL. B., 54 Wall St., 

New York City. 
Henry F. Hubbard, 94 Front St., New York City. 
Charles 0. Lovell, 591 Broadway, New York City. 
Charles E. Lyman, Middlefield, Conn. 
Frederick Tuckerman, M. D., Ph. D., Amherst, Mass. 
John H. Washburn, Ph. D., President R. I., Agr'l & 

Mech. Coll., Kingston, R. I. 

Concluded in next issue. 



The fifteenth annual banquet of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College Club of New York will take place 
at Hotel St. Denis, Broadway and 4th Sts., Friday 
evening, Dec. 7th, at 6-30 o'clock. 

"71. — Wm. D. Russell is auditor for International 
Paper Co. Address, No. 30 Broad- St., New York 
City. 

'80. — William C. Parker is a candidate for alder- 
man, wards 10 — 19, Boston, Mass. Address 340 
Tremont Bldg., Boston. 

Ex-'87. — Frederick Deming Tucker has been ap- 
pointed principal of the Minnesota School of Agricul- 
ture. 

'90. — F. W. Mossman of the Department of Foods 
and Feeding, Hatch Experiment Station, is collecting 
samples of fodders throughout the state. 

'94. — A. J. Marse is taking a course in law at 
Boston University Law School. Address, 202 North- 
ampton St., Boston, Mass. 

'94.— In Spencer, Mass., Sept. 11, a daughter to 
Mr, and Mrs. Linus H. Bacon. 

'96. — Frank L. Clapp's address is No. 3 Mt. Vernon 
St., Boston, instead of No. 15 as published in our last 
issue. 



'98. — A. G. Adjemian has returned to Turkey. 
Address, care of Rev. Herman Barnum, Karpoot, 
Turkey. 

'99. — W. A. Hooker has resigned his position with 
Meekins, Packard & Wheat of Springfield, and is now 
taking a course of study and training for nurses at the 
Worcester City hospital, Worcester, Mass. 

'00. — James F. Lewis is private secretary for 
Representative William C. Parker. Address 340 
Tremont Bldg., Boston, Mass. 

'00.— E. T. Hull's address is 258 West 54th St., 
New York. 

'00. — A. F. Frost is with the Boston Bridge Works, 
at 70 Kilby St. Address, Room 16, Greenwich 
Park, Boston, Mass. 



L. C. Claflin, Editor-jn-Chief. 
R. W. Morse, Business Manager. 

^°" S « i 



(VOLUME XXXII) 
Published Annually by the Junior Class. 



To THE Public : — We wish to announce that the 
Year Book of the Class of 1902 is being compiled 
and that time, thought, work, and money are not 
being spared to make the XXXII Volume of the 
Index an accurate summary of the past college year 
and the mouthpiece of college thought and sentiment ; 
as well as an ornament and a credit to our college. 

To interest in the 1902 Index ^ who are interested 
in " Old Aggie " is the hope of 

The 1902 " Index " Board. 



'r\. 



DRAWING AND BLUE PROCESS PAPERS, 

SCALES, ANGLES, CURVES and T SQUARES, 

ARCHITECTS' AND DRAFTMEN'S COLORS, 

SCHOOL BOXES WATER COLORS, 



wiswoRTH, wm 

INCORPORATED, 
82 and 84 Washington St., \-r,p.Qrp^T^ 
216 and 218 Clarendon St., /^^°-^^^^' 
Factories, MALDEN, MASS. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. XI. 



AMHERST, MASS., NOVEMBER 7, 1900. 



NO. 4 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will be sent 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 



the Business Manager. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

CLARENCE EVERETT GORDON, 1901, Editor-in-Chief. 
NATHAN DAVIS WHITMAN, 1901, Business Manager. 
LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, 1902, Assistant Business Manager, 

Assistant Editors. 

CHARLES LESLIE RICE, 1901. 
THOMAS CASEY, 1901. 
CHARLES MILTON KINNEY, 1902. 
CLIFFORD ALBION TINKER, 1903. 



JAMES HENRY CHICKERING, 1901. 
HOWARD L.AWTON KNIGHT, 1902. 
ARTHUR LINCOLN DACY, 1902. 
NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN, 1903. 



Terms: $1.00 per year in adcance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside o* United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot-Ball Association, 
CoIIeg'e Boarding Club, 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

G. R. Bridgeforth, Pres. Athletic Association, 
C. L. Rice, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

J. H. Chickering Sec. Nineteen Hundred and Two Index, 

Reading-Room, C. T. Leslie, Secretary. 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
C. L. Rice, Manager. 
R. W, Morse, Manager. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



Edi-torials. 



We wish to call the attention of our alumni readers 
to a connmunication, found in another column, ad- 
dressed to them by a graduate whose interest in and 
support of M. A. C. athletics merits their courteous 
consideration of the opinions therein expressed. The 
writer has faithfully set forth in his communication 
the circumstances in which we found ourselves during 
the early part of the football season, and those in 
which we are now placed. We trust that our grad- 
uate members will see the situation in a favorable 
light at this most critical time. 



With the close of the 3'ear 1901, one of the most 
remarkable decades in history, more particularly, per- 
haps, in the history of a great movement in the inter- 
est of public education, will have been brought to an 
end. The great educational influence of this decade 
of expositions can never be measured ; it is too far- 



reaching. In view of the fact that the College is to 
be represented at the great Pan-Am,erican exposition 
to be held in Buffalo next year, we have considered it 
appropriate to publish concerning the exposition a few 
facts which we have obtained from reliable sources, in 
connection with a short outline of the proposed exhibit 
of the agricultural and horticultural resources of the 
State of Massachusetts. Both articles will be found 
elsewhere in this issue. 



Many will remember the attempt that was made a 
year or two ago to start a debating club. The idea 
did not meet with a very favorable reception at the 
time it was brought forward. It was put aside for a 
time, not because there was any objection to such a 
club but rather because there was a feeling that some- 
thing more important required the time and energy of 
the students. The other plans that were proposed 
never materialized, and so nothing came of our 
cherished hopes. The debating club is not a new 
idea, but it is a noble one. We venture to assert 



38 



AGGIE LIFE 



without fear of contradiction that taking part in a 
rightly conducted debate results in more genuine help 
to the average man than does any other manner of 
public speaking. Those who have had any experience 
at all will recall with pleasure and satisfaction the 
fiery debates and jolly times held in the old debating 
hall. We learn that a club has been organized and 
that a debate has been arranged for. May the Club 
grow and prosper and enjoy a useful life. 



THE PAN-AMERICAN EXPOSITION. 

In order to set forth the difficulty of the task of 
deciding which of the features of the great Pan- 
American exposition is most to be praised one writer 
has taken a pretty and familar story from Greek 
mythology. The young shepherd boy, Paris, who, it 
will be remembered, afterward eloped with the cele- 
brated Helen of Troy was once brought face to face 
with a most perplexing proposition. He was compel- 
led to decide which of the three handsome goddesses, 
Venus, Menerva or Juno, was the most beautiful. In 
awarding the prize for beauty to the Goddess of Love 
he must needs incur the enmity of the two other fair 
divinities. " But," says the same writer, " the task 
which Paris had was trifling compared with that of 
deciding which of the many beautiful features of the 
Pan-American exposition is most to be admired." The 
exposition indeed promises to be one of "unrivalled 
beauty " and one whose educational and commercial 
influence will be far-reaching. 

The city of Buffalo has been busy for many months 
in the solution of the great problem of how to accom- 
modate the immense concourse of people who will 
flock to that city next summer. The attendance bids 
fair to be nearly as large as that of the World's Fair 
at Chicago, for within a radius of 500 miles of Buffalo 
there is a population of some 40,000,000. If the 
exposition promises to be a brilliant success it is prob- 
able that the greater proportion of this population will 
want to see it at some time during the six months 
that it will be in progress. Between the first of May 
and the first of November, 1901, there will be held 
in Buffalo a large number of conventions of different 
societies which will in themselves bring to the exposi- 
tion a large number of visitors. The various steam 
transportation lines, and the International Traction 
company which controls the trolly lines of Buffalo and 



its vicinity, are making extensive preparations to 
handle the great traffic, the International company 
expending $3,000,000 in the improvement and exten- 
sion of its lines. A large number of new hotels are 
being erected and several apartment houses are being 
transformed into hotels in anticipation of the great 
demand for accommodation next summer. Tempor- 
ary structures to serve the purpose of hotels will also 
be built; and it is hoped that by all these precautions 
the problem of handling the great crowds who will 
attend the exposition will be satisfactorily solved. 

" Persons who contemplate attending," says one 
paper, " need not fear that there will be any special 
difficulty in their obtaining accommodations during 
their stay, which will be comfortable and convenient 
at prices within reach of their means, and reasonable 
and just in view of the extraordinary demand for such 
accommodation." ■ 

One of the novelties of the exposition will be the 
village of the Six Nation Indians which is intended as 
an historical exhibit of the aboriginal people of the 
eastern part of the United States. The village will 
be surrounded by a stocade such as was built by the 
Indians in the olden times to protect the villages from 
the unexpected attack of the enemy. Within this 
stockade these descendants of the Red Men who once 
held sway over all that part of the country where the 
exposition is to be held, will live just as their ancestors 
lived several hundred years ago. Their dwellings will 
be " long houses " built of poles and covered with 
bark, and their meals will be prepared as the Indians 
of the Iroquois League used to cook them in times 
long since gone by. 

Just outside the stockade will be several log 
cabins which will have association with Indian life. 
One of these will be made to represent a cabin of the 
white pioneers and another will be the identical log 
house in which Nancy Johnson, an aged Seneca 
squaw, and a member of one of the tribes of the 
Six Nations," has lived for the past century. This 
cabin was the oldest house on the Tonawanda Indian 
Reservation which is situated near Buffalo and the 
grounds of the exposition. It was taken apart and 
transported to the site of the Six Nations village, and 
set up just as it was before. It is in a clump of trees, 
where it looks as if it might have stood for an hun- 
dred years. In this cabin the venerable squaw who is 



AGGIE LIFE. 



39 



said by those who have examined the records to be 
120 years of age, will live and receive her friends 
during the progress of the exposition. The rebuilding 
of the cabin has just been completed the work having 
been done by Seneca Indians from the Tonawanda 
Reservation. The cabin is composed of logs of red 
beech which were hewn in the forest after the close of 
the Revolutionary war. They are so well preserved 
that the cabin would doubtless stand for another half 
century. This cabin and the old lady who will live 
here will be one of the most unique historical attrac- 
tions of the Pan-American exposition. 

Another interesting feature of the coming exposition is 
thegreatelectrictowerwhich will attain a height of 375 
feet. It will be ornamented by sculpture work repro- 
duced in staff and will be painted in tints of ivory, blue, 
green andgold.and in white, presenting a most beautiful 
sight. 

The fruit exhibit of the state of California, and 
especially of the southern end of the state, will be a 
very notable feature of the horticultural display. 

A great many other exhibits, too numerous to men- 
tion, of great educational and advertising value will 
make the exposition attractive and instructive, and 
probably many of the residents of the eastern states 
who could not afford the cost of visiting the Chicago, 
Atlanta, and Paris expositions will find it in their way 
to enjoy this one nearer home. 



PROPOSED EXHIBIT OF THE AGRICULTU- 
RAL AND HORTICULTURAL RESOURCES 
OF THE STATE OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

At the Pan-American Exposition Buffalo, N. Y., 
May 1 ST TO November 1 st, 1901. 

(1). An exhibit of the trees of Massachusetts, illus- 
trated by three sections of each specimen, one cut 
perpendicularly, a second radically, and the third tan- 
gentially. The exhibit will consist of three sections 
each of 63 trees, the whole appropriately mounted on 
card-board. The sections of each specimen will be 
accompanied by two photographs, one showing the 
tree in leaf, the other, the naked trunk and branches. 

(2). An exhibit illustrative of the development of 
horticulture. There will be three cases of some 25 
or 30 specimens of the original fruit or vegetable, and 
then by its side the model of the perfected one. 



(3). An exhibit of the entire spraying outfit for the 
gypsy moth and other injurious insects. 

(4). An exhibit showing the effects of electricity on 
germination and growth. 

(5). A series of 30 charts illustrating in graphic 
style by blocks of color, or by charts of figures, the 
following things. 

(a) Area in proportion to total area in the several 
classes of farm lands, as for example, forest pasture, 
mowing, tillage. 

(b) The same comparative with the United States 
and with selected states, as for example. New York, 
Pennsylvania, Illinois, Iowa. 

(c). Product, in proportion to total acreage, of lead- 
ing crops compared with the United States and se- 
lected states. 

(d). Product per selected unit of population (say 
100) of leading crops compared with United States 
and selected states. 

(e). Product per acre of leading crops compared 
with United States and selected states. 

(f). Orchards and fruits, — acreage, — proportion of 
total and of improved area compared with selected 
states. 

(g). Orchard and fruit acreage to selected unit of 
population compared with selected states. 

(h). Milch cows — number per acre of total area, of 
improved area, compared with United States and 
selected states. 

(r) Milch cows — number of selected units of pop- 
ulation compared with United States and with se- 
lected states. 

(j). Dairy products— milk, butter, etc., compared 
in a similar way to (h) and (i). 

(k). Hot-house products amount of unit compared 
with the United States and selected states. 

(1). Cranberries, acreage, value and proportion. 

(6). An exhibit will be made of the work of the 
Station in nematodes ; and of the apparatus used in the 
educational work of the College in botanical study. 

(a). A dozen or more samples of soils will be gath- 
ered from different portions of the state with an effort 
to get a soil typical of the section from which it is col- 
lected. Samples of lettuce, asparagus, tobacco and 
other market garden soils will be shown with maps of 
sections where these soils most abound. 

In brief, the agricultural industries of Massachu- 



40 



AGGIE LIFE, 



setts consist of (1) Dairy products, (2) Fodder crops, 
(3) Dairy cattle, swine, etc., (4) Poultry and poultry 
products, (5) Market garden products, (6) Fruits. 

With an illustrative exhibition in view, the aim will 
be to show in each one of these six departments the 
relative importance of that product to our department 
of the state of Massachusetts, comparing it with the 
United States and with other selected States. 



Aggie, 10; Vermont, 5. 

Aggie defeated the University of Vermont football 
team on Saturday, October 27, at Atherton Park in 
Burlington. Aggie made her first score in the middle 
of the first half when Bodfish got the ball on Patter- 
son's fumble, and carried it 35 yards for a touchdown. 
The second one came from a pretty 55 yard run by 
Chickering, who got the ball from Morse's kick from 
the 25-yard line after a touchback. Aggie's work in 
the first half was good, the game being played in a 
quick snappy manner, and the interferance being in- 
vincible. Vermont fumbled badly in this half and 
was slow in getting down under kicks. Their tackling 
was very weak, the men going in too high and often 
being thrown off. The ends were drawn in several 
times by tricks. In the second half Vermont took a 
brace and aided by some fouls by Aggie scored a 
touchdown. The goal was in danger again at the close 
of the game, but Aggie secured the ball and could 
have rushed it back if time had not been called. 

Vermont won the toss and took the west goal, 
Cooke kicked off to Robinson on the ten yard line. 
Then Vermont, by a series of rushes through the line 
and a run round McCobb's end, took the ball well 
into Aggie's territory only to lose it on Parker's fum- 
ble. Aggie then took the ball and by working the 
ends and tackles got the ball back to Vermont's 25 
yard line where it was lost on downs. On the second 
play Patterson dropped the ball, Bodfish seized it and 
aided by splendid interference by Barry ran 35 yards 
for a touchdown. Barry failed at goal. 

Waddell kicked off to the 5 yard line where Chick- 
ering got the ball and aided by strong blocking carried 
it to the center of the field. After a few plays Ver- 
mont got the ball, but could not gain which forced a 



kick from Morse. On the next play Aggie worked 
a criss-cross and then Chickering ran 25 yards around 
the end which brought the ball into Vermont's terri- 
tory. Here Cooke tried a goal from the field but 
fouled, Vermont getting a touch-back. Morse kicked 
from the 25 yard line. Chickering caught the ball 
and made a run down the left side of the field for a 
touchdown. Barry again failed at goal. A few more 
plays ended the half with the ball in Aggie's possession. 
Waddell kicked off in the second half. Aggie ad- 
vanced the ball about 25 yards, when the umpire took 
it away for a foul. Vermont could not gain on line 
plays but tried a quarter-back kick which brought the 
ball to Aggie's ten yard line. From this point the 
ball was rushed over the line. Hutchinson failed at 
goal. Cooke kicked off, Vermont worked the ball 
down the field aided by several fouls called by the um- 
pire, but lost it on Aggie's five yard line. The game 
ended with the ball in Aggie's possession on the ten 
yard line. The line up : 

AGGIE. 

Bodfish, r. e. 
Cooke, r. t. 
Gamwell, r. g. 
Paul, c. 
Snell, 1. g. 
Halligan, 1. t. 
McCobb, r. e. 
Whitman, q. b. 
Barry, r. h. b. 
Chickering, 1. h. b. 
Lewis, f. b. 



VERMO NT. 

r. e., Morse (Capt.) 

r. t., McKellow Phelps 

r. g., Orton 

c, Beckley 

1. g.. Parker 

1. t., Waddell 

r. e., Patterson 

q. b., Robinson 

r. h. b.. Welch 

1. h. b., Hutchinson 

f. b., Strait 

Umpire and referee — Rice and Page. Linesmen — Reed 
and Pierson. Timekeeper — Ritchie. Touchdowns — Chick- 
ering, Bodfish, Strait. Time^two 20 minute halves. 

Aggie, 17 ; Conn. Agri'l College, 6. 
. Aggie played her last home game with Conn. Agri'l 
college, Saturday, Nov. 3. The game was disap- 
pointing to us from a good many standpoints, since it 
proved that our team has not improved as it 
should have during the past week. The de- 
fense was not as strong as it should be, and the offen- 
sive play was very slow. The interference for end 
runs was as weak as water, the men running right by 
the tackles and never hitting a thing. The line was 
weak letting the Conn, men through at all points. The 
play was aided by numerous fumbles by the Conn, 
men as well as tricks which drew in the ends so that a 
winning score was possible, 



AGGIE LIFE. 



41 



Conn, won the toss and defended the south goal. 
Aggie kicked off and Conn, rushed the ball back down 
the field by means of line plunges, On Aggie's fif- 
teen yard line they hit the ball but Aggie could not 
gain and was forced to kick. Conn, again rushed the 
bal! down the field and succeeded in pushing it over 
after ten minutes of play. 

Aggie kicked off to Conn, and held them for downs 
then rushed the ball across the line for a touchdown, 
working Conn, with line plays and end runs. Conn, 
kicked off to Aggie, the ball was again rushed up the 
field and finally scored again on a quarter-back kick. 

In the second half Aggie held the ball for the 
greater part of the time, but on reaching Conn, three 
yard line could not push the ball over. Cooke fell 
back and kicked the first goal from the field that has 
been scored in any of our games this season. The 
game ended with the ball in Aggie's possession on the 
Conn. 15 yard line. 

The line-up : 



M. A. C. 

O'Hearn, 1. e. 
Halligan, 1. t. 
Snell, 1. g. 
Paul, c. 
Gamwell, r. g. 
Cooke (capt), r. t. 
Bodfish, r. e. 
Whitman, q. b. 
Chickering, 1. h. b. 
Barry, r. h. b, 
Lewis, f. b. 



c. A. c. 

r. e., Blakeslee 

r. t.. Carpenter (capt) 

r. g., Clark 

c, Baleatt 

1. g., Harvey 

1. t., Twing 

1. e., Downing 

q. b., Osmond 

r. h. b., McLean 

1. h. b., Lyman 

f. b., A. N. Clark 



Score, M. A. C. 17, C. A. C. 6. Touchdowns, Lyman, 
Lewis, Whitman. Goals from touchdowns, Barry 2, Clark. 
Goal from field, Cooke. Umpire, Knowles. Referee, Halli- 
gan. Linesmen, Gates and Smith. Time 20m. halves. 



ln'tercolle;giatf . 



Yale's total registration shows a slight falling off 
this year. 

Harvard has but two hundred and thirteen scholar- 
ships for her three thousand or more students. 

Electives at Tufts are to be more closely restricted 
in the future. The number of prescribed studies will 
soon be increased about twenty per cent. 

The agreement whereby Harvard agreed to play the 
University of Pennsylvania each season in football has 



been dissolved. How much the McCracken incident 
may have had to do with this is uncertain. 

An athletic league of the Maine colleges, Bates, 
Bowdoin, Colby and University of Maine has been 
talked of, but Bowdoin has refused to enter, alleging 
tendencies toward professionalism on the part of some 
of the other colleges. 

The highest football score reported so far this sea- 
son is 84 to 0, made by Georgetown University against 
Richmond College. Probably the highest in this 
vicinity is 72 to made by Cushing Academy against 
Vermont Academy, 

There are about four hundred collegiate institutions 
in this country representing between one and two 
hundred thousand students. In almost everyone there 
has been an increase in numbers during the past year 
and in many the increase has been very marked. 

Students of the University of Chicago recently 
showed the right sort of college spirit. The football 
team returned from Philadelphia after the most disas- 
trous defeat in the history of the university, to be met 
by the students and treated almost as a victorious 
eleven. 

Compulsory gymnasium drill for the Senior class at 
Amherst College has been abolished by a unanimous 
vote of the faculty. Considering the high value 
Amherst affect to set on gymnasium drills, it will be 
of interest to note how many Seniors take the course 
now that it is elective. 

Harvard and M. I. T. indulged in one of their semi- 
occasional scraps the night of the Republican parade 
in Boston. Harvard attempted to drive some of the 
Tech men off the steps of their own building and a 
lively rush resulted. Harvard came out as she 
deserved — second best. 

The current number of the Connecticut Agricultural 
College Lookout contains an instructive article on 
" Student Labor" in the various colleges. Connecti- 
cut is the only college in the country where compul- 
sory labor without renumeration is still insisted upon. 
The amount and quality of the work done there deter- 
mines to quite an extent the rank of the student. At 
the other Agricultural colleges of the country, labor is 
paid for and furnished as a means of giving aid to 
needy students. 



42 



AGGIE LIFE. 



COMMUNICATION. 

Northampton, Mass., Oct. 27, 1900. 
Capt. John Anderson, 

Mass. Agricultural College, 

Amherst, Mass. 
Dear Sir: — The Republican City Committee beg 
that you will accept for yourself and tender to the 
men in your company our very hearty thanks for your 
courtesy in taking part in our demonstration last night, 
and our appreciation for the fine showing that you 
made. 

We fear that the committee in charge, in their 
anxiety to show your organization to as many of our 
people as possible, may have lengthened the line of 
march unduly and made this town seem bigger to 
some of your people than they ever thought it was 
before. Be assured that we shall consider our obli- 
gation to you undischarged for a long time, and that 
you may command us and our resources to their limit. 
Yours very sincerely, 

Ernest W. Hardy, Chairman. 



TO ALUMNI. 

(Communication. ) 

The work of our foot-ball team this season has been 
a source of the greatest gratification to all those who 
are connected with the college : undergraduates, fac- 
ulty, and local alumni. Our single disappointment, 
the Trinity game, has been more than made up for by 
the victory over the strong Vermont eleven, which, 
the week before, had played Dartmouth's best team to 
a standstill. This, too, after a tiresome journey of 
over two hundred miles to the home grounds of our 
opponents. 

I would now, on no other ground than that of my 
interest in the college as one of its graduates, submit 
to non-resident alumni the circumstances under which 
these results have been attained. The football asso- 
ciation found itself, at the opening of the season ham- 
pered with a debt of some $140, incurred by poor 
management of the base ball association. This, 
according to the rules of the Athletic Board, had to 
be paid before operations could go on. Upon the 
opening of college the undergraduates voted a tax of 
$3.50 per man and enough was paid in on the first 
day to meet this debt. With the further proceeds of 
this tax, together with a very liberal subscription by 



the faculty, we were able to employ a coach for a 
short time and, by close calculation, will meet the 
other ordinary expenses of the season. 

There still remains to be played what has come to 
be the climax of our football season, the game with 
Amherst College, on Nov. 17. At our sister institu- 
tion three first-class coaches, old Harvard players, 
have been employed this year through the aid of the 
alumni and everything possible has been done to turn 
out a strong team. To any Aggie graduate, having 
in mind the results of the past two years' games, the 
object of these extraordinary efforts will not be 
entirely obscure. In spite of this it is a conservative, 
opinion that with more coaching from now on Aggie 
can put the better team on the field. With some 
outside help this can be done. A personal appeal to a 
few alumni has already received a generous response 
but with the matter of an athletic field soon to come 
up it does not seem wise to make a general solicita- 
tion of this nature. This statement is therefore made 
in order that all who desire to show their interest in 
the college in a practical way may avail themselves 
of a most opportune time for doing so. 

Ralph E. Smith, '94. 

Sec. and Treas. M. A. C. Athletic Board. 



THE NATURAL HISTORY CLUB. 

A TRIP TO MT. HOLYOKE. 

On Saturday, Nov. 3, instead of the trip to the 
asbestos mine in Pelham which had been planned but 
which it was thought best to postpone, a few of the 
Club went to Mt. Holyoke, taking the electric car to 
Old Hadley and walking from there to the mountain. 
The ascent was made on the river side by means of a 
zigzag path which winds up the slope not far from the 
covered cable-car track. Although the climb was a 
toilsome one the effort was more than offset by the 
grand view, obtained from the summit, of the hills to 
the north and west, the fertile fields of Hadley, and a 
long stretch of the Connecticut river. A slight mist 
in the atmosphere rather enhanced than spoiled the 
view. Evidences of glacial action were found in 
three or four places. On the south side of the moun- 
tain house in a pit preserved by a retaining wall, when 
the rest of the surrounding rock was covered with a 
suitable grass soil, is a mass of polished rock with 
here and there a deep groove furrowed out of the 



AGGIE LIFE. 



43 



solid mass. In one place there appeared to be a 
number of smaller strias, parallel furrows scraped out 
of the rock which all about was worn as smooth 
almost as a mirror. The rock at this particular point 
was more smoothly polished than at any other place, 
so far as was discovered. On the nothern side of 
the summit house were found two or three other re- 
markable troughs one of which was very pronounced 
and deep. Other indications which the presence of 
the more indisputable traces tended only to strengthen 
were noticed. The general direction of all strias was 
only a few degrees from a north and south course. 
These strias were probably made, according to Dana, 
by the main glacier which covered New England. 
According to the same authority there are marks to 
be found in the valley which have a direction south- 
southeast and which point to the existence of what he 
pleases to call a separate Connecticut River glacier 
which although a part of the main glacier was never- 
theless compelled by the contour of the valley to take 
a separate course. No marks which seemed to have 
been made by this separate glacier on Mt. Holyoke 
were found by the members of the company. The 
party arrived in Amherst shortly after noon, and all 
report an enjoyable time. 

At a recent meeting of the executive committee 
of the Club two sub-comm.ittees were chosen, one of 
which is to arrange a programme for the meetings of 
the Club during the winter, the other is to arrange for 
a series of lectures which it is hoped the society may 
be able to arrange for the winter months. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COL- 
LEGE CLUB OF NEW YORK. 

Concluded. 

Class of 1879. 
Edgar D, Chittenden, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Class of 1880. 
Willis W. Cary, Fishkill, N. Y. 
Alvan L. Fowler, 119 Mercer St.. New York City. 

Class of 1881. 
Charles L. Flint, 25 Congress St., Boston, Mass. 
Austin Peters, D. V. S., M. C. V. S., Common- 
wealth Bldg., Boston, Mass. 
Edward B. Rawson, 226 E 6th St.. New York City. 
Ben. S. Smith, 32 Nassau St., New York City. 



Clarence D. Warner, 1114 Pine St., St. Louis, Mo. 
Charles E. Young, M. D., White Plains, N. Y. 

Class of 1882. 

Charles E. Beach, West Hartford, Conn. 

Harry K. Chase, 426 West Broadway, New York City. 

John A. Cutter, M. D., 120 Broadway, New York City. 

Samuel J. Holmes, 167 Chambers St., New York City. 

Edward S. Jones, 824 Main St., Worcester, Mass. 

Burton A. Kinney, with Knowlton & Beach, Roches- 
ter, N. Y. 

Herbert Myrick, Springfield, Mass. 

James B. Paige, D. V. S., Prof, of Veterinary 
Science, Amherst. Mass. 

Charles B. Perkins, 132 Commercial St. .Boston, Mass. 

John C. Piatt, 333 Fourth Ave., New York City. 

James S. Williams, Glastonbury, Conn. 

Class of 1883. 
Alfred A. Hevia, 155 Broadway, New York City. 
Joseph B, Lindsey, Ph, D., Chemist Experiment Sta- 
tion, Amherst, Mass. 

Class of 1884 
Elisha A. Jones, Farm Superintendent, M. A. C, 

Amherst, Mass. 
Alfred W. Lublin, 56 Bedford St.. Boston, Mass. 

Class of 1885. 
George H. Barber,M.D., U. S. N., Washington, D, C. 
Albert H. Chadbourne, 912 Hanson Bldg., Philadel- 
phia, Penn. 
Hezekiah Howell, Monroe, N. Y. 
Benoni Tekirian, Turkey in Asia. 
George G. Woodhull, Bainbridge, Ga. 

Class of 1886. 

Winfield Ayres, M. D., 1 12 West 94th St., New York 
City. 

William A. Eaton, Nyack, N. Y. 

George E. Stone, Ph. D., Professor of Botany, Am- 
herst, Mass. 

Class of 1887. 
Frederick C. Allen, 17-19 Vanderwater St.. New 

York City. 
Edward R. Flint, Ph. D., Clifton, Mass. 

Class of 1889. 
Frederick R. Huse, 95 Blackstone St., Boston, Mass. 



44 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Class of 1892. 
George B. Willard, Waltham, Mass. 

Class of 1893. 
Charles A. Goodrich, M. D.. Hartford, Conn. 

Class of 1894. 
Louis E. Goessmann, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Class of 1896. 
Frederick H. Read, Woonsocket, R. I. 

Class of 1897, 
Charles I, Goessmann, Amherst, Mass. 

Class of 1898. 
Julian S. Eaton, Nyack, N. Y. 



^olle^f f^otfs- 



— The Aggie Life Board sat for photographs 
Wednesday. 

— Shaffrath, '01, has been ill for a few days, but is 
now recovered. 

— There was no drill on Monday because of the 
trip to Springfield. 

— O'Hearn, 1903, has returned to College after a 
prolonged vacation. 

— R. W. Morse, 1902, spent Monday in Brattleboro, 
Vermont on business, 

— Tinker, '03, has been called home because of 
the sickness of his mother. 

— Members of the Y. M. C. A. are gathering each 
evening at 6-30 for prayers. 

— Inspection of dormitories was omitted on the 27th 
because of the Northampton parade. 

— Prof. Hasbrouck has returned to his classes after 
a very much lengthened stay at his home. 

— Fire drill has been arranged and officers ap- 
pointed. Major Dlckerman is in command. 

— The Seniors have finished the first three chap- 
ters of Pettit's " Elements of Military Science." 

— Our foot-ball victory over the University of Ver- 
mont of 10 to 5 was both pleasing and encouraging. 

— The " second team " played a very unsatisfactory 
game with Holyoke High school, the score being 0-0. 

— The Union Lecture course began with a musical 
entertainment and a large audience Wednesday night. 



• — The sophomore's rope decorations indicate the 
result of the Freshman-Sophomore annual tug-of- 
war. 

— The foot-ball team did not practice Wednesday 
afternoon that the men might see the Amherst-Tufts 
game. 

— Professor C. S. Walker preached in the church 
at Hadley Sunday, exchanging with Rev. E. E. 
Keedy. 

— The Freshmen lined up against the Juniors Fri- 
day afternoon. The result was 6 to in favor of the 
Juniors. 

— Allen, 1903, entertained his parents over Sun- 
day recently. Griffin, 1904, also enjoyed a short 
visit from his father. 

■ — Prof. Maynard spent several days last week in 
Cromwell, Conn., lopking over the greenhouses of A. 
N. Pierson's new plant. 

— Dr. Wellington gave an address before the 
Grange on Friday, Nov. 2. His subject was " The 
Education of the Farmer's Boy." 

— Professor Churchill of Amherst college gave a 
talk Friday evening, November 2nd, before the mem- 
bers of the Shakespearean Club, on the tragedy of 
Richard III. 

— The batallion took part in a parade at Springfield, 
Monday evening. Supper was served at four o'clock, 
the men leaving on the 5-14 train and returning 
shortly after mid-night. 

— President Goodell and Professor Brooks repre- 
sented this College at the inauguration of Dr. Henry 
S. Pritchett, the new president at M. I. T. The cer- 
emony took place at Worcester on Oct. 25. 

—A much needed operation has been performed on 
the chapel organ. It has been tuned and generally 
overhauled. This will be gladly learned by those com- 
ing under the rule of compulsory morning exercises. 

— On account of the short afternoons for the next 
two weeks football practice on drill days will be before 
drill, The hour of assembly have been changed 
from 3-30 to 4 to accommodate the new arrangement, 

— Professor Hart of Harvard University and Con- 
gressman Gillett addressed the members of the Am- 
herst College Republican club, and the invited public 
Wednesday evening, Oct. 31st in College hall on the 
issues of the presidential campaign. 



AGGIE LIFEo 



45 



— Three companies, numbering seventy-five men, 
marched in the republican parade in Northampton 
Friday night. Major Dickerman commanded. The 
parade was a success, having a Une of march of about 
six miles and containing many novel and interesting 
features. Our position was directly in rear of the 
band. 

— A debating society has been organized with the 
following named officers : President, Thomas Casey '< 
secretary, James H. Chickering. A debate has been 
arranged for Wednesday, November 7th; subject, 
Resolved, That the cut system of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College is a just system. W. W. Pee- 
bles and H. J. Franklin for the affirmative ; F. W. 
Webster and M. H. West for the negative. Meeting 
will be held at 7-30. 

— Two live rattlesnakes were recently received by 
W. R. Pierson, 1901, from a friend in Connecticut. 
They were presented to the Zoological department of 
the College and are now on exhibition in the Zoologi- 
cal laboratory. The creatures are confined in a glass 
cage covered with heavy wire screen cloth which no 
one has yet been courageous enough to sit on. They 
will be kept alive for some time but will finally go to 
increase the collection in the museum. They were 
sent by express and marked with the horrid title of 
" Rattlesnakes." Of course the company seal was 
unnecessary, and the box arrived unopened, showing 
no signs of having been tampered with. 



HYGIENE FOR COLLEGIANS.— I. FOOD. 

BY JOHN ASHBURTON CUTTER, M. D., President of the 
Mass. Agr'l College Club of New York. 

In this article I wish to treat briefly of some of our 
more common foods such as air, water, beef, lamb, 
mutton, wheat, potato, oatmeal, spinach, butter, etc., 
and of their effect on the system. 

The direct feeding for the intellect that comes 
through the Faculty is another province. 

Air is our first food in life and our last. Its impor- 
tance as food is too little estimated. Students work 
in a room in the evenings with lamps or gas burning, 
stove or steam heat, windows closed, and wonder 
why at half past nine or ten o'clock, it is so hard 
to close up the matter on hand ; why does not that 
German translation work out ? what is the trouble 



with this problem in trigonometry? The real cause 
is forgotten, and the victim of carbonic acid gas only 
flounders along. Now, be it even in the middle of the 
winter, to open the window and blow out the poisonous 
gases in the room, will hurt no one. The pure air 
will bring refreshment and will clear the intellect, 
resulting in happy solutions of the intricate problems 
on hand. Do not be afraid of fresh air. 

The necessity of the use of good water for drink is 
now engrossing the attention of the thinking public ; 
the examinations of samples of water by local and 
State Boards of Health, and the work done by the 
Agricultural Experiment Stations have been productive 
of much good. Typhoid fever does not kill as it used 
to ; sink drains are no longer emptied from a kitchen 
within ten feet of wells as in years only too recent. 

Man is seventy-five per cent, water ; every tissue 
contains it. Many chronic diseases are ameliorated 
by the addition or increase of good water to the diet- 
ary. But there are waters to be avoided. All car- 
bonated drinks are evil. They only add to the 
troubles, so prevalent among Americans, the results of 
the fermentation of starches and sugar into carbonic 
acid gas, alcohol and vinegar, which goes on in the 
stomach. Physicians have logically traced death, oc- 
curring in bed in the early morning hours, to the free 
use of carbonated drinks at a banquet of the night be- 
fore. Carbonic acid gas by osmosis through the 
stomach and pericardium, paralyses the heart more 
or less, and heart failure sometimes results. 

Avoid, moreover, waters with salines. The various 
brands on the market to-day, some of which are 
loaded up as high as half an ounce of salts to the gal- 
lon, are of positive injury to the drinker. It is com- 
mon for such waters to be drunk for stone in the kid- 
ney; they effectually dissolve the particular chemical 
form of concretion existing, but then go on to deposit 
one of their own formula ; the condition resulting is 
worse than the first. It is best to advise the use of 
natural spring waters which contain not more than ten 
grains of salts to the gallon. The less of such salts 
the better. This leads to a consideration of distilled 
water. Much has been said of late in both scientific 
and other papers concerning the alleged dangers of 
drinking distilled water. My personal experience is 
that it does not destroy epithelia of stomach, as is 
claimed ; my own supply of water in my house is dis- 



46 



AGGIE LIFE. 



tilled, but it is aerated. Distilled water, without aera- 
tion of the distillate by dropping through the air, is not 
pleasant drinking. Aerated distilled water is pleasant 
to the palate, and is the best solvent of concretions in 
any form in the body that we know of, because it is 
neutral and leaves no stone of its own behind. 

Our athletes going abroad suffer from the change 
of water; why not carry their own stills and, wherever 
they are, distill from the local product. I believe that 
there would be less breaking down of contestants who 
have had to leave their natural habitat. While I am 
writing for supposedly healthy individuals, let me say 
that asthma, rheumatism, gall stones, calculi in the 
kidneys, bladder, and intestines, are all forms of gravel 
diseases. It is well in youth to use good water and be 
better prepared for old age, than to wait till disaster 
has come and the need of repair is great with chances 
of cure greatly diminished. 

Beef is man's prime food from the animal kingdom 
and is elaborated by the ox from hay, grass, oats and 
other vegetables, which man should not eat. It 
relishes better than all other foods ; on it. with water, 
man can live alone, that is, if properly cooked. It 
does not produce rheumatism or gout but instead is 
used in the treatment of these affections successfully. 
It is employed as the foundation of treatment of many 
chronic diseases. The beef-fed nations are the 
healthiest — are the freest from germ diseases, and 
have the greatest endurance and courage. 

Beef should never be eaten raw ; it is best cooked 
by roasting or broiling— boiling and frying are not as 
good methods. These statements may provoke argu- 
ment. I cannot here go into the facts back of them ; 
suffice it to say, that they are based on the study of 
hundreds of people whose blood and other fluids have 
been assiduously studied microscopically, while apply- 
ing the ordinary tests that obtain in the practice of 
clinical medicine. Beef was made by the Creator to 
be freely eaten by man, and is his best friend among 
the foods, excepting water. 

Mutton comes next with its younger brother 
lamb ; the dark meat of turkey, fowl or game are 
more nourishing than light meats. Oysters, fish, 
shell fish have their place but subsidiary to meats. 
They cannot be lived on indefinitely as foods with 
water alone. 

Dyspepsia has been noted as an American ailment ; 



I have seen in fourteen years of practice but four 
cases of beef dyspepsia ; while the number resulting 
from fish, eggs, and vegetable food, are legion. 

Eggs should be eaten fresh. Strangely the ordinary 
conception is that the yolk is the more digestible of 
the two parts of the egg; this is not so; the whites 
dropped in boiling water and cooked moderately hard 
are well borne by the most delicate stomach ; while 
the yolks if excessively eaten by the well, will produce 
cystinic rheumatism, characterized in the blood mor- 
phology by crystals marked with St. George's cross, 
and most excruciating pain. 

This is not saying that the yolks of eggs should not 
be eaten ; I am but stating what they can do with 
some individuals when excessively fed. 

Wheat is man's prime food from the vegetable 
kingdom : the Roman soldier ate it raw and was a 
good fighter. It is given to man to-day in many 
forms and rightly deserves its high place. 

Oatmeal is good for horses and cattle, also good 
for doctors whose pockets it helps keep filled. The 
Scotch live in spite of it — those that do not die in 
childhood. It produces effective forms of cystinic 
rheumatism. It has cursed many a student, who 
impoverished in funds, has subsisted on oatmeal and 
thereby laid the foundation for future ills which have 
clung to him more or less closely through life. 
Chemically it is a good food ; morphologically it is not 
and it gives the bowels severe problems in digestion. 
To-day the preparations on the market are somewhat 
better prepared as they have been cooked — at least 
that is what is claimed. But it is much easier for 
mankind to feed the oats to the horse and ox and use 
their energy and beef. 

Potato is not a great nourisher — apparently has a 
place as a filler. Needs good cooking. 

Spinach is a fine food for many, agreeing well, 
especially with the liver. 

Celery is borne generally by all. 

Squash, Turnip, Carrots, Parsnips, are vegetables 
to be used as relishes. 

Milk and Butter. Two prime foods of the human 
race. Yet in the adult few can bear milk — this be- 
cause of its ability to absorb germs from the atmo- 
sphere causing thereby fermentation and biliousness. 
Butter is sometimes not well borne. But it is of all 
fat foods the best. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



47 



In subsequent papers I hope to further communi- 
cate with Life's readers on Fruits, Tea, Coffee and 
Tobacco and on Exercise and Baths. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

An attempt is being made to get a copy of the his- 
tory of every town and city in Massachusetts. Many 
have already been secured. Every student should make 
it a point to see that the library is presented with a 
history of his native town or city. 

Essays in English Literature by George Saintsbury. 
These essays are devoted to the period between the 
years 1780 and 1860, they seem to fill in the literary 
map of the period and are full of references, implied 
if not expressed, to other periods. Such men as 
Southey, Thomas Hood, Scott, Coleridge, and others 
perhaps not so well known, are taken as subjects ; the 
historical novel as presented by different authors is 
also discussed, and English war songs by Cambell and 
Songs of the Crimean War are made the subjects of 
interesting essays. 

Color in Nature by Marion I. Newbigin. This is a 
study in biology and is an attempt to set forth in sys- 
tematic order the main facts known in regard to the 
Pigments and Colours of plants and animals. Most 
objects, whether animate or inanimate, present them- 
selves to our eyes as coloured, as it is absurd to sepa- 
rate the phenomena of colour as they appear in or- 
ganisms from the similar phenomena of inorganic 
nature. Colour and markings often exhibit extraordi- 
nary constancy ; they often tend to reappear in slightly 
modified forms in a large series of nearly related 
organisms. This constancy of colour, or marking, is 
not infrequently available for the purpose of classifica- 
tion. The subjects considered are so' important that 
the book is exceedingly valuable for any student of 
biology. The book is well written but lacks illustra- 
tions. 

Elementary Meteorology by Frank Waldo, late junior 
professor in the United States Signal Service. 
Meteorology is now recognized as an independent 
science. During the past twenty years much that is 
new has been learned. For many hundreds of years 
the more apparent atmospheric conditions have been 
the subject of observation and comment, but it is only 
in the past two or three centuries that accurate obser- 
vations and trustworthy records have been accumu- 



lated. The book was intended, originally, to serve as 
a text-book of the elements of the science for general 
students. The English system of measurements is 
given as is necessary for a book that is intended for 
use in our educational institutions. The definitions 
are very simple and clear, and the maps and illus- 
trations are also very good. 

A Study in Warwickshire Dialect by Appleton Mor- 
gan. This is the fourth edition and contains a glos- 
sary and notes concerning the Edward the Sixth Gram- 
mar Schools and the Elizabethan pronunciation as 
deduced from the puns in Shakespeare's plays, and as 
to influence which may have shaped the Shakespearean 
vocabulary. The author first discusses the environ- 
ment, then takes up the glossary and the way Shakes- 
peare heard his English pronounced in London. The 
work is especially valuable for students of old English, 
the glossary being perhaps the best part of it. The 
author is a thorough student of Shakespeare and one 
who is qualified, if any one can be said to be, to write 
upon this subject. 

In the Tiger Jungle, and other stories of missionary 
work among the Telugus of India, by Rev. Jacob 
Chamberlain. This book is a good proof that young 
people need not patronize the dime novel to find stir- 
ring adventure and thrilling narrrtive. The author of 
this book was for many years a missionary in India 
and has an ability to make even a commonplace 
story interesting. The titles of the chapters give us 
an idea as to the character of the book and engage 
the attention of every reader. In the Tiger Jungle, 
Encounter with a Ten-foot Serpent, Treated with a 
Shower of Stones, are good examples. 



THE GIRL NEXT DOOR. 

I am slow but the World is fast. 

And I dote on rest and peace. 
So I drew away from the dizzy pall, 

And bade for a life of ease. 

I'm in love with the girl next door. 
Though 1 never have seen her face. 

But 1 know by the way she carries her head, 
She is filled with a dainty grace. 

It is fifty steps or more 

To that house across the lawn. 
And I mean each day to make a call, 

Then I wait till each day is gone. 



48 



AGGIE LIFE. 



I have sat and watched the house, 

I have seen a flitting form, 
And my sluggish blood for once is stirred 

With a feeling rich and warm. 

I have seen her at the door. 

Or under the apple tree, 
But I lose the look on the unseen face, 

That has grown so dear to me. 

She is like the girl of a dream. 

Distinct, yet so obscure ; 
Her distant face has an oval shape 

And it's honest and good I'm sure. 

She's just the girl for me, 

I think of it more and more, 
I'll get my man to wheel me across 

To propose to the girl next door. 

I've seen the girl next door ; 

She's fifty if she's a year, 
I didn't propose, for I never could stand 

To have that woman near. 

I'll live my Hfe alone. 

Just as I did before ; 
And you'd better believe I'll never propose 

To the servant girl next door. 

C. L. F. 



The fifteenth annual banquet of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College club of New York will take place 
at the Hotel St. Dennis, Broadway and 4th Sts. , Friday 
evening, December 7th, at 6-30 o'clock. 

'88. — Viscount Y. Mishimais farmingat 5 Shuruda 
Kzabukar, Toklo, Japan. 

'89.— Married, Oct. 4, 1900, Dwight L. Hubbard 
to Miss Florence Cummings of Ciielmsford. They 
will reside at No 74 Elmira St., Brighton, Mass. 

'90.— F. J. Smith of Elizabeth, N. S., has become 
the father of a son, born Oct. 28. 

'90. — F. J. Mossman formerly assistant chemist 
In the department of foods and feeding. Hatch Exper- 
iment station is now a fruit grower in Westminister, Mass. 

'90.— C. H. Jones of Burlington, Vt., is visiting at 
his home, Dower's Grove, 111. 

'91. — The next reunion of the class will be held at 
the next commencement. The wives of the mem- 
bers of the class will be invited to the banquet. 

'91. — Class secretary, Frank L. Arnold, with 
Bowker Fertilizer Company, Elizabeth, N. J. 



'00. — Y. H. Canto, Medical student at Columbia 
University. Address 314 West 58 St., New York. 

'00. — J. W. Kellogg has been appointed assistant 
chemist in the division of foods and feeding, Hatch 
Experiment station. 

'00. — F. H. Brown has returned from his vacation 
to his duties at the Hatch Experiment station. 

'00. — H. L. Crane has returned from a trip to the 
Pierson homestead at Cromwell, Conn., where he 
has been studying greenhouse construction. 

'00. — F. G. Stanley of Harvard Medical school, 
resides at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, Newton, Mass. 

Ex-'Ol. — C. Winthrop Jones is now with Meekins, 
Packard & Wheat of Springfield. 

The alumni soliciting committee of the College 
Y. M. C. A. wish to thank those alumni who have 
contributed for the support of the organization. 



L. C. Claflin, Editor-in-Chief. 
R. W. Morse, Business IVIanager. 

Ill 



DEI 



(VOLUME XXXII) 
Published Annually by the Junior Class. 



To THE Public : — We wish to announce that the 
Year Book of the Class of 1902 is being compiled 
and that time, thought, work, and money are not 
being spared to make the XXXI I Volume of the 
Index an accurate summary of the past college year 
and the mouthpiece of college thought and sentiment ; 
as well as an ornament and a credit to our college. 

To interest in the 1902 Index z\\ who are interested 
in " Old Aggie " is the hope of 

The 1902 " Index " Board. 



DRAWING AND BLUE PROCESS PAPERS, 

SCALES, ANGLES, CURVES and T SQUARES, 

ARCHITECTS' AND DRAFTMEN'S COLORS, 

SCHOOL BOXES WATER COLORS, 



INCORPORATED, 
82 and 84 Washington St., \ -onciT'nxr 
216 and 218 Clarendon St., / ^^^■^^^• 



ractories, MALDEN, MASS. 




VOL. XI. 



AMHERST. MASS., NOVEMBER 21, 1900 



NO. 5 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Studentsand Alumni are requested t9 contribute. Communications should be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will be sent 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

CLARENCE EVERETT GORDON, 1901, Editor-in-Chief. 
NATHAN DAVIS WHITMAN, 1901, Business Manager. 
LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, 1902, Assistant Business Manager. 

Assistant Editors. 

CHARLES LESLIE RICE, 1901. 
THOMAS CASEY, 1901. 
CHARLES MILTON KINNEY, 1902. 
CLIFFORD ALBION TINKER, 1903. 



JAMES HENRY CHICKERING, 1901. 
HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT, 1902. 
ARTHUR LINCOLN DACY, 1902. 
NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN, 1903. 



Terms: $1.00 per year in adcance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside of United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot- Ball Association, 

College Boarding Club, 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

G. R. Bridgeforth, Pres. Athletic Association, 
C. L. Rice, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

J. H. Chickering Sec. Nineteen Hundred and Two Index, 

Reading-Room, C. T. Leslie, Secretary. 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
C. L. Rice, Manager. 
R. W, Morse, Manager. 



Entered at the Post Office as secend-class mail matter. 



Cdl'toria^ls. 



The Life understands that still further improvements 
are to be made in the Drill Hall. It is rumored that 
the college authorities contemplate having the floor 
planed smooth, and repolished, thus making our Hall 
one of the finest dancing floors in this part of the 
country. The wood from which this floor was made 
must have been very dry when put in for it soon swelled 
to a permanent size and warped slightly at the same 
time. If the floor is put in perfect order the warping 
will probably never occur again. The Life would 
suggest a change in the system of lighting. If two 
arc-lights were put in the place of the many incan- 
descent lights, we are confident the running expenses 
would be reduced while the lighting capacity would be 
greatly increased. Capt. Anderson has already suc- 
ceeded in establishing improvements in the Drill Hall, 
and the Life wishes him all success in his application 
for these further benefits. 



The preparation of charts to illustrate the agricul- 
tural and horticultural industries of Massachusetts at 
the Pan-American exposition has brought to notice 
many inter-esting facts concerning the agricultural 
status of our state when compared with that of other 
states. In many cases the comparison is a very favor- 
able one for Massachusetts. We are not accustomed 
to think of our commonwealth as one engaged primar- 
ily with agricultural interests; we would rather consider 
her as a manufacturing state. For this reason we 
are prone to overlook the fact that she holds a place 
of considerable importance in the agriculture of the 
country, that in proportion to her size she occupies a 
very prominent place in certain branches of agricul- 
tural and horticultural pursuits, and that she Is busy in 
trying to solve many of the most important problems 
of the day. We wish to refer the reader to an article 
in this number entitled, " Massachusetts as an Agri- 
cultural State." 



Our football season has closed for the year 1900. 



50 



AGGIE LIFE 



With the Amherst game on Saturday last, unsatisfac- 
tory though it was, one of our most successful football 
seasons was brought to an end. What shall we say of 
this season's work? What most fitting comment can 
we make concerning the importance of our reasonable 
success on the oval during the three months just gone ? 
It seems better wisdom to view the season's work as 
a whole than to measure the importance of the final 
result by any one game. Some may be inclined to 
think that our defeat by Amherst takes away the 
credit of other victories. Such an opinion, if it be 
held, is certainly a narrow one. Defeats in football 
never detract from what has been done, but only from 
what might have been done ; and crying over them is 
like crying over spilled milk. Lamenting inexcusable 
errors is quite natural. The point is not that such 
lamenting is justifiable because natural, but rather that 
we may rightfully take pride in what we have done 
that remains and always will remain to our credit. 
Football teams have their " ups and downs," combi- 
nations of circumstances, often more uncertain in 
team work than in individual work, are what we have 
to reckon with, and while we should not make an open 
concession of this truth now, did there reman any 
more games to be played, yet with the end of the sea- 
son the fact must be conceded. The only way, of 
course, to prepare for emergencies is by hard, consist- 
ent practice to make uncertainty less certain and cer- 
tainty more nearly sure. We are not to judge, 
because out of ten games we have won but five, 
that we have not done anything creditably in those 
contests. With the exception of the Trinity and 
Amherst games, In both of which the plain fact is 
that our team did not play as they might have played, 
we have succeeded very well, especially in the games 
with the University of Vermont and with Williams. 
On the whole, the team has reflected credit on the 
' college ; has met the schedule which our football 
manager arranged in a very gratifying way. We have 
demonstrated that with our small numiber of students 
v/e can put the M. A. C. football team in most adverse 
circumstances, and can win the day or come off with 
honor. The Life extends congratulations to the team 
for the season's work. 



Amherst has arranged a course of lectures for the 
high school teachers of the vicinity. 



NEWSPAPER WORK AT ''AGGIE." 

It is probably not very widely known that news- 
paper work at "Aggie" began in the early years of the 
life of our College with the most active and arduous 
kind of journalism, that of editing part of the local 
town newspaper ; but to the first class which was 
graduated from the Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege came this by no means easy task. In the Am- 
herst Record o\ Oct. 26th, 1870, we find the follow- 
ing published under the heading, " The College and 
Its Department : " 

" Through the kindness of the publishers of the 
Record, the College has the pleasure of being repre- 
sented for the first time in a department of that news- 
paper placed under her control. For this opportunity 
the College is very thankful. The great success that 
the institution has met with in the three years it has 
been in operation has won for it a place of honor be- 
side the educational institutions of the State, while 
the little that (the College) has done for agriculture 
and education shows conclusively that it is a valuable 
auxiliary to the Commonwealth, (and one) with 
which she could not easily dispense. In view of this 
it seems appropriate that the College should have 
some means of presenting to the public her interests 
and of rendering herself more useful. The College 
was founded for the express purpose of benefiting 
agriculture and the mechanic arts and in order for 
her to do so, successfully, she not only must educate 
her pupils in the various branches of science but 
must disseminate, as far as possible, throughout the 
community the same knowledge that she is impart- 
ing to her students. By so doing she could more 
fully accomplish the work for which she was designed. 
As aiding in this respect this department has been 
established and it is hoped that it will be of great ser- 
vice to the institution." 

Such was the open declaration of six young men 
who, representing the student body of the College, un- 
derlook the editing of four columns of the Amherst 
Record. The task was not on easy one. Energy 
and ingenuity v/ere severely tasked to meet each 
week the responsibility that devolved upon their 
shoulders. No sooner were the trials of one week 
ended than those of another began. However, there 
is no doubt but that as time went on the task grew 
easier and easier, comparatively at least ; and that 



AGGIE LIFE. 



SI 



less anxiety was felt as experience worked its inevita- 
ble effect. Neither is there any doubt but that those 
harassed editors felt more than once with the poet 
that rejoicing over what has been well done to-day is 
better than worrying over the future or the unprofita- 
ble past. The day of satisfaction following the suc- 
cessful accomplishment of the week's work undoubt- 
edly seemed at the time but very short-lived when 
compared with the interminable weeks of hard, dogged 
work ; but when looked back upon in subsequent 
years, through that perspective which time alone 
gives and through which is seen the incalculable good 
which that hard training accomplished, those bright 
days grow even brighter, and overshadow the gloom- 
ier ones,or color them with their brighter hues. 

In speaking of those times Mr. Bowker, who was 
one of the first editors says : " I ran across a copy of 
this double-headed* paper a year ago and was 
struck with the audacity of the undertaking. 
Although I was not ashamed of the work ; but 
I am bound to admit that the editorial " blue pencil," 
either of Professor Parker, or of the editor of the 
Record, was used fearlessly and as we thought at the 
time, outrageously. I cannot understand, either, how 
the publisher of the Record was willing to give up half 
of his front page to a lot of M, A. C. students, espec- 
ially when the paper circulated all over town, and was 
as much the local organ of the old college as of the 
new. Neither can I understand how our faculty per- 
mitted us to undertake the work and expose our- 
selves, and perhaps the college, to criticism. How- 
ever, we had those invaluable qualities in the begin- 
ning of one's career, the courage and enthusiasm of 
youth, which enabled us to carry through the under- 
taking. It was splendid discipline, and the best part 
of it was the necessity of doing it every week, and not 
only in term time but throughout the vacation. We 
kept up the department during our last year, but I 
assure you we were glad to release the honor to our 
successors, who finally abandoned it. There is no 
drill in English composition like that of newspaper 
work. Personally I have found my experience in con- 
nection with newspapers, beginning with the Amherst 

*The paper had for a sub-heading over four columns 
appropriated for the use of the College the following: Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural college, edited by senior class, editors, 
W. H. Bowker, Wm. Wheeler, S. H. Richmond, L. B. Cas- 
well, G. C. Woolson, W. C. Ware. 



Record, of invaluable service to me in the conduct of 
my business, particularly in the advertising depart- 
ment. When one has written an article, had it set 
up in cold type and then read the proof before it is 
corrected, he begins to realize how little he knows of 
his own language, and the cussedness of the printer's 
devil." 

The editors declared their intention of devoting a 
good deal of the space in their columns to the depart- 
ments of the College, with particular attention to the 
agricultural. It was proposed to answer from time to 
time through the columns of the paper, questions con- 
cerning agriculture and the College itself. Inquiries 
were solicited, and the support of the students and the 
faculty was earnestly requested. The introductory 
article then closed with these words : " Hoping that it 
may become a permanent and useful feature of the 
College we present our first number to the public." 

The work of editing then went on, the editors 
closely adhering to the policy which they had mapped 
out. Articles appeared in each issue pertinent to 
agricultural topics of the day. A definite amount of 
space was reserved for college notes, while more im- 
portant happenings received the attention that was due 
them. There was a column headed " Colleges " in 
some issues which gave information gathered from 
different sources concerning other colleges. Such sub- 
jects as " Chemical Fertilizers," " Relation of Science 
to Agriculture," " Shall I Send my Farmer Boy to 
College," "Soils," ' ' Hints to Farmers," are good ex- 
amples of articles on agricultural subjects. Now and 
then, of course, the pressure of time or circumstance, 
or of both, may be detected; but on the whole the work 
was excellent. 

In the spring of 1871 a new board took control. 
The sub- heading was reduced in size to cover the 
width of only one column, but the number of col- 
umns remained the same. The paper ^as continued 
up to the close of the college year when the plan was 
abandoned. Such is the history of newspaper work 
as first attempted by students at M. A. C. 

In subsequent years an eight page sheet, known as 
"The Register ", was published at Commencement. 
It boasted no literary pretensions but simply aimed at 
giving a little data concerning college life and the 
alumni. "The Cycle " and '• Q. T. V. Quarterly," so- 
ciety organs, have been published from early years up 



52 



AGGIE LIFE, 



to the present time, but it was not until 1890 that the 
students brought out a representative publication. 
Oct. 1st, 1890, the Aggie Life was born. 

In the opening editorial of the first issue we find a 
statement of the editors concerning what should be 
the policy of the paper under their management. 
With reference to advancing the interests of the col- 
lege they wrote in part : " To accomplish this (that at 
which they aimed) we shall record all matters of gen- 
eral interest concerning the college and the alumni." 
In the ten years which have elapsed since the paper 
was started the general policy has been as first out- 
lined. 

The first editors certainly looked at the matter from 
the right point of view. The more faithfully the 
paper adheres to the idea which its title conveys the 
more interesting is it bound to be for those for whom 
it was brought into being. Those things which make 
a paper a necessity, which make the students and 
alumni reluctant to give it up, are what should first be 
considered. To furnish information concerning 
" Aggie " life should be the primary object of Aggie 
Life. 



MASSACHUSETTS AS AN AGRICULTURAL 
STATE. 

It is obvious that Massachusetts is a manufacturing 
state, yet its agricultural interests are so far-reaching 
and well developed, that it holds a high rank as an 
agricultural state. A comparison with the agricul- 
tural standing of the United States and other selected 
states, gives most interesting results which are in no 
sense derogatory to Massachusetts. A comparison 
of farm land, acre for acre, with the United States, 
New York, Illinois, Ohio, and other great agricultural 
states gives Massachusetts an enviable position in 
the agricultural world. It shows that a farmer with a 
moderate capital can make a better financial success 
in Massachusetts than in any other state. 

Let us, for example, take the potato crop of Massa- 
chusetts, comparing it with the whole United States. 
Since 1860 Massachusetts has, on an average, pro- 
duced from 90 to 125 bushels of potatoes per 
acre, being 25 per cent, more per acre, than the 
whole United States during that period. And in value 
per acre Massachusetts has led by nearly 50 per cent. 



Compared with the states of New York, Illinois, and 
Ohio, the averages are in about the same ratio. 

Another example is the corn crop. In number and 
values per acre, Massachusetts leads by 10 per 
cent, the product and values of either the United 
States or the states used in the former comparison. 
During the five years preceeding 1890, the average 
number of bushels per acre for Massachusetts were 
thirty-nine and thirty hundredths against twenty-five 
and sixty-four hundredths for the United States, 
During the same period the value in Massachusetts, 
per acre, was $23.90, while for the United States it 
only reached the sum of $8.50, showing a balance of 
$15.15 for Massachusetts; and the value of rye and 
oats are more than 45 per cent, higher than of the 
United States. 

In the entire product of the United States, Massa- 
chusetts plays a comparatively small part ; but when 
averages, acre by acre, are considered Massachusetts 
leads in all the important crops. Tobacco yields from 
one to five hundred pounds per acre more than any 
other state and commands a higher price in the mar- 
ket, than any other domestic production, not excepting 
Tennessee or Kentucky. The dairying and horticul- 
tural interests of Massachusetts are enormous. The 
value of dairy products alone, in 1895 being about 
seventeen millions of dollars ; ninety-three million gal- 
lons of milk being sold. And the cranberry crop has 
a yearly value of over a million dollars. Farm wages 
are higher, and the farm-hand better paid than in 
other states. The valuation of farm buildings is also 
relatively higher than in other states. 

The primary cause of the successful and even 
flourishing agricultural condition of Massachusetts, is 
readily traced to the following fact : That the average 
farmer of this state is better educated and more in- 
telligent than the average farmer of other states. 

Educated and skilled farm labor is just as neces- 
sary for the successful and profitable production of 
crops, as the skilled mechanic is necessary for the 
construction of a steam-engine. Massachusetts is noted 
for its educational institutions ; its public schools col- 
leges, and universities. Scarcely a village is there, which 
does not boast a high school or academy, With these 
facilities for the dispersion of knowledge and the train- 
ing of the youth, it is small wonder that Massa 
chusetts leads the nation In the percentage of 



AGGIE LIFE. 



53 



rural education and intelligence. The Massachusetts 
farmer knows how and when to take advantage of 
soil and climatic conditions, and by careful and pains- 
taking experiments has raised the soil to a high state 
of productiveness. 

A factor in the production is the natural richness of 
the soil. Prehistoric glaciers and rivers covered the 
central and western part of the state with a deposit of 
rich loam. Add to this the scientific use of fertilizers 
and valuable crops are a foregone conclusion. 

The protecting forests of the northern states, Maine, 
Vermont and New Hampshire, make the vallev of the 
Connecticut warm and fertile and render possible the 
production of tobacco and grapes of the first quality 
and of the best variety. 

Railroads play an important part in crop values. 
Fresh and early vegetables and field crops secure the 
highest prices, and by use of the railroads the farmer's 
products reach an early market and are thus assured 
of a high and satisfactory price. 

Another important consideration is the a'd given 
the farmer by the State Government. Dangerous 
and contagious diseases among cattle, injurious in- 
sects, obnoxious pests of all kinds, and bad roads, are 
all under the supervision of competent commissions, ap- 
pointed by the State authorities. They are thus 
taken care of, with no extra expense or loss to the 
farmer. 

In conclusion let us sum up the salient points of 
our discussion. First : Massachusetts is the best 
state in which to locate, if the farmer possess only a 
moderate income. Secondly: Massachusetts leads in 
average amount and values per acre of the leading 
crops. Thirdly : Formable soil and climatic condi- 
tions, the superior intelligence of the farmers, benefi- 
cial railroad systems, and protection of agricultural 
interests by the state, make these conditions possible. 

With all this evidence in favor of Massachusetts 
why heed Horace Greeley when he says, " Go West, 
young man, go West ? " 



Reports are frequent that the new football rules, 
especially that which prohibits coaching from the 
side-lines, are being openly evaded by some of the 
leading college teams. Still more stringent regula- 
tions seem to be called for. 



Aggie, 18; W. P. I., 0. 

On Saturday, Nov. 10, Aggie defeated Worcester 
Tech. on the Worcester Oval. The day was cold 
and windy which caused a good deal of fumbling on 
the part of our men, but notwithstanding these facts 
our team played a snappy gam.e which our opponents 
were unable to check. At no time during the game 
were the Worcester men able to hold Aggie for 
downs, and only once did Aggie fail to hold Worces- 
ter. Although our men were slightly heavier they 
outplayed the Worcester men by their scientific team 
work. Halligan having a sprained ankle was unable 
to play but his place was well taken by Pierson, who 
played a good game both on the defensive and offen- 
sive. His running with the ball was exceptionally 
good. 

Belden filled Barry's place at right half, the latter 
being laid up with a bad knee. Belden rushed the 
ball well but his defensive v/ork was not quite so good. 

Lewis at fullback played a very good game both on 
the defensive and offensive. His long gains made 
through the line were one of the features of the game. 

Snell was once more in his old place at guard. 
Although his ankle was rather weak he played a very 
strong defensive game often breaking through and 
tackling the runner for a loss. 

The game opened with Aggie defending the east 
goal. Spencer kicked off to Whitman who fumbled, 
the ball rolling to our four yard line where O'Hearn 
fell on it. From here, by continual line plunges and 
end runs, Aggie carried the ball to Worcester's 20- 
yard line where the ball was fumbled and Worcester 
obtained possession of it, but was held for downs. With 
the ball once more in their possession Aggie soon scored 
her first touchdown. Cooke kicked goal. 

Spencer then kicked off to Cooke who brought the 
ball back to the 35-yard line. After exchanging 
hands several times on fumbles, Lewis of Aggie car- 
ried the ball over the line for our second touchdown. 
Cooke kicked goal. 

Spencer then kicked off to Lewis who carried the 
ball back about twenty yards. With the ball on Wor- 
cester's 10-yard line the first half ended. Score, 
12-0. 



54 



AGGIE LIFE. 



In the second half Cooke kicked off to Rylands who 
brought the ball back about fifteen yards. After sev- 
eral rushes, Worcester not being able to gain the re- 
quired distance, the ball went to Aggie. 

Aggie soon had the ball on Worcester's 5-yard line 
when Lewis carried over for our third and last touch- 
down. Cooke kicked goal. Spencer kicked off to 
Whitman who with careful dodging carried the ball 
through Worcester's team to center of field. After a 
few rushes time was called with the ball on Worces- 
ter's 15-yard line. The features of the game were 
the playing of O'Hearn, Bodfish and Lewis for Aggie, 
and Ryland and Spencer for Worcester. The sum- 
mary : 

AGGIE. w. p. T. 

O'Hearn, 1. e. r. e.. Norcross 

Pierson, 1. t. r. t., Walsh 

Snell, 1. g. r. g., Merriam 

Paul, c. c, Perkins 

Gamwell, r. g. 1. g., Philbrooks 

Cooke, r. t. 1. t., Bundage 

Bodfish, r. e. 1. e., Maynard 

Whitman, q. b. q. b., Spencer 

Chickering, 1. h. b. r. h. b.. Thrower 

Belden, r. h. b. r. h. b., Rylands 

Lewis, f. b. f. b., Schumann 
Score — Aggie, 18. Touchdowns — Lewis, 3. Goals from 
touchdowns — Cooke 3. Umpire — S. C. Willis, Worcester. 
Referee — V. A. Gates, M. A. C. Time — 15 and 10 minute 
halves. 

Aggie, ; Amherst, 18. 

Aggie closed her season last Saturday, playing Am- 
herst on Pratt Field. The field was a swamp, mak- 
ing fast play impossible and neither side could make 
long gains. Amherst had the advantage in weight, 
and a cool head on the side lines to run the plays. 
She played well but not fast ; her interference was 
very strong. 

Aggie played a fairly strong game part of the time 
but was very erratic. Her backs were slow in starting 
and in the first half seemed to be troubled with a bad 
attack of stage-fright. In the second half Aggie did 
better but was clearly out-played and out-generaled. 
Both sides did some costly fumbling. 

Aggie kicked off to Amherst's 35 -yard line, and 
Morse advanced five yards. After short gains and a 
fumble Amherst punted to Whitman. Aggie fumbled 
the first play and Amherst again worked the line for 
short gains. Amherst was caught offside and holding 



the ball and lost ten yards. Aggie could not gain but 
lost the ball on downs. Short gains were made through 
the line, Cooke being finally sent over for a touch- 
down. Phillips kicked the goal. 

Aggie kicked off to Amherst's 15-yard line. The ball 
was advanced fifteen yards. A series of line plays 
netted Amherst fifteen yards more and then she was 
forced to kick. Whitman received the kick and ad- 
vanced the ball five yards. Aggie could not gain and 
punted. Amherst made ten yards and was forced to 
punt, Aggie was unable to gain and returned the 
kick. Amherst took a brace and made several yards 
to be held for downs on Aggie's 12-yard line. 

Aggie worked Ballantine's end for fifteen yards with 
a double pass. She continued to make steady gains 
until about thirty yards had been covered when one of 
the backs fumbled. Amherst made steady gains only 
to lose the ball on Aggie's 1-yard line. Cooke fell 
back for a kick. Ballantine broke through and 
blocked getting the ball for a touchdown. Phillips 
kicked the goal. 

Aggie kicked lo Amherst who could not gain but 
kicked ; the half ended with the ball in Aggie's posses- 
sion at the center of the field. 

In the second half Aggie took a decided brace. 
Amherst kicked off to Whitman who advanced the 
ball ten yards. Gamwell was sent through the line 
for five yards. Barry, O'Hearn and Cooke advanced 
the ball, Amherst's fumbled and lost ten yards,bringing 
the ball on Amherst 35-yard line. O'Hearn tried a 
drop kick but failed. Amherst kicked to Whitman 
and several kicks were exchanged. Aggie pushed the 
ball to Amherst's 10-yard line only to lose it on downs. 
Amherst kicked, and aided by luck got the ball to 
Aggie's 10-yard line from which Shay went over 
for the third touchdown. Phillips kicked the goal. 

Aggie kicked off to Amherst who made repeated 
gains through the line now greatly weakened by the 
loss of Halligan and Snell. The game ended with 
the ball in the center of the field. 

For Aggie Barry played a star game while Cooke 
and O'Hearn also deserve mention. For Amherst 
Shay was easily the star, he and Cook making the 
most gains. The line -up. 



AGGIE. 

O'Hearn, 1. e. 
Halli|:an, Pi^rson, 1. t. 



AMHERST. 

1. e., Anderson 
1. t., Cook 



AGGIE LIFE. 



55 



Snell, Franklin, 1. g. 
Paul, c. 
Gamwell, r. g. 
Cooke, r. t. 
Bodfish, r. e. 
Whitman, q. b. 
Chickering, 1. h. b. 
Barry, r. h. b. 
Lewis, f. b. 



1. g., Varnum 

c, Howard 

r. g., Burke 

r. t., Morse 

s. e., Ballantine 

q. b., Daniels 

1. h. b.. Shay 

r. h. b., Wiggins 

f. b., Phillips 



Score — Amherst 18, Aggie 0. Touchdowns — Cook, Bal- 
lantme Shay. Goals — Phillips 3. Linesmen — Patrick, Amherst, 
Gates, Aggie. Referee— Newell of Harvard. Umpire — 
Berdsell of Harvard. Timekeeper — Wilson, Aggie. Time — 
25-minute halves. 



A MUSEUM. 

The simple exhibition of specimens is not the main 
purpose of a modern museum. Nowadays, the 
arrangement of a museum follows out a carefully 
designed plan ; not unlike that of a well-ordered refer- 
ence library, with each thing in its proper place. The 
arrangement may be compared to that of the mate- 
rials of a book which, in all but paper and cover, a 
museum really is ; and the comparison is more nearly 
true if the scope of the plan embraces but one depart- 
ment of scientific inquiry. Our larger museums, such 
as the Cambridge museum, may be appropriately 
compared with a composite natural science text-book, 
the different sub-titles and the texts under these titles 
being quite separate and distinct in themselves, and 
yet having that broad relationship which obtains in the 
whole domain of natural science. A further similar- 
ity between a book and a museum is to be seen in the 
object of each, which should be to furnish coherent 
information concerning that of which it treats. While 
a museum must often be incomplete with regard to 
details, and accordingly not well suited to furnish 
alone a complete education in what it illustrates, it, 
nevertheless, is an indispensable adjunct to scientific 
research and to teaching ; it is in substance the best 
possible means of illustrating the text of all scientific 
book-lore. 

Was it not the great French naturalist, Cuvier, of 
whom it was said that he was a famous naturalist 
before he left the museum for the field ? Indeed, the 
educational value of a natural history museum cannot 
be over-estimated. Its plan should be to give a 
connected history of the plant and animal life of our 
globe from the earliest ages to the present time in so 



far as material will permit ; its aim should be to illus- 
trate in the most effective way the succession, or at 
least, the relative importance and position, of the dif- 
ferent orders of life. A museum is then eminently 
suggestive. The visitor, having his attention properly 
directed at the start, can read for himself much that is 
illustrative of the history and progress of life upon our 
globe. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE M. A. C. FORENSIC 
CLUB. 

ARTICLE I. 

Sec. 1. This organization shall be known as the 
M. A. C. Forensic Club. 

Sec. 2. The object of this Club shall be to culti- 
vate the art of speaking in public. 

ARTICLE II. 

Sec. I. All members of the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural college in good and regular standing, who 
have completed one term's work in said institution.are 
eligible to membership in this Club. 

Sec. 2. Any person to become a member of this 
Club must receive a two-thirds vote of the members 
present at a regular meeting. 

Sec. 3. A person to become a member of this 
Club must pay the regular admission fee. 

ARTICLE III. 

Sec. 1. The officers of this Club shall be as fol- 
lows : a president, to be chosen from the senior class ; 
two vice-presidents, to be chosen from the junior and 
sophomore classes respectively ; and a secretary and 
treasurer. 

Sec. 2. Nominations for the officers of this Club 
shall be by informal ballot. 

Sec. 3. The duties of the president shall be to 
preside at all meetings. 

Sec. 4. The duty of the vice-presidents shall be 
to preside at meetings in the absence of the president. 

Sec. 5. The duties of the secretary and treasurer 
shall be to keep a faithful account of the proceedings 
of all meetings and post a notice of said meetings at 
least six hours before the time on which the meeting 
is to take place, to notify the members who are to 
serve on committees, and to collect all dues and pay 
all bills, 



56 



AGGIE LIFE. 



ARTICLE IV. 

The meetings of this organization shall be held 
every Wednesday evening, unless otherwise changed 
by a two-thirds vote of the members present at a pre- 
vious meeting. 

ARTICLE V. 

All amendments to this Constitution shall be sub- 
mitted in writing at a regular meeting at least one 
week before the time on which it is to be acted upon. 



^olle^f PotfS' 



— Sawin, 1904, has moved to No. 13 South Col- 
lege. 

— Proulx, 1903, is rooming with Tower in 12 South 
College. 

— Mr. Petit's dancing class meets to-night at 7-30 
in Grange Hall. 

— The pond froze Friday night and remained cov- 
ered with ice all day Saturday. 

— Our game with Worcester Tech, resulted in a 
score of 18-0 in favor of "Aggies." 

— Dr. W. E. Stone presented a paper at the New 
Haven convention of agricultural colleges. 

— The junior class will give some time to reading 
a Shakespearean drama with Prof. Mills. 

— The glee club is to take part in a concert, given 
by Mrs. Sanderson at North Amherst on December 
4th. 

— Both Monday's and Tuesday's drill hours were 
used for obtaining photographs of the battalion and 
band. 

— Mr. Dusten of Amherst college gave a very in- 
teresting talk before our Y. M. C. A. on Thursday 
evening. 

— The Seniors' hour with Capt. Anderson was can- 
celled on Friday that they might view the football 
practice. 

— Emery, '95, of Brown has assisted in training 
and coaching the football team during the last week's 
practice. 

— Professor Lull spoke to the class in Compara- 
tive Anatomy of Amherst college Monday on 
'• Dinosaurs." 



■ — Professor Babson has moved from his rooms 
over the bank to the house of Professor Richardson 
on Faculty St. 

— Thursday's drill was cancelled in order that the 
time might be used to advantage by the football eleven 
and second team. 

— The Natural History society visited the asbestos 
mine in Pelham on Saturday. The party was accom- 
panied by Profs. Smith and Howard. 

■ — Pres't Goodell spent the past week in New 
Haven attending the annual convention of American 
agricultural colleges and experiment stations. 

— Beginning Monday, Nov. 19th, the former hours 
for drill were resumed. Drill will now be at 3-30 on 
the afternoons of Monday, Tuesday and Thursday. 

—The freshmen played a lively game of football 
with South Hadley High school eleven on the cam- 
pus, Wednesday afternoon. The score was 11-0 in 
favor of the freshmen. 

— A football game which always creates much 
excitement is that of the freshmen and sophomore 
classes. For several years past the sophomore eleven 
has come off successful. 

— A presidential salute of 21 rounds was given 
on the common by the artillery squad the night fol- 
lowing election. A battallion was also formed which 
gave some rifle salutes. The cannon used was the 
steel, 3 inch field piece. 

— President Worstman and Professor Ladd, of the 
Chemical department of the North Dakota State col- 
lege, spent Friday in Amherst. They had come East 
to attend the annual convention of American agricul- 
tural colleges, held at New Haven last week. 

— Professor Babson gave an illustrated talk entitled 
" Europe " before the members of the Shakespearean 
club on Friday evening, Nov. 9th. The views thrown 
on the curtain were taken by Professor Babson with 
his own camera while on his trip through Europe. 

— The class of 1903 has elected the following men 
to act as a board of editors for the 1903 Index. They 
have the sympathy as well as the good wishes of the 
present board whose efforts are about to come forth. 
Editor-in-chief, Monahan ; business manager, Barrus ; 
assistant. Brooks ; artist, Tinker ; literary, Franklin 
and Jones ; statistics, Bacon and Snell. 



AGC 



L^.a 



57 



— Professor Woodward of the University of Cali- 
fornia spent two or three days of last week in Am- 
herst. He spoke on Friday afternoon before the 
members of the Entomological classes and others in- 
terested in Entomology on the subject of the " Vena- 
tion of Insect Wings." 

— The military department made preparations for 
a recitation on the campus at 8-15 the other morn- 
ing by placing the furniture, charts, etc., on the 
ground near the goal-posts. To everyone's disap- 
pointment, doctors included, the plans had to be 
changed for various reasons, and two worthy sopho- 
mores returned the things to their places. 

— The debate arranged for last Wednesday was 
necessarily postponed and will take place to-night. 
Subject, " Resolved, that the cut system of the Mas- 
sachusetts Agricultural College is a just system ; " H. 
M. Cheever, H. J. Franklin for the affirmative; F. W. 
Webster, M. H. West for the negative. The follow- 
ing debate has been arranged for Tuesday evening, 
Nov. 27th. Subject, " Resolved, that a single gold 
standard is for the best interests of the United States ; " 
N. D. Whitman, R. W. Morse for the affirmative ; 
J. Barry, H. L. Knight for the negative. 

— At a meeting of the debating club Friday even- 
ing a constitution, drafted by a committee appointed 
at a previous meeting, was presented and accepted. 
The constitution having been ratified by the members 
present, a permanent organization was formed by the 
election of the following-named officers : President, 
Thomas Casey ; vice presidents, R. W. Morse and 
M. H. West; secretary and treasurer, James H. 
Chickering. An executive committee consisting of 
T. Casey, C. E. Gordon, H. L. Knight, and M. H. 
West was appointed to draw up by-laws for the society 

— The Insectary has recently added to its equip- 
ment some new photographic apparatus. An enlarg- 
ing, reducing and copying camera with extension hood, 
and a Dallenger Rapid Rectilinear lens have been 
purchased for the photography of insects and their 
work, the enlarging power of the camera being greatly 
increased by the use of the hood. A Premo camera 
for field work is also a part of the equipment, and by 
its use the work of insects out of doors on a large 
scale may be photographed. The entire equipment 
in this line is as complete as can be found anywhere 



in connection with experiment stations and was pur- 
chased after a careful study of the uses to which it 
was to be put, and an examination of those in use for 
similar purposes elsewhere. 

— An interesting experiment soon to be undertaken 
at the Experiment Station will be the determination 
of the influence on plant growth of variation from the 
normal of the electric potential in the atmosphere. 
By maintaining, as far as is possible, uniform light, 
heat, and moisture conditions, and by eliminating all 
influences but that of electricity, it is hoped by means 
of a very sensitive electro meter to read the effects 
of electric potential on the growth of plants. Re- 
search along this particular line, the effect of elec- 
tric atmospheric potential, is quite new. Any new 
ideas will be valuable in view cf the widely prevailing 
effect of atmosphere on vegetable growth and the im- 
portance of unexplained plant life phenomena. The 
experiment will be conducted by Mr. Monahan, under 
the supervision of Dr. Stone. 



MEETING OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIA- 
TION OF AGRICULTURAL COLLEGES 
AND EXPERIMENT STATIONS. 

The fourteenth annual convention of this Associa- 
tion was held at New Haven, Conn., Tuesday, Wednes- 
day and Thursday of last week. Over a hundred and 
fifty delegates were present, coming from all parts of 
the country, the Mass. Agricultural college being rep- 
resented by President Goodell, and Profs. Stone, 
Brooks and H. T. Fernald. 

At the Tuesday morning session reports from the 
various committees and sections were given, that from 
the executive committee being of chief interest. In 
the reports from sections, the establishment of a chair 
of entomology at M. A. C. was highly commended as 
being a step in the right direction and most creditable 
to the college. 

Following these reports the association listened to 
the first ot a series of three lectures by Dr. Bernard 
Dyer of England, on Experimentation at Rothamp- 
stead, given in accordance with the provisions accom- 
panying the establishment of a fund for the purpose 
of sending a lecturer to this country to present the 
subject of Agricultural investigations in England to the 
association. 



58 



AGGIE LIFE. 



The afternoon was devoted to meetings nf the vari- 
ous sections. In entomology the subject of " Nursery 
Inspection" was discussed at length by delegates from 
all parts of the United States. In Botany and Horti- 
culture the relation of "Plant Physiology to Agriculture 
and Horticulture," and other topics were presented ; 
while in the section on Agriculture and Chemistry 
co-operation between stations and farmers was under 
consideration. 

In the evening the association assembled to hear 
the presidential address given by Dr. J. E. Stubbs of 
Nevada, on "Ethical Values Fundamental in the Ideas 
and Ideals of Modern Education, follov/ed"by the sec- 
ond Rothampstead lecture. Wednesday, by vote of 
the association, was spent at Middletown, this being 
the twenty-fifth anniversary of the establishment of 
Middletown experiment station — the first to be estab- 
lished in the United States. After a brief examina- 
tion of the buildings of Wesleyan University and in 
particular of the room in which the first experimental 
work was done and of the Respiration Calorimeter, the 
convention assembled in Memorial Chapel, where it 
was addressed by Dr. W. H. Jordan of Geneva, New 
York on the subject; "American Experiment Sta- 
tions," and by Dr. W. O. Atwater of Middletown, 
Conn., on the subject, " The Connecticut Experiment 
Station." This was followed by what was termed a 
lunch but which proved to be an excellent dinner, 
served in the Fayerweather Gymnasium. The after- 
noon was devoted to meetings of the various sections 
and to a most pleasant reception at the home of Prof. 
Atwater after which the delegates returned to New 
Haven in time for the evening session. This was 
occupied by general business and by an able memorial 
address on Senator Justin S. Morrill, by Pres. Geo. 
W. Atherton of the Pennsylvania state college. 

At the Thursday morning session after attending to 
committee reports, and miscellaneous business, the 
third Rothampstead lecture was given by Dr. Dyer. 
The afternoon was occupied by section meetings while 
at the evening session final reports of committees and 
the closing business of the convention consumed the 
time of the delegates. The convention was a great 
success, both in the attendance which was unusually 
large, and the quality of the papers and addresses. 

The following-named officers were elected for the 
ensuing year : President, Prof. A. W. Harris of 



Orono, Me.; vice-presidents. Prof. James H. Pater- 
son of Lexington, Ky., Prof. W.H.Jordan of Geneva, 
N. Y., Prof. L. G. Carpenter of Fort Collins. Col., 
and Prof. A. E. Bryan of Pullman, Wash.; executive 
committee. President H. H. Goodell of Massachu- 
setts agricultural college of Amherst, Presiden 
Joseph E. Strubbs, Nevada agricultural college, Reno, 
Nev., Prof. Alexis Cope of Ohio state college, Colum- 
bus, 0., Prof. George W. Atherton of state college, 
Pennsylvania, and Prof. H. C. White of Georgia 
state college, Athens, Ga.; bibliographer. Prof. A. C. 
True of Washington, D. C; secretary and treasurer. 
Prof. E. B. Voorhees of New Brunswick, N. J. 



n 



rcoile* 



John D. Rockefeller has given $100,000 to the 
psychological laboratory of Columbia University. 

A number of scientific lectures will be delivered 
during the winter months at the University of Penn- 
sylvania. 

The students and faculty of M. I. T. have come to 
an agreement by which cane rushing will be abolished 
at " Tech." 

The first Hebrew letter fraternity in the United 
States was recently organized at the Bible college of 
the University of Kentucky. 

The main building of Virginia college at Roanoke, 
Virginia, was recently burned to the ground. No 
lives were lost but there were many narrow escapes 
and the property loss is over $100,000. 

In order to defray the expenses of their college 
course, two students of Johns Hopkins and Baltimore 
medical recently stole four pounds of platinum valued 
at over $1200 from the Chemical laboratory of Johns 
Hopkins. 

An Interesting interclass contest at M. I. T. Is what 
is known as the cane spree. It is held on the day of 
the Sophomore-Freshmen football game and cane- 
rush. One man from each of the lower classes Is 
chosen for the light-weight, middle-weight, and heavy- 
vveight contests. The rival contestants then take hold 
of a cane and strive for five minutes to obtain sole 
possession of it. Where the men are evenly matched 
the contest is very exciting. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



59 



Brown has decided to restrict her electives in the 
future more than she has done in the past. Elec- 
tive courses rather than elective studies will hereafter 
be offered. This seems to be the prevailing tendency 
of educational institutions at present. 

The annual cane rush at the Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology had a sad ending, one of the Fresh- 
men being killed. The victim had played in the 
football game just before the rush and was in poor 
physical condition. The rush lasted fifteen minutes 
and at the end of that time, he was found dead. Two 
others were also seriously Injured. 

A counterpart of the historic E. Benjamin Andrews 
incident at Brown a few years ago occurred recently 
in the dismissal from Leland Stanford Jr. University 
of Dr. Ross, one of the oldest and most esteemed 
professors of the institution. The cause was a differ- 
ence of opinion over a political topic with Mrs. Stan- 
ford, whose course is being violently criticised all 
over the country as inimical to free speech. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

The library is now in possession of the histories of 
the following cities and towns of Massachusetts : 

Amherst, Woburn, Milford, Medford, Pelham, 
Worcester, Oxford, Salem, Hadley, Quincy and New 
Braintree, Tewksbury, Newbury, Sutton, Marlbor- 
ough, Dunstable, Lowell, Bradford, Newton, Natick, 
Essex, Fitchburg 2 volumes, Plymouth, Springfield, 
Pittsfield 2 volumes, Abington, Framingham, Great 
Barrington, Palmer, Spencer, Clinton, Worthington, 
Easthampton, Gardner, Medway, Rockport, Douglas, 
Leicester and Maiden. 

Besides these, which are strictly histories of towns 
and cities,there is a history of Western Massachusetts 
and accounts of anniversaries which some of the older 
towns have celebrated. The histories all date from 
the beginning of each town's existence but some have 
been written for quite a number of years. Owing to 
the fact that many different writers have been con- 
cerned in making up these books a great variety in 
style of writing is noticed. 

" The Naval Monument'' by A. Bowen, containing 
official and other accounts of all the battles fought 
between the navies of the United States and Great 
Britain during the Revolutionary War ; and also an 
account of the war with Algiers. This book was pub- 



lished in the year 1830 but since it has but lately been 
presented to the library and probably but very few 
people are familiar with it, this account may not be 
out of place. At the time of the publication of this 
book the recent war was fresh in everybody's memory 
and the world had as yet not ceased to wonder at the 
strength and bravery of the men who had won their 
freedom from Great Britain and established a nation 
which was destined to be second to none. The 
author has nothing but praise and admiration for our 
navy. The book contains illustrations of the most 
important naval battles of the war. 

"A National History of the British Lepidoptera" by 
J. W. Tutt. This is primarily a text-book for stu- 
dents and collectors and is published in two volumes. 
Although essentially a book on British Lepidoptera it 
ought to have an interest for other than purely British 
Lepidopterists. The descriptions of each super-family 
cover the whole fauna included in the super-family 
and thus should be of general use to all students of 
these families. The book is purely scientific and is 
well written ; the descriptions, although necessarily 
containing many technical words, are very clear. 

" The Fishes of North and Middle America," by 
David Starr Jordan and Barton Warren Evermann. 
Perhaps this may be more properly considered as a 
descriptive catalogue of the species of fish-like verte- 
brates found in the waters of North America, North 
of the Isthmus of Panama. It is in four volumes and 
issued in the form of a bulletin from the United 
States National Museum. Part I includes from 
Branchiostomathidae to Priacanthidae, Part II. Lutia- 
nidae to Cephalicanthidae. Part III, Callionymidae to 
Ogocephalidae and Part IV completes the catalogue. 
The book is thoroughly illustrated. 



Ivamna. 



The fifteenth annual banquet of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College Club of New York will take place 
at the Hotel St. Dennis, Broadway and 1 4th Sts., Fri- 
day evening, December 7th, at 6-30 o'clock. 

'71. — R. W. Lyman was in town recently. 

78. — President J. H. Washburne and Professor A. 
A. Brigham represented the Rhode Island State Col- 
lege at the New Haven convention. 



6o 



AGGIE LIFE. 



'81. — J. L. Hills, director of the Vermont Experi- 
ment station, attended the convention of American 
Agricultural colleges at New Haven. 

'82. — We are pleased to record the birth of a son 
to Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Kingman of Amherst. 

"83. — We take great pleasure in announcing that 
Chas. H. Preston has been elected to the Legislature 
from his district which is made up of three towns. 
We are much pleased by his success in the caucus 
which nominated him for this position, as he received 
within five of a majority of the total vote cast, not- 
withstanding the fact that there were two other candi- 
dates in the caucus. 

'88. — H. C. Bliss recently returned from a trip 
to California, stopping a few days in Amherst to visit 
friends at the College, and also at Northampton, before 
returning to his home in Attleboro. 

'89. — Director B. L. Hartwell of the Rhode Island 
Experiment station attended the convention of state 
colleges. 

Ex-'90. — November 7th John B. Maynard married 
to Miss Grace Bachelder of Boston ; at home 
after January 1st, 52 Falmouth St., Boston. 

'92. — We are pleased to announce that Francis G. 
Stockbridge is to be married on Nov. 22 to Miss May 
Elizabeth Morrison of Harrison, N. Y. 

'92. — E. B. Holland has gone as delegate to the 
conference of Economic Chemists held at Washing- 
ton. D. C. 

'94.— A. C. Curtis is master in English and History 
at St. Austin's school, West New Brighton, New 
York. 

'96.— Married Oct. 31, at Bearsville, N Y., Mr 
Newton Shultis to Miss Blanche Van de Bogert, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Van de Bogert. At 
home, after Dec. 15, at 71 Walnut St., Winchester, 
Mass. 

'96. — B. K. Jones has resigned his position as as- 
sistant chemist in the department of foods and feeding, 
Hatch Experiment station, to accept a similar position 
in the Utah Experiment station, Logan, Utah, 

'96. — H. C. Burrington was in town a short time 
ago and was much interested in seeing our football 
team defeat Storrs. 

'96. — A son has been born to Mr. and Mrs. H. H. 
Roper of South Manchester. 

'96.— E. W. Poole, Draftsman with Z. B. Davis, 



Mass 



P. O. 



Contractor and Builder, New Bedford, 
Box 129. 

'97.— At an Institute held at Wellsboro, Pa., Oct. 
29, — Nov. 2, Prof. Clayton F. Palmer of the Mans- 
field Normal School gave a talk on " Phases of 
Nature Study." 

'97. — C. A. Peters addressed the Chemical club of 
Yale University Nov. 10, upon his recent work en- 
titled " The Volumetric Estimation of Copper as the 
Oxalate, with Separations from Cadmium, Arsenic, 
Iron, Tin and Zinc." 

'99. — F, A. Merrill, tutor for instruction of "Tech." 
boys, St. Botolph St., Boston. 

'00. — F. G. Stanley's address is No. 39 Lanark 
Road, Brookiine, Mass., and not Chestnut Hill, Reser- 
voir, Newton, as published in last issue. 

Ex-'OO. — A. L. March was in town recently. 



L. C. Claflin, Editor-in-Chief. 
R. W. Morse, Business Manager. 

( i § 



(VOLUME XXXII) 
Published Annually by the Junior Class. 



To THE Public : — We wish to announce that the 
Year Book of the Class of 1902 is being compiled 
and that time, thought, work, and money are not 
being spared to make the XXXII Volume of the 
Index an accurate summary of the past college year 
and the mouthpiece of college thought and Sentiment ; 
as well as an ornament and a credit to our college. 

To interest in the 1902 Index ^.W who are interested 
in " Old Aggie " is the hope of 

The 1902 " Index " Board. 



15 



DRAWING AND BLUE PROCESS PAPERS, 

SCALES, ANGLES, CURVES aud T SQUARES, 

ARCHITECTS' AND DRAFTMEN'S COLORS, 

SCHOOL BOXES WATER COLORS, 



WiSWOHTH, PWLEND k GO., 



INCORPORATED, 

82 and 84 Washington St., \T.naTn'Nr 
216 and 218 Clarendon St., / ^^''^^^ 



Factories, MALDEN, MASS. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. XI. 



AMHERST. MASS., DECEMBER 19, 1900, 



NO. 



■ Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and AlumnXare requested to contributs. Communications should be addressed, Aggik Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will be sent 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears ar« paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

CLARENCE EVERETT GORDON, 1901, Editor-in-Chief. 
NATHAN DAVIS WHITMAN, 1901, Business Manager. 
LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, 1902, Assistant Business Manager. 

Assistant Editors. 

CHARLES LESLIE RICE, 1901. 
THOMAS CASEY, 1901. 
CHARLES MILTON KINNEY, 1902. 
CLIFFORD ALBION TINKER, 1903. 



JAMES HENRY CHICKERING, 1901 
HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT. 1902. 
ARTHUR LINCOLN DACY, 1902. 
NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN, 1903. 



Terms: fl.OO per year in adtsanc*. Siugl* Copies, 10c. Postage outside •* United States and Canada, 2Sc. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 
Foot-Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

G. R. Bridgeforth, Pres. Athl«tic Association, 
C. L. Rice, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

J. H. ChickeringSec. Nineteen Hundred and Two Index, 

Reading-Room, C. T. Leslie, Secretary. 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
C. L. Rice, Manager. 
R. W, Morse, Manager. 



Entered at th« Pest Office as second-class mail matttr. 



Cds-torlals. 



ANNOUNCEMENT, 

Believing that there is a general misunderstanding 
concerning the mission of our agricultural colleges, 
the editors of the Life have deemed it not inexpedient 
to publish a little information concerning the scope of 
study offered at the Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege. With this purpose in view this issue has been 
brought out, that those who have only a superficial 
knowledge of the college, may learn more about what 
the State is providing in the way of a broad and liberal 
education for her young men. We wish to acknowl- 
edge our indebtedness to the several departments for 
contributing information concerning the aim and 
scope of each. We solicit the attention of all those 
for whom this issue was designed, and trust that the 
plan may accomplish what the editors had in view. 



There is perhaps no further need to speak of the 



necessity for better provision for our athletic sports, 
The conditions which call for an enclosed field are 
still before us, and are well known to those from whom 
the students most expect assistance. It seems to us 
that now is a very opportune time to take up the 
matter and carry the whole plan through. The stu- 
dents are trying to do their part towards making such 
a field an absolute necessity. The greater the neces- 
sity. becom.es the greater should be the willingness to 
support a plan for meeting it. The conditions which 
call for an enclosed field, as it happens, are those 
which likewise reflect credit on the college; the neces- 
sity and the honor both result from our progress in 
athletics. It is true that a failure to make anything of 
athletics might be considered grounds for demanding 
some such provision as an enclosed field; for then it 
could probably be justly claimed that on account of the 
excessive tax and the difficulty in raising the neces- 
sary money it was impossible to do anything in athletic 
sports. This difficulty was encountered but was over- 
come; not without a great deal of inconvenience, how- 



62 



AGGIE LIFE 



ever, and we think it to the credit of the students 
and those who so liberally contributed to student enter- 
prises that the difficulty was overcome. But if the 
necessity for an athletic field is to be measured by our 
success or failure in athletic work it seems to us that, 
on the face of it, a petition made on the ground of our 
success is more to the point and more likely to insure 
substantial response than is a plea made on the 
ground that because we have such a difficult task in 
obtaining money we have not been able to do anything 
creditable. Therefore, it is because we have met 
with very creditable success in foot-ball during the 
last three years, and because one of our most success- 
ful seasons, considered as a whole, has just passed, 
that we wish to again bring this trite but most perti- 
nent subject to the attention of all those interested in 
athletics at M. A. C. With a proper enclosed athletic 
field it is more than probable that the college can 
accomplish more in baseball and track athletics than 
has been the case in the past. The conditions pre- 
vailing then and now are well known to all who have 
been willing to look the matter squarely in the face. 



AGRICULTURAL TRAINING AND A BROAD 
EDUCATION. 

THE COURSE OF STUDY AT THE MASSACHUSETTS 
AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

In Roman mythology we find that it was Ceres ^ 
sister of the king of the gods, who represented the art 
of husbandry. Is it not a significant fact in the light 
of the early Roman history that the goddess of the 
Roman mythology, who presided over agriculture, was 
sister of the great Jupiter, he who, from his throne 
on Mount Olympus, "the reputed seat eternal of the 
gods," summoned them to counsel? In addition to 
what mythology suggests as to the value placed upon 
agriculture by the early Romans, history teaches us 
that they loved the pursuit of agriculture, and that the 
noblest minds of the empire were attracted to the 
occupation of tilling the soil. Earlier even than the 
days when the Roman Empire flourished we find the 
occupation of agriculture taking a rank of first impor- 
tance in the yet more ancient civilization of Egypt 
and Babylonia; and in the centuries since the great 
Empire has ceased to be wherever we have seen or 
now see evidences of a prosperous and enlightened 
civilization, we find the pursuit of agriculture occupy- 



ing a high and honored place. The Sacacens and 
the Moors in Spain "carried the art to a height which 
perhaps has never been surpassed in Europe," and 
to-day over all Europe, the science is engaging the 
attention of the most progressive and enlightened men. 

The vast territory of the United States with its 
boundless resources offers an immense field for indus- 
trial enterprise, and year after year sees the science 
and practice of agriculture gaining in importance in 
this country. The extent of the land now under tillage 
and the large percentage of the population of the 
United States engaged in agricultural pursuits is very 
significant. The rapid strides made throughout the 
South and West, the importance and extent of agricul- 
tural enterprise in these great sections of our couj^.try, 
the vast resources still available and still untouched, 
and the great enterprises under discussion for making 
fertile the great arid belt of the western plains, all 
these and a hundred other striking facts stand witness 
to the present and growing needs of agriculture. 

Though we would fain think of Massachusetts as 
primarily a manufacturing state, we must concede 
that she holds an important place in agriculture. In 
Massachusetts there are not to be found the great 
resources which belong to the western states, but 
there has been a necessity to provide for a large and 
prosperous working population, such as one would 
naturally find in a large manufacturing state and this 
necessity has developed agricultural interests at home. 
As early as 1792, a society was formed in Massachu- 
setts.the object of which was to promote agricultural 
interests in the state. Since then the Agricultural 
College has been founded, agricultural societies have 
been organized, experiment stations have been estab- 
lished, and all possible means have been employed to 
meet the manifold problems that present themselves 
upon all sides as the needs of the times demand solu- 
tion of the them. 

Thus, scientific training in agriculture has become 
as important asthe same training in the mechanic arts, 
" Make your student a master-farmer, a master- 
mechanic; but make him a master-man," The farm- 
er of to-day cannot proceed along the same lines as 
the farmer of a century ago. Things have changed, 
and the new order demands trained men. The spirit 
of the age is a scientific one; it is a spirit of inquiry. 
Why should it not manifest itself in agriculture? How 



AGGIE LIFE. 



63 



to improve and benefit man's condition is the under- 
lying idea, and wherever this bold and progressive 
spirit makes its way, we see improvement follow. 
Bold and careful thinkers are daily engaged with prob- 
lems, the solution of which means a great deal to us 
in providing for our comfort and well-being, and in no 
branch of scientific research are there problems in- 
volving our well-being more important than those 
which confront him who would engage in one of the 
manifold branches of agriculture science. Can anyone 
point out a wider field for observation than that which 
is afforded in the study of the soil, the forest, the 
climate, or of animate nature, the birds, insects and 
animals. There is no wider field, nor one which 
calls for greater dicipline and training. 

To learn to observe and to observe accurately, to 
think and to think accurately, and to apply one's 
knowledge to the best advantage should be the earnest 
wish and aim of everyone who takes up a scientific 
calling or any calling. The time has come when the 
derived signification of the word agriculture must be 
heeded before its primary meaning; the mind must be 
cultivated and trained to observe, to think, and to 
reason before the cultivation of the soil is undertaken. 
It would be very desirable if the manual training could 
be acquired at the same time as the training of the 
mind — and it is presumed that the earnest student 
'vould secure that training as opportunity offered — but 
above all he should try to master the principles of the 
science, he should train his mind to guide his hand; 
in brief, he should try to become the "master-man," 
and to be a master is impossible except as careful 
thinking directs and guides. 

The time was very recent when the word agricul- 
ture had but one signification. A man who set out to 
get an agricultural training and to follow an agricul- 
tural calling intended to become a farmer. People 
believed that to be the end and aim of agricultural 
training. To a certain extent they were right in their 
belief. Primarily the agricultural schools had that 
grand and noble purpose in view ; but to-day the term 
agriculture has a great deal broader signification than 
it had a quarter of a century ago, and it is not too 
too much to say that by the majority of people, espec- 
ially those whose knowledge of the purpose and scope 
of agricultural education is only incidental, this wider 
signification is but little understood.if at all. It must, 



however, be obvious to any one who will give the mat- 
ter a little thought that at the present day no broad 
and comprehensive science can progress, except as 
the problems that are constantly springing up are care- 
fully investigated with a view to their solution. What 
must be the necessary result ? Various departments 
of research will be established and their importance 
must inevitably lead to specialization in each. It is 
in this way only that the most satisfactory progress 
can be made ; that the best results may be obtained. 
To illustrate we may cite the study of physics : its 
four great divisions are heat, light, sound, and electric- 
ity. In agriculture we find a very similar divivison 
into different departments of inquiry : Agriculture 
proper ; first and foremost, to which the other branches 
are subsidiary and essential ; horticulture, a general 
term for important occupations of market gardening, 
fruit culture, floriculture, landscape gardening, forestry, 
etc.; botany, which comprises plant physiology and 
pathology; e/7/omo/oj^7which treats of insects and their 
economic importance, an importance which is grow- 
ing every day ; zoology which furnishes a knowledge 
of animal life and structure and lays the foundation 
for veterinary training, so important to the farmer ; 
agricultural chemistry of first importance to the farmer 
teaching him how to conserve manures so commonly 
wasted, and how to properly feed his stock for their 
health and his profit; veterinary, instructing in the care 
of farm animals and in the prevention of disease. 

All these are departments in which there are oppor- 
tunities for endless investigation. Specialization is 
therefore absolutely necessary. But it is not only in 
research that the specialization is seen. There is a 
great demand for men trained as specialists in all 
these lines. Large numbers of men and women are 
yearly graduated for work in forestry. Landscape 
gardening is now an important profession. Agricul- 
tural chemists are taking highly renumerative positions 
all over the country in departments of experiment sta- 
tion work and the same is true of economic entomol- 
ogy, in which department there is also a demand for 
men to carry on the destruction of insect pests. Not 
only is there a need of and, a demand, for more 
veterinary training in the education of every farmer, 
but there is a growing imporiance in veterinary medi- 
cine as a profession. So too, in botany, rapid progress 
is being made in the study of plant diseases and their 



64 



AGGIE LIFE. 



remedies. General agricultural training in the man- 
agement of farm affairs is recognised as an absolute 
necessity to a successful farmer, and market-garden- 
ers, fruit-growers and greenhouse-owners are seeking 
to obtain the best possible training for their important 
work. 

Was not his a far-sighted vision which could pene- 
trate the obscurity of the future and make such a 
wise provision for these important agricultural interests 
of to-day. To the late Senator Justin A. Morrill of 
Vermont belongs the honor of founding the agricultural 
colleges of this great country and of raising a bulwark 
for our national strength and glory in every state of 
the Union. In 1864, in accordance with the provis- 
ion of the so-called Land-Grant Act of 1862, under 
the combined action of the State and Federal Gov- 
ernments, the Massachusetts Agricultural College was 
incorporated. In 1882, the Experiment Station was 
also incorporated and located at Amherst on the 
grounds of the Agricultural College. The work of 
both these institutions is going on to-day and both are 
enjoying a prosperity unprecedented in their history. 

The Massachusetts Agricultural College offers a free 
education to the young men of the State. It gives a 
four years' course leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science, and a graduate course leading to the 
degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philoso- 
phy. The course is designed to fit the young man for 
general farming, to train him to take up any of the 
many pursuits coming under the general name of 
horticulture, or to give a thorough training in chemis- 
try, botany, entomology, or veterinary. Advanced 
work is offered in all of these subjects, and also in 
mathematics and physics. Careful attention is paid 
to English rhetorical composition and to literature 
throughout the course. French and German are 
each required for one year, and are elective in the 
senior year. Mathematics and chemistry are required. 
A course in engineering is given in the sophomore 
year, and a course in physics, supplemented by labora- 
tory work, is required in the junior year. The v/ork in 
required chemistry consists in text-book and lecture 
work supplemented by laboratory practice. In the 
senior year students may elect political economy, 
history, geology, astronomy, or Latin. The needs of 
those who look forward to teaching are considered 
and met, while for those who desire a broad and lib- 



eral college education to fit for business and mercan- 
tile life a training of the best kind is offered in the 
study of subjects which are useful and practical as 
well as broadening and upbuilding. 



DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE. 

The aim of this department is to give to each and 
every student a fair knowledge of the business of 
horticulture in all its lines, including landscape garden- 
ing and also some of the fundamental principals of 
forestry as related to the methods of improving the 
conditions of the forests of Massachusetts or New Eng- 
land. This work is carried on during the sophomore 
and junior years. 

It is believed that every graduate of the college 
should have at least this knowledge whether he is to 
follow any line of. agriculture or horticulture or not. 
This institution was endowed and established for the 
specific purpose of educating the people who are 
engaged in the practice of agriculture in its various 
departments and the mechanic arts, and as one-third 
of the government endowment was assigned to the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology for the educa- 
tion of those engaged in the mechanic arts, it leaves 
the Massachusetts Agricultural College the one duty 
of educating those who are to engage in agriculture or 
horticulture. 

The standing and influence of any class of citizens 
depends upon the breadth of their education, which 
enables them first to practice successfully their own 
calling and second to understand and have sympathy 
for the conditions of those engaged in other occupa- 
tions. Should a student after completing his course 
here become a doctor, lawyer, merchant, manufacturer 
or a teacher in the public schools or higher institutions 
of the state or country, he would have some knowledge 
of and therefore some interest in the products of 
the people engaged in horticulture and could not be 
pointed out as a graduate of a special school and yet 
have no knowledge of one of the important interests 
for which that school was established. It is a natural 
tendency with most professonal men and those engaged 
in other callings than agriculture or horticulture to 
look forward to the time when they may enjoy the 
quiet pleasures of home life amid growing fruits, 
flowers or perhaps some of the larger agricultural 
interests ; and the elementary training of the student in 



AGGIE LIFE. 



65 



various lines of horticulture will help to foster this 
tendency. 

In the senior year the course in horticulture is 
intended to fit the student for the practice of 
fruit culture, market-gardening, floriculture, or land- 
scape-gardening. It is urged that every student who 
elects horticulture, should, while making some one of 
these subjects a specialty become more or less 
familiar with all lines of this subject and possibly some 
lines of agriculture, as the conditions under which both 
agriculture and horticulture are carried on in New 
England vary greatly, and our farm.s possess so many 
varying conditions that no one can tell into what side- 
issues one engaged in dairying or in fruit growing may 
not be drawn. 

It is important that those who have selected some 
line of horticulture for their life work become skilled 
in the practice of that work as soon as possible, and to 
this end all the important market garden crops are 
grown, to a limited extent, in the field and under glass; 
all the fruits, all out-door bedding or flowering plants, 
all plants for indoor decoration, and all trees, shrubs 
and plants for outside decoration of the home, the 
routine work of which can be seen by the students 
and be taken part in whenever time permits and the 
student may, if he will become considerably skilled in 
this routine work. 

The equipment for this work consists of about 75 
acres in the horticultural department proper, upon 
which is grown all the varieties of the large and small 
fruits in condition to illustrate all stages of growth from 
the seedlings to the full grown tree or plant, and in 
most cases in sufficent quantities to illustrate the 
market or commiercial side of this line of horticulture. 
For the study of landscape gardening, we have first of 
all an ideal location, being surrounded on all sides 
by the greatest wealth of natural beauty to be found 
anywhere in the country, and the grounds have been 
laid out into 2i farm-park, where the farm and garden 
portions are more or less intermingled, and while not 
carrying out the modern ideas of the natural system of 
landscape gardening, yet does produce that blending 
of beauty and utility that should surround all farm 
homes. 

The equipment for teaching floricutlure is one of 
the best connected with any agricultural college in 
the country, having sufficient space under glass \o 



illustrate the business of growing the most important 
cut-flower plants, house and out-door decorative plants, 
and also a very large and complete collection of eco- 
nomic plants, like coffee,bananna, India rubber, manilla 
hemp, sago, etc. The green-houses are of many 
forms and include as many methods of construction 
and of heating and ventilating appliances as possible. 
For the study of landscape gardening the large collec- 
tion of ornamental trees, shrubs and plants arranged 
in various places about the grounds affords a good 
opportunity for the student to become familiar with 
the materials used in ornamental planting and a large 
number of the graduates are now successfully engaged 
in this line of work, with a demand for more men than 
are qualified for the positions offered. The " short 
winter course " in horticulture is designed to give 
instruction to young men, who cannot afford to spend 
four years in study, in the practice of the lines of work 
they are engaged in or plan to take up in the future. 
The course is also adapted to those of some experi 
ence who wish to obtain a knowledge of the most 
modern and desirable methods, varieties, etc., as 
illustrated by the practice of the most progressive and 
successful fruit growers, market gardeners and florists. 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY. 

Great opportunities now await the young people in 
our schools. From practical industries, agricultural 
and other experiment stations, from colleges and 
technical institutions, comes an increasing demand for 
scientifically trained men and women. The work 
offered them is of great variety. It may be that of 
superintending an intricate scientific process on a 
large scale, of making a careful study of such a 
process with a view to its improvement, or, perhaps, 
of making an original investigation. In another case 
it will be the execution of chemical analyses, or the 
conducting of plant or animal experiments. It may 
be the work of teaching in the professor's, the author's, 
or thg editor's chair. All of this requires thorough 
training in Chemistry. 

It is easy to believe that the country which has the 
best chemists will be the most prosperous and the 
most powerful. It will have, at the lowest cost, the 
best food, the best manufactured articles, the fewest 
wastes and unutilized forms of matter, the best guns, 
the strongest explosives, the most resistant armor. 



66 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Its inhabitants will make the best use of their coun- 
try's resources ; they will be the most healthy, the 
most free from disease ; they will oppose the least re- 
sistance to favorable evolution ; they will be the most 
thrifty and the least dependent on other nations. Com- 
petition to-day between nations is essentially a compe- 
tition in the science and application of Chemistry. 

In beginning the study of Chemistry a young man 
often makes a choice between this and that kind of 
Chemistry. He starts with photographic, food, color 
or fertilizer Chemistry. Or it may be the distinction 
is dignified by such names as agricultural, medical or 
metallurgical Chemistry. Such a student must learn 
that there is only one Chemistry. There is only one 
good way in which to begin the study of Chemistry ; 
and that is to secure a solid foundation in general 
Chemistry. Then the special knowledge, indespensable 
for the man of advanced position, is readily acquired. 
Any day may bring to light a cheaper and quicker 
method for producing one of our manufactured staples ; 
new theories may require experimentation, or teach- 
ing from entirely new points of view. At such a 
crisis the thoroughly-trained and versatile chemist 
simply turns with ample equipment to the newly pre- 
sented front. The "photographic" chemist or his 
colleague must either turn back, and at great sacrifice 
bring up the neglected broad preparation, or, go under. 

It would be a mistake to suppose that the educa- 
tional force of chemistry is expended in producing 
chemists alone. An eminent national writer has said, 
" The education of its people in Chemistry and the 
phj'sical sciences is the most paying investment a 
country can make." But aside from training chemists 
and providing an important factor in all liberal courses 
of education, chemical study performs a special ser- 
vice for still other professions. Engineers, physicians 
and physiologists often find their success measured 
directly by the extent of their chemical training. 

Accurate observation, logical thinking, systematic 
and constant industry, are absolute requisites for the 
successful chemical student. And these are the fac- 
tors which make men of affairs, administrators of 
large interests and statesmen. A few names from the 
large number of men in high public service, who were 
first chemists by profession may be mentioned. Among 
presidents of universities and colleges are, Eliot of 
Harvard, Rogers and Crafts of the Massachusetts In- 



stitute of Technology, Drown of Lehigh, Morton of 
Stevens Institute, Dabney of Tennessee, Venable of 
North Carolina, Clark of our own institution; and, from 
our alumni, Washburn of Rhode Island and Stone 
of Purdue ; among statesmen. Senator Hill of Colo- 
rado, Lords, Prime Minister Salisbury, Playfair and 
Roscoe of England and J. B. Dumas and Berthelot of 
France. 

Courses adapted to the requirements mentioned, 
are offered at this college. Instruction is given in 
general and organic Chemistry, all kinds of analysis, 
including that of minerals and preparations. The 
needs of students, fitting for positions in experiment 
stations and those taking courses in entomology, 
botany and other biological subjects, medicine, veteri- 
nary science, dairy work and agriculture, receive spec- 
ial attention. Three teachers are thus occupied. 
Fourteen rooms, well adapted to their special uses, 
are supplied with all kinds of apparatus and chemical 
materials. Instruction is given by lectures, conversa- 
tions and laboratory exercises, with written and oral 
examinations. 

A Chemical club meets at stated times, usually in 
the evening, for discussion in a social way, of current 
topics of interest. This is attended by the students, 
members of the faculty and the officers and workers 
of the experiment station. The meetings are fre- 
quently addressed by interesting speakers on live sub- 
jects from practical life. They are a source of enthu- 
siasm highly valued by those who participate. 

Eight courses are now offered in Chemistry. Their 
time, aim and arrangement are briefly indicated in 
the following table : 

CHEMISTRY AT THE MASS. AGRIC. COLLEGE. 



Courses, 



TIME STATED IN HALF YEARS. 

B. S. M. S. Ph. D. Special 

Major Minor Major Minor Major Minor Agric. Dairy 

Freshman 1111 11 

Sophomore 2 2 2 2 2 2 

Junior 2 2 2 2 2 2 

Senior 2 2 2 

Graduate 4 2 6 3 



13 



1» 



1* 



Total 7 5 11 7 

*Every winter term. 
Considerable margin is allowed advanced students 
for the study of special subjects. More specific Infor- 
mation is freely furnished in answer to inquiries ad 
dressed to the department of Chemistry. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



67 



DEPARTMENT OF VETERINARY SCIENCE. 

According to the last census the total value of 
domestic animals and their products in the United 
States amounts to nearly two and one-half billions of 
dollars distributed as follows : 

Value of farm animals, $1,655,414,612 

Value of dairy products, 454,900,000 

Value of poultry and products, 343,000,000 

Total, $2,453,314,612 

In Massachusetts the value of farm animals is 

placed at $19,521,586 

Value of dairy products, 9,544,375 

Value of poultry products, 553,970 

Total. $29,619,931 

A conservative estimate gives an annual loss on 
this valuation of 6% due to the ravages of disease 
among live stock. By the intelligent application of 
the laws of animal hygiene a greater part of this loss 
is preventable. 

The figures given above show the relation of Veter- 
inary science to animal husbandry. With the rapid 
development of Veterinary medicine and bacteriology 
during the past twenty years we have added very 
greatly to our knowledge of the causes of contagious 
and other animal diseases. 

A knowledge of the action and habits of the micro- 
organisms producing this or that disease enables us 
frequently to prevent its action upon our animals. 

The principle aim of modern veterinary science is 
to prevent disease. This is accomplished by the 
more intelligent treatment of our animals, and also by 
the removal and destruction of the elements of conta- 
gion causing disease in them. 

The prevention of animal diseases is largely in the 
hands of those having the immediate care of the stock. 
The relation of the veterinarian to the one in charge 
is principally that of an advisor. He can direct but is 
not in position in the ordinary every day treatment of 
the animals to carry out the directions. The preven- 
tion rather than the care of disease should be the 
chief aim of all instruction in veterinary science given 
to agricultural students. 

The course given in M. A. C. at present may be 
outlined as follows : (a) the hygiene of farm animals ; 

(b) the anatomy and physiology of the bony, muscular, 
circulatory, respiratory, digestive and genital systems ; 

(c) a study of the more common pathological pro- 



cesses and the general causes, symptoms and effects 
of disease ; (d) the consideration of the specific dis- 
eases of the different organs, particularly as regards 
causes, effects and prevention ; (e) the nature, action 
and use of drugs ; (f) a microscopical study of the dis- 
ease producing micro-organi ms and animal parasites. 

While the course has been arranged principally to 
meet the requirements of the stock owner the interests 
of the prospective medical and veterinary students 
have not been ignored. 

With the new laboratory and hospital stable con- 
structed after the most modern plans, well equipped 
with apparatus for the study of disease, providing the 
best of sanitary conditions, and for the separation of 
diseased animals and thorough disinfection, the de- 
partment has unsurpassed faculties for giving instruc- 
tion in this important branch of agricultural science. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY. 

Every department of agricultural work is affected 
by the attacks of injurious insects, and losses from 
their ravages amount to millions of dollars each year 
in Massachusetts. In addition, many other industries 
suffer by their work, and the difference between 
profit and loss in the year is often decided by these 
small creatures. A conservative estimate of the 
annual loss caused by insects in the United States is 
three hundred million dollars, and with each year this 
sum increases. 

Such facts have led to the study of Entomology and 
particularly Economic Entomology, in order to under- 
stand the habits of the different insects and the best 
methods for preventing loss by their attacks. In this 
line of work the United States leads the world, and 
nowhere in the United States is the subject given 
more careful attention than at the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

It is noticeable that market gardeners, horticultur- 
ists, fruit growers, raisers of field crops, and in fact, 
those who are cultivating the soil in any line, reach 
the best results when they have a sufficient knowl- 
edge of insects to intelligently combat these foes, and 
in order to obtain this knowledge, the study of Ento- 
mology should be taken by everyone who intends to 
follow any one of the agricultural sciences. 

Recognizing the needs of such students much atten- 
tion is given to Entomology in the course at this College. 



68 



AGGIE LIFE. 



In the junior year the spring term is occupied by a study 
of insects themselves, their work and the ways in 
which they may be kept in check. But as insects 
compose five-sixths of all animals, and as their habits 
and lives differ widely, only the most elementary ideas 
on the subject can be presented within the time 
allotted. Accordingly a senior elective in the subject 
is also provided, and more thorough work is done 
along these lines. 

Here undergraduate work in Entomology ends, but 
the demand is so great for specialists to furnish infor- 
mation about insects to those who have been unable 
to obtain such courses themselves, that a three-years 
course, with Entomology as a major subject, and two 
selected minor subjects, has been established and has 
received the highest endorsements both in this coun- 
try and in Europe. The graduate from this course is 
a specialist and must be able to recognize insects and 
their work ; must be able to advise the most practical 
and practicable method of treatment to pursue in 
each case ; must meet and solve the new problems 
constantly arising in his work in such a manner as to 
produce satisfactory results ; and, in addition, he must 
have a good knowledge of how crops of all kinds are 
raised, of forestry and forest insects, of live stock and 
their parasites, and of every department of life where 
insects are a pest. Men thus fitted are few, and posi- 
tions are waiting for them in every part of the world, 
and to fit students for such places is the purpose of 
this graduate course. 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 

Considerable attention is paid to the study of Botany 
at the college, both in the regular course and as a 
special subject for advanced work. As a required 
subject in the freshman and sophomore years a gen- 
eral study is made of the nature, structure and classi- 
fication or naming of plants. Well equipped labora- 
tories are provided for this work, each student being 
furnished with microscopes and all the material and 
apparatus necessary for a thorough study of the sub- 
ject. To those having a taste for out-of-door wander- 
ings and the study of Nature, this course has special 
attractions as each student is required to make a 
collection of plants and several prizes are offered for 
such collections. 

For those students who wish to continue the subject 



further, several courses are provided as electives in 
the senior year, in which the more advanced branches 
of Botany are taken up, and beyond this are post- 
graduate courses for those who wish to still further 
specialize in the subject. The department is thoroughly 
equipped for all these courses and nothing is spared 
to make them as complete as possible. The exten- 
sive green-houses and grounds of the horticultural 
department, adjacent to the botanical building, are 
freely advailable, and the location of the college in 
one of the richest portions of the state as regards its 
flora is also a distinct advantage. 



DEPARMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 

The zoological instruction aims to cover, in as com- 
prehensive a manner as possible, a systematic and 
comparative view of the entire animal kingdom 
embracing both living and extinct forms, with the 
exception of the insects which, because of their vast 
numbers and economic importance, are treated in a 
separate science. 

In accordance with the plan of passing from the 
known to the unknown ; man himself is taken as the 
first type, and in the sophomore year, with Martin's 
" Advanced Human Body " as a guide, the student is 
led through a study of human anatomy, physiology, 
and hygeine. This study is illustrated by means of 
charts, manikins, models and such portions of domes- 
tic and other animals as are readily obtainable for 
comparison and demonstration. Occasional lectures 
serve to supplement the text-book. The aim is to 
teach the student to know and to appreciate to some 
extent the marvels of his own organization and to 
furnish a basis for further study. In the junior year 
the study of Zoology proper is taken up and the stu- 
dent becomes the investigator, for the principal work 
is done in the laboratory, the lectures serving only to 
supplement the knowledge acquired by observation. 
For future classes a text-book, Parker and Haswell's 
" Manual of Zoology," will be used with a full list of 
the best laboratory guides and other standard zoologi- 
cal works for constant reference. 

The wealth of microscopic life abounding in pools 
and streams near Amherst, and the close proximity to 
marine and inland supply depots, renders it possible to 
have as complete a list of forms for study as the time 
allotted to the work allows. First come the micro- 



AGGIE LIFE. 



69 



scopic forms, Amoeba and its allies, Englena and 
Volvox, and the slipper, trumpet, and bell animalcules, 
besides a host of less noted members of the same 
great group. Here the work is particularly fascinat- 
ing as one can observe, not alone form and structure, 
but the habits and activities of the inhabitants of, 
what is to the unaided eye, an unseen world. 

Then in the case of the higher forms an example of 
each principal class is dissected, drawn, studied and 
compared with others of its class with a view to know- 
ing the type and the variations caused by different 
environments and modes of life. Parallel with the 
anatomical will be the taxonomic or systematic work ; 
that is. the study of the forms with their classification 
and arrangement which are exhibited in the very com- 
plete museum collection, as well as by lantern pictures 
of existing animals and restorations of extinct ones, 
and by the growing collection of living animals of 
various sorts. 

Thus the student is brought to understand, by means 
of abundant illustration, the workings of those great 
laws which have governed the evolution of the various 
races ; the influence of environment ; the struggle for 
existence ; the probable causes of the extinction of 
great groups of other days, the probable future of exist- 
ing ones, and the relations existing between man and 
the rest of the animal kingdom. 

The value of this to the man is to teach him to 
use hand and eye, to appreciate and therefore the 
greater to enjoy animate nature, and to give him a 
knowledge of general zoology upon which to build the 
superstructure of advanced zoology or entomology, or 
the veterinary science. 



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

It is the aim to make the time devoted to the study 
of the subjects taught under the name of "agriculture" 
in this college, as fruitful as may be in the develop- 
ment of manhood and mental power. The course is 
not regarded as having industrial training alone for its 
object ; neither on the other hand, is it so planned as 
to give no help on the side of industrial training. 

Technical training alone : or, applying the principles 
under consideration directly to agriculture, instruction 
in the best methods of plowing, planting, reaping, feed- 
ing, etc. would more appropriately be taught in a 
farm school than In a college of agriculture. That 



such training is uncalled for is not believed. There is 
among us much slovenly farm work which should be 
bettered; but improved methods of work can better be 
taught either in a school of practice or upon the pri- 
vate farm than in connection with a college course. 
President Hadley of Yale has recently well said : 
" There are two ways of making a man a better worker 
in his profession : by technical training, which teaches 
him in his school days the things which otherwise 
he would have to learn afterwards ; and by scientific 
training, which teaches him in those same school days 
things which he would otherwise not learn at all. The 
former aims to save the time of the student, the latter 
to increase his opportunities of ultimate development." 

It is profoundly believed that the agricultural train- 
ing in college should be directed chiefly to the attain- 
ment of the second of these objects. 

While, however, this side of our work receives the 
greater emphasis, much help it is believed is given on 
the technical side as well, through the discussion and 
study of the principles upon which the accomplish- 
ment of the objects in view in the various farm oper- 
ations depends. 

With a knowledge of these principles or with a 
mind fitted by training to look for principles and always 
to work with these uppermost, one soon learns the 
"technique " of farm operations ; can adapt oneself to 
the ever varying conditions of practical experience ; 
and, best of all, may hopefully look for progress in 
methods. Not how to plow, how to drain, to irrigate, 
to manure ; but why we do these things is it important 
for the college man to learn. 

This being the animating principle it was decided 
some years since, and it is believed rightly decided, 
that the compulsory work which was a feature of the 
training here in the earlier years should be given up. 
Training in the methods of the various farm opera- 
tions is, however, still given when desired ; it is in short 
elective. There has been a feeling, doubtless, in 
some quarters, that this change would react unfavor- 
ably ; that a lesser proportion of our graduates would 
engage in agriculture or agricultural pursuits be- 
cause of it. Investigation does not sustain this view. 
Of the living members of the first ten classes gradu- 
ated 35.2% are engaged in agriculture or pursuits 
directly connected therewith; of the last ten (1889- 
'98) the percentage similarly engaged is 49.3. Of 



70 



AGGIE LIFE. 



the living members of the first five classes the per- 
centage in these pursuits is 46.2 ; in the last five it is 
62.4. Education work pertaining to Agriculture, Ex- 
periment Station work, fertilizer business and veteri- 
nary science are included. Out of 142 men living in 
the first ten classes 32 are on farms or gardens ; of 
209 men in the last ten classes (1889-'98) 65 are so 
found ; of 65 living members of the first five classes 
19 are engaged directly in agriculture ; of the 93 men 
in the classes '94 to '98, 37 are so engaged. 

A candid study of these statements, which are 
founded upon the latest available information, must 
convince that, far from its being true that we now 
educate away from the farm more than formerly, we 
are returning an increasing proportion of men to the 
farm. 

The training in agriculture now given here is, then, 
largely theoretical and developmental ; and is as yet 
carried on chiefly by means of lectures and text-book 
study. At the same time the application of correct 
theory in practice is constantly and largely illustrated 
by reference to field, to barns and stables, and to ex- 
periments in progress. 

The work of the first three years is required, and 
includes a study of the breeds of stock, stock breeding, 
stock feeding, and dairying. The history of agricul- 
ture and its relation to national and world prosperity 
are studied. Soils, and the various operations there- 
on including tillage, liming, drainage and irrigation are 
taken up. Manures and fertilizers and their use are 
fully studied. 

An effort is made in senior year to adapt the work 
to the individual needs of the students taking agricul- 
ture as an elective. All such students, however, are 
expected to study the various crops of the farm, cli- 
mate and atmosphere in their relations to crop and 
animal production, ensilage, dairying and farm man- 
agement. 

Those intending to engage in farming, whether as 
principals or superintendents, are expected to devote 
much time to observations of the actual farm opera- 
tions carried on here. 

The carrying through of some experiment is urged 
upon those hoping to take up experiment station work, 
and such men make a special study of experiment 
station literature and methods of experiment. 

Those intending to engage in educational work con. 



nected with agriculture pay particular attention to the 
literature of the subject. Laboratory methods will be 
more largely employed both in the required and elec- 
tive studies so soon as a hot-house and suitable rooms 
and appliances are available. 

In conclusion attention is called to the fact that the 
chances for fortune and usefulness upon the farm and 
in pursuits connected with the farm were never 
greater ; as is abundantly shown by the numerous in- 
stances of conspicuous success in both directions ; and 
by the increasing call for men educated in such lines 
as are here taught. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH. 

The aim of the English department in the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College is to train the students 
to a correct and effective use of the English language 
in the oral and written expression of thought ; to 
secure some acquaintance with the masterpieces of 
American and English literature; to develop ability 
to present logically and forcibly, oral and written 
arguments or propositions assigned for debate. As 
means to these ends rhetoric, literature, argumenta- 
tion and oratory are studied. 

The course in rhetoric comprises a study of the 
choice of words, the theory of phraseology, special 
objects in style, the sentence, the paragraph, the 
whole composition in its plan, arrangement and devel- 
opment. This is followed by lectures on invention, 
in which the elements and underlying principles of 
literature are discussed. The students are expected 
to give practical illustration of the principles taught 
in written exercises, themes and compositions that 
are required throughout the course. 

In the study of American and English literature 
text-books on the history of these literatures are used, 
but these text-books are not allowed to take the place 
that belongs to the literatures themselves. The stu- 
dent approaches English literature through American 
literature. Having learned to appreciate and to enjoy 
the literature of his own country he anticipates with 
pleasure some familiarity with the wider field of the 
literature of England. Throughout the course in lit- 
erature an attempt is made to know authors through 
their writings rather than through what others have 
written about their writings. As an important aid to 
an appreciation of literature the English language is 



AGGIE LIFE. 



71 



studied in its origin, structure and development, while 
the principles of literary criticism are found in the 
masterpieces of standard authors. 

Instruction in oratory is given through exercises in 
declamation, first before the instructor and then before 
the class. In the junior year at least three orations 
upon subjects assigned by the instructor or chosen by 
the student are written and delivered before the class. 

A course in argumentation is a required exercise 
during the senior year. The principles of the subject 
are studied in text-books and in the work of eminent 
debaters, while the practical illustration and use of 
these principles are secured by written briefs and 
forensics, and by oral debate. 

While the studies briefly outlined above are 
acknowledged by experienced educators to be of 
great value they will not necessarily produce " good 
writers " and " good speakers," nor will they always 
be crowned with a rich harvest of liberal culture. 
There can be no " good " writing without clear think- 
ing and in our desire for effective expression of thought 
we must not lose sight of thought itself. It cannot 
have escaped the notice of those acquainted with col- 
lege students that the thoughtful, earnest ones of their 
number are an unquestioned minority. For this con- 
dition of things the students are not wholly responsi- 
ble. Too often the hour of recitation or lecture 
passes without any such quickening of the student's 
interest or attention as shall lead to thoughtful consid- 
eration of truths involved in the subject in hand or 
suggested by it, Fortunate is that teacher of English 
who can improve the opportunity which is his to help 
his students to an intelligent appreciation of the treas- 
ures of thought and imagination that literature 
contains. 



DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE. 

I. Political enonomy. Care is taken first to train 
the beginner in the fundamental principles of the sci- 
ence by means of a test book supplemented with 
lectures. The student is taught to observe facts and 
from them derive those principles and laws which 
underlie and govern the production, destribution ex- 
change and consumption of wealth. The terms used 
are carefully defined and distinguished. Theories 
are scrutinized and arguments are weighed. 

The economic history of England and of America is 



then studied so that the theories, laws principles of the 
science may be discerned and studied in their actual 
application to the practical business of daily life. An 
appeal is made to the experience of the generations of 
men working in the midst of the advancing centuries. 

One object kept steadily in view is to interest the 
student in the current economic questions of the day, 
fit him to understand the discussion of them and at 
length enable him to form an opinion of his own regard- 
ingt hem, so that he may wisely adjust himself and his 
posessions to the constant developments of the busi- 
ness world. This object is further promoted by requir- 
ing of each student a written paper giving the results 
of his own investigation of some practical problem, 
which paper he is to read and defend before the class. 
In connection with this investigation, cour.ses of lec- 
tures are offered upon trusts, the currency, economics 
of agriculture, banks and banking, the labor question 
and other topics of current interest. 

II. Constitutional history. The later part of the 
year is spent in the study of constitutional history. 

Preparatory work is done, as may be necessary, in 
the review of our political institutions. The nature of 
our government, federal, state and municipal is ex- 
plained, and the relations of these three kinds of gov- 
ernment set forth. The actual working of political 
parties and conventions is described. Then our own 
government is compared and contrasted with the gov- 
ernments of England, France and Germany. 

The history of our written and unwritten constitu- 
tions is studied as time permits. The origin and 
development of the federal constitution are set forth 
as related to state constitutions and as connected with 
the constitution of England. 

Five hours per week are given to the work of this 
department during the year. The object kept con- 
stantly in view is to make the good citizen and the 
successful man of business; the means employed is a 
thorough understanding, thorough observation and 
thought of the environment constituted by the eco- 
nomic and political world. 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS. 

In a recent paper, under the caption, " Why Study 
Mathematics?" the author makes the following state- 
ment : " For genuine achievement the mind has need 
of more than the untrained coming and going of ideas 



72 



AGGIE LIFE 



* * * Whatever of sympathy and instinctive 
tact and of other unreasoned processes the mind may 
need in facing actual life, it also needs as much skill 
as it can possibly acquire in consciously directed 
thinking ; that is, in appreciating and utilizing clear 
conceptions ; and, however much other branches of 
study may entertain and inform and develop, mathe- 
matics is of all studies the best fitted by its nature to 
train the mind in thinking clearly and straight to the 
point." 

These sentiments voice the belief of the instructors 
of the Mathematical Department, and every subject 
handled, from the first term of the freshman year to 
the completion of the elective work, is presented with 
a view to reaching this much desired end. 

Aside from the question of mental development, 
there are plainly evident the utilitarian ends of the 
subjects taught. The mathematics for the under- 
classmen are of direct value to the student who may 
adopt teaching as his profession, and it is intended to 
give as extensive a research as possible in the allotted 
time. They also form the necessary basis for the 
work of this department in the upper classes, and 
the embryo engineer or physicist realizes that thorough 
preparation in his first years is essential to success, 
when confronted by the more profound problems that 
the advanced work brings. 

" A little knowledge is a dangerous thing," in these 
days when scientific research probes so deeply into 
the secrets of Nature. As a graduate student, if not 
earlier in his career, the man who would specialize 
learns how extended a general education is needed as 
a foundation for the superstructure he would rear. 

The botanist working along advanced lines of veg- 
etable pathology and physiology finds with each year 
an increasing need for exact knowledge of the princi- 
ples underlying the subjects of heat, light and electric- 
ity. In this fact he finds an answer to his under- 
graduate question — Of what value is Physics to me 
if I am to devote myself to Botany ? 

To the horticulturist, who combines with his knowl- 
edge of horticulture a practical education in the prin- 
ciples of engineering, is given an immense advantage, 
financially, over the man not so equipped. For land- 
scape engineering is a comparatively new field and 
the horticulturist working along this line may find 
competition less severe. 



Toward these ends the department is working, adding 
when it is possible to the laboratory and field equipment 
so that although only an adjunct, the Mathematical 
Department may keep its place as a necessary factor 
in equipping the graduate of the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College for successful competition in the 
world " outside college walls." 



DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGES. 

If all scientific research were carried on by English- 
speaking peoples, or if all scientific publications were 
written in the English language, there would be no 
necessity for our scientists to study the languages of 
the nations. But some of the greatest discoveries in 
modern science have been made by those who speak 
a different language from our own. For the thorough 
and painstaking student who wishes to acquaint him- 
self with the best thought of the many eminent French 
and German writers, or who wishes to keep abreast of 
the times in a knowledge of the periodical literature 
dealing with his specialty, a knowledge of French and 
German is quite necessary. To meet the require- 
ments of these advanced students of science or of the 
scientific investigator of other Belles lettres than our 
own is the principal aim of instruction in French and 
German. The establishment of an undergraduate 
course anticipates a good deal from this point of view, 
but it is necessary to begin early in order to secure 
the most satisfactory results, as considerable time is 
necessary for an adequate mastery of a working knowl- 
edge in any foreign language. Students who have had 
drill in French and German in the high school are 
enabled to make considerable progress in the year 
allotted to the work in college. Those desiring to pur- 
sue their study further may elect French and German 
in the senior year. 

The undergraduate work in French is required in 
the freshman year. A knowledge of the elements of 
grammar, such as the fundamental principles of con- 
struction and an acquaintance with regular and irreg- 
ular verbs and their conjugations, is insisted upon. 
Translation is begun early and is given especial atten- 
tion so that the student may acquire a vocabulary as 
soon as possible. In the sophomore year the student 
takes up German. The plan of study is similar to that 
of the French in the freshman year, especial attention 
being given to translation. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



73 



To best meet the needs of the advanced student, 
and to best fit him to carry on investigation in any de- 
partment of scientific inquiry where a knowledge of 
French and German is necessary, or helpful, is con- 
stantly kept fn view while at the same time the value 
of these two studies as mental drill and discipline and 
as auxiliaries to inquiry in the departments of French 
and German literature is not lost sight of. 



OBJECT OF MILITARY INSTRUCTION IN 
COLLEGES. 

This is a subject only partially understood by many 
and not understood at all by some. By those who 
fully understand it, it is considered a wise precaution- 
ary measure on the part of the general government 
to have young men in college trained in the Elementary 
Science of War even if not so well instructed in those 
higher branches that fit one for the responsible duties 
of command. It is expected that in case of any 
military emergency, the graduates of these institutions 
would prove a valuable factor in our national defense 
and security. The value of such instruction was 
exemplified in the recent war with Spain. The 
Report of the Inspector General for 1898 says : " The 
presidents of 46 colleges, whose military departments 
numbered about 7,100 students before hostilities 
began, reported that 29 of their military students and 
59 alumni had been commissioned in the Regular 
Army, and 157 students and 296 alumni in the Vol- 
unteer Army, a total of 541 officers, or enough for 
about 12 regiments ; and that 1,084 students and ex- 
students had joined the forces as noncommissioned 
officers or privates." 

The political conditions of continental Europe make 
military service there compulsory. Ten per cent of 
the whole population of France is enrolled on the 
army list, active and reserve; in Germany 6 1-2 per 
cent. In the U. S. there is less than one soldier, 
regular and volunteer, to every thousand of the popu- 
lation. In the U. S. military service is voluntary; for 
this reason many of our good, loyal citizens fail to 
recognize the fact that they owe any military duty to 
the government. Many estimate national strength 
by the standard of numbers ; their estimate is that if 
we have a population of 75,000,000 we can put 
7,000,000 soldiers in the field and are therefore, 
bound to whip a country with a population of 60,000,000, 
that can not put over 5,000,000 soldiers in the field. 



The fallacy of this proportion of war strength to num- 
bers was demonstrated by our civil war, the war with 
Spain and, more recently, the triumphant march of 
the allied forces upon the capital city of China. 

Ability to handle the rifle and use it effectively, disci- 
pline, and an unconquerable e5;pr//afecor/?5 has brought 
our army to the high standard it maintains to-day. 
Training in military schools and colleges is sup- 
posed to furnish military training without 
service in the regular army. It has a good 
influence upon the physical, moral and social charac- 
ter of the student besides inculcating a military spirit, 
and the lesson of discipline, without which a military 
organization is but a military mob. By the uniform 
he wears, by the instruction and drill he receives he 
is brought into closer relations with the government 
and recognizes more clearly his duty to serve it in 
time of need, and to defend the honor of it. Those 
who have worn the uniform, who have faced dangers 
and suffered privations in the service have a deeper 
love of country, a greater reverence for the flag and 
stand ready to risk life itself for the protection of the 
one and the honor of the other. 

The first detail of an army officer as Military 
Instructor in a college was in St. John's College, 
Annapolis, Md. in 1826. The next was at the Nor- 
wich University of Vermont in 1834, and one at the 
South Carolina Military Academy in 1842, but the 
government failed to realize the value of military 
instruction until lessons of the civil war demonstrated 
the necessity of having well trained officers to com- 
mand troops. There were not at that time, nor at 
the present time, is there a sufficient number of grad- 
uates of West Point to fill vacancies in the army. 

Several acts of congress have been passed since 
1862 appropriating money and public land, or scrip in 
lieu thereof, for the support of the Agricultural colleges. 
There are now 42 Agricultural colleges which derive 
financial beneft from these several acts of congress, 
to which army officers are detailed, these colleges 
derive an annual income of $1,491,489, or an average 
of $35,511 each. These acts of congress make mil- 
itary instruction, under a regular army officer, com- 
pulsory. To further encourage military instruction the 
general government furnishes arms and equipments, 
the president of the college giving bond to secure the 
government against loss or damage of any of this 
property. 



74 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Military Science embraces problems that find prac- 
tical solution upon the field of battle where the highest 
talent, courage and judgment are demanded. Wars 
have raged since the first dawn of civilization and 
seem likely to continue until the dawn of the millen- 
ium. Until that blessedtime shall arrive military training 
will be necessary, after that " Swords will be beaten 
into plow shares and spears into pruning hooks." 



ELECTIVE COURSES FOR SENIORS. 

1. 2. 



Agriculture, 
Political Economy. 
Veterinary. 


Agriculture, 

Chemistry. 

German. 


3. 




4. 


Botany, 

Chemistry, 

Veterinary. 




Horticulture, 
Entomology, 
Agriculture. 


5. 




6. 


Chemistry, 
Astronomy, 
Horticulture 


Geology, 


Entomology, 

Botany. 

German. 


7. 




8. 


Political Economy, 

English, 

History. 


Mathematics, 
Engineering, 
Political Economy 


9. 

Veterinary, 
Chemistry. 
German. 


11. 

Botany, 

Horticulture, 

English. 


English, '\ 

Latin, 

Mathematics. 



THE LIBRARY. 

The library of the Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege is one of which the college may well be proud. 
Of the kind it is second to none in the United States 
and it is mainly through the efforts of the president of 
the college that it has come to hold such an exalted 
position among scientific libraries. The works are 
divided into ten classes as follows: General works, 
131 vols.; Philosophy, 143 vols.; Religion, 234 vols.; 



Sociology, 2179 vols.; Philology, 60 vol.; Natural Sci- 
ences, 7874 vols; Useful Arts, 8049 vols; Fine Arts, 
160, vols.; Literature, 1392 vols.; History, 1417 vols; 
making a total of twenty one thousand six hundred and 
thirty nine volumes. Of the separate subjects, Gen- 
eral Agriculture with 3438 volumes has the largest 
number, Botany comes next with 2108 volumes. On 
the subject of Entomology there are 1257 volumes 
and en Political Economy 620 volumes. From these 
figures it will be seen that the library is well equipped 
for thorough investigation in most every branch of 
study. 

Connected with the library is a reading room which 
has on its tables the scientific papers and magazines 
of the day. Literary periodicals and newspapers are 
found in the students' reading room. The library is 
not alone for the use of the students and officers of 
the college, but anyone desiring to use it for reference, 
can do so, and may draw books. 



THE WORK OF OUR ALUMNI. 

Perhaps there is no better way in which to estimate 
the rank of a college than to consider the measure 
of success attained by its graduates. In 'the words of 
the old proverb, " By their fruits shall ye know them"; 
and surely the fruits of a college are the alumni that 
go forth from within her walls. If these men, who 
have tested for four years the things that she has had 
to offer, find themselves but imperfectly fitted for their 
life-work, then the college is not doing its duty, and 
cannot expect to long retain popular favor. But if, 
on the other hand, the great mass of the alumni show 
themselves well-trained and efficient along their 
chosen lines, then the college need have little fear of 
its future. 

There are now about five hundred living alumni of 
this college, everyone of them who is in good health 
has some definite vocation. There are no idlers. 
The occupations selected, however, are along widely 
different lines. So far as could be learned they are 
at the present time about as follows : 

In business, 

Farmers, 

Teachers, 

Physicians 

Experiment Station workers, 



78 
70 
56 
29 
28 



AGGIE LIFE. 



75 



Farm and Park Superintendents, 27 

Graduate Students, 25 

Civil Engineers, 23 

Chemists, 23 

Clerks, Bookkeepers, etc., 23 

Veterinary Surgeons, 14 

Journalists, 13 

Lawyers, 12 

Manufacturers, 12 

Market Gardeners, 9 

Florists, 9 

Mechanics, 9 

Electricians and Electric Engineers, 6 

Entomologists, 6 

Dentists, 6 

Architects, 4 

Clergymen, 3 

College Presidents, 2 

A study of this table reveals many things of interest. 
To begin with, there seems to be an erroneous impres- 
sion among the people at large that the only occupation 
open to the graduates of this college is farming. This 
is doubtless due to the the somewhat misleading name 
of the college and it is to be feared that this impression 
has kept many would-be students away in the past. Yet 
the table shows that not twenty per cent of the grad- 
uates ever choose agriculture as their life-work, and 
in recent years tne proportion has been even less. As 
the table indicates it is business pursuits that attract 
the largest number of our graduates. The same is 
probably true in every other college in New England. 
The time is coming when a business man must have 
a college education in order to succeed, and the more 
far-sighted men of to-day are preparing for it by 
sending their sons to college. 

Farming, however, stands a close second on the 
list. In this too a college education is essential under 
modern conditions. Exceptionally good courses in 
Agriculture are offered here for those who desire them, 
and those of our men who have taken them up, prob- 
ably rank as a body among the most progressive 
farmers of the state. 

The large proportion who have taken up teaching is 
highly significant, especially when we learn that at least 
forty out of the fifty-six are teaching in colleges and 
universities of the first rank. Harvard, Yale, Colum- 



bia, McGill and Purdue are among the universities 
which have drawn upon us. Two, moreover, of our 
men, have risen to the presidency of their respective 
Institutions. Rhode Island State College has had for 
years as its president Dr. J. H. Washburn, 78; and 
Purdue, one of the leading universities of the Middle 
West has within a short time called to be its head. 
Dr. W, E. Stone, '82. There can be but few more 
responsible and influential positions than the head of a 
large and growing university ; and we, as undergrad- 
uates must take pride in the fact that our college was 
thus honored. 

Twenty-nine men have entered upon the practice 
of medicine and fourteen more have chosen the allied 
science of veterinary surgery. This is sufficient evi- 
dence in itself that the old claim that the scientific 
institutions could not fit for the learned professions is 
unfounded. The fact seems to be that no better place 
exists than the Massachusetts Agricultural College for 
the obtaining of the firm groundwork of a broad and 
liberal education, preparatory to erecting the super- 
structure of medicine and kindred professions. 

Twenty-eight men are entered upon the rolls of the 
Experiment Stations of our own and other states. 
These stations were established principally for the pur- 
pose of scientific research, and the success of our 
graduates in this work testifies to the soundness of 
our scientific training. 

No fewer than twenty-five men are now studying for 
advanced degrees. Many of them are in the various 
medical and veterinary schools, for which our curric- 
ulum seems to afford especially good preparation. 
Others are seeking the degrees of Ph. D. and M. S., 
many of them here at this college. It is coming to 
be recognized more and more that the facilities for 
graduate work along scientific lines are exceptionally 
good at this college, and graduates of other colleges 
are taking advantage of this fact. In certain branches, 
notably botany and entomology, the courses offered 
are said to be unsurpassed by any college in America. 

The number of civil, mechanical and electrical 
engineers calls attention to the mathematical depart- 
ment. Perhaps this department more than any other 
is apt to be underestimated by those not familiar with 
the workings of the college. While its purpose is 
admittedly secondary to the purely scientific subjects, 
thorough instruction is provided and those who have 



76 



AGGIE LIFE. 



gone into the work are meeting with good success. 
The same may be said of those who have taken up 
chemistry, entomology, market-gardening and floricul- 
ture, all of which are ably represented. In entomol- 
ogy, an especially high standard has been reached, 
several of our graduates having been selected for 
responsible positions abroad as well as at home. 

The law has claimed twelve men. Of these two 
are now instructors in Yale and Columbia, another is 
a district attorney and a fourth, a registrar of deeds. 
Comparatively little attention has been paid to politics, 
but besides the positions already noted, there is a gov- 
ernor and a member of the House of Lords of Japan, 
the treasurer of the city of Lowell, and at least one 
member of the present state legislature. 

Perhaps the last position in which one would expect 
to find our alumni is that of the ministry ,yet we find even 
here no fewer than three upon our list. 

In conclusion, then, we may say that while, such is 
the irony of Fate, we are unable to point to a single 
graduate of international reputation, we yet have the 
double satisfaction of feeling that no person need hes- 
itate to enter this college from a fear that the training 
afforded is insufficient, and that our alumni wherever 
they may be found are doing creditable work for them- 
selves and for their Alma Mater. 



CHEMICAL CLUB. 

The next meeting will be held Monday evening, 
Jan. 7, 1901, at 7-30 p. m. sharp in the Chemical lec- 
ture room. 

The first part will consist of a talk on the life of 
Kekule by Professor Howard and the exhibition of 
portraits of distinguished chemists. 

The second part will be conducted as usual. 

E. B. Holland, President, 
S. W. Wiley, Secretary. 



ADDITIONS TO MUSEUM. 

GIFTS FOR MENAGERIE. 

Blake and Kinney, '02, one small brown snake each. 

W. E. Burnham, Greenfield, Flat-head Adder. 

Dr. Loomis, Amherst, 2 southern " Fence Lizards." 

Plant House, 4 Gold-fish. 

D. W. West, 3 Salamaders (red backed.) 



Also: 2 Spotted Salamanders; numerous minnows 
(young chub, etc.); 1 Pointed Turtle (purchased); 
2 Banded Rattlesnakes (Crotalus horridus) from 
Portland, Conn., (purchased); 2 Green Lizards 
(Anolis); 1 German " Fence Lizard" (Sacerta); 
2 large salamanders (Amblytonia); crayfish. 

GIFTS FOR MUSEUM. 

Mr. Wallace, " Postaxe-eel " (out of hydrant). 

Mr. Parmenter, Nematode worm (out of hydrant.) 

J. B. Henry, '01, Osprey. 

P. F. Felch, '00, 2 Pine Grosbeaks. 3 Cedar birds. 

W. R. Pierson, '01, 1 Regal moth, 1 Catocala moth. 

A. C. Wilson, '01, Heron. 

E. L. Macomber, 01, Heron. 

J. M. Ovalle, '01, Redstart. 

J. Barry, '01, striped snake. 

R. H. Vaughan, Worcester, Saw-whet o^l. 

W. E. Burnham, Greenfield, 1 Flat-head Adder. 

C. E. Stacy, Gloucester, young Bald Eagle. 

PURCHASES. 

Skeleton of Salamander; Termite or White Ant, all'' 
stages ; Leaf insect (Orthoptera, Phosmidas); Ear- 
wigs (Orthoptera forficulidas); Ant Lions (Neu- 
roptera); Sphenodon Hatteria ; baby Sea Turtle ; 
Deplopod (Myriopoda); also pictures, mainly 
restorations. 



A REVIEW OF THE FOOTBALL SEASON. 

The season of 1900, while it is not marked as an 
eminently victorious one, stands as a proof of the devel- 
opment of football in the College. This season we 
have played a schedule of ten games, all with colleges 
except the single Prep, school, Worcester academy. 
We have come out of the season with five victories 
and five defeats. We have scored 107 points against 
our opponents' 80 points. When we consider that 
these games were with teams representing colleges, 
having four or five times our number of students, and 
when we understand that nearly all these games were 
played away from home, our men playing on unknown 
ground after a tiresome ride, we must concede that our 
team did remarkably well. Besides the development 
of the 'varsity the college has maintained a scrub 
eleven, sending that team to play games also, so 



AGGIE LIFE. 



77 



that there are already experienced players to fill the 
vacant places on the 'varsity. 

On the opening day of the term Capt. Cooke called 
for candidates and aided by Halligan, '00, started a 
brisk practice. He found nine veteran men and 
plenty of new material. There were the guards, one 
tackle, one end, two half-backs, one quarter and the 
center to depend on while a full-back, an end and a 
tackle were wanting, There were among the candi- 
dates several ends and line men, but no experienced 
backs. After much experimenting Lewis, '04, was 
put in the position of full-back,while Halligan, '03,filled 
tackle. At end there was a good deal of rivalry, dur- 
ing the first two weeks Kelliher, Dellea and Pierce 
tried for the position with Lewis ; but on the return 
of McCobb the place was given to him. 

The first game of the season was with Holy Cross 
on Sept. 22d, and Coach Murphy strained every nerve 
to get the team into winning form. The men were 
drilled on plays and formation, handling kicks and 
tackling until they seemed in fine trim, physically. 
They met the Holy Cross players in Worcester giving 
them a heated argument, but were defeated by a sin- 
gle touchdown and goal. The reason for defeat was 
not so much the strength of our opponents as a slight 
attack of stage fright, owing to the lack of confidence. 

Soon after the Holy Cross game Mr. Murphy was 
forced to leave us so that we were practically without 
coaching the remainder of the season. On Sept. 29, 
Worcester academy met us on our own field, being 
defeated 12 to 0. This game proved to us that our 
team was developing defensive play owing to the good 
work of our scrub. 

On Oct. 6, Norwich was defeated in a one-sided 
contest. The team becoming much more confident 
and capable of truly fast ball, Snell was proving a 
strong man on defense and offense. Lewis was 
mastering his position and the whole team seemed 
to be working together as they failed to do in the latter 
part of the season. We met Wesleyan in a crippled 
condition, Lewis being out of the game and Bodfish 
playing full, but managed to hold them down to a de- 
cent score. In the few days following the Wesleyan 
game a sort of do or die spirit seemed to take pos- 
session of the men so that we met Williams on her 
own field in a way that cheered our supporters. In 
fact at this time the team was at its best never reach- 



ing such a point of excellence later in the season. 
One set-back was due principally to an injury to Snell 
which practically put him out of the game for the 
season. 

The game following Williams was Trinity and in 
this game was our slump. Too much censure can- 
not be laid to the management for this falling off as 
it was the folly of trying to play three games as hard 
as these in so short a time that without doubt ac- 
counted for the slump of the team. Trinity de- 
feated us by a large score and the fact that Trinity did 
not act as gentlemen should did not seem to take away 
the sting. The confidence of the team was gone and 
with it the team work that did so much against Wil- 
liams. It is not the purpose of this paper to have you 
think that the team was useless after the game with 
Trinity, for one week later it won from Vermont after 
traveling two hundred miles over Vermont railroads ; 
but the fact remains that the defeat at Hartford did 
much to defeat us in the more important game with 
Amherst. The team was then weakened, it is true, 
by injuries, but a little coaching at the right time 
would have brought back the confidence and victory. 
As we were unable to keep a coach our team grew 
worse instead of better, and although we defeated 
Storrs, and ran up a score of 18 points on Worcester 
Tech ; when we were put to a test on Pratt Field, 
lack of team work was apparent. To be sure the 
ground was a swamp familiar to our opponents and 
luck stood against us, but back of both of these and 
accounting for one touchdown at least was the team 
work and headwork of our opponets. This last defeat 
while it made us blue at the time, should serve as a 
stimulus to the team next season. The scoring of the 
season was as follows : 

TOUCHDOWNS. GOALS FROM TOUCHDOWNS. 

Chickering 5, Lewis 5 Barry 9 

Snell 3, Bodfish 1 Cooke 3 

Cooke 1, Halligan 1 goals from the field. 

Whitman 1, Barry 1 Cooke 1 

WEIGHT OF THE MEN. 

Cooke, 170 lbs. Paul, 150 lbs. 

Chickering, 145 lbs. O'Hearn, 165 lbs. 

Barry, 150 lbs. MacCobb, 140 lbs. 

Bodfish, 160 lbs. Lewis, 170 lbs. 

Whitman. 150 lbs. Halligan. 170 lbs. 

Gamwell, 185 lbs, Dellea, 140 lbs. 

Snell, 190 lbs. Kelliher, 140 lbs. 
Average weight, 158 lbs. 



78 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Colle^? I^ot^rs- 



— Tinker. 1903, has left college. 

— The cold snap has afforded several days of excel- 
lent skating. 

— The sophomore foot-ball team ^vas photographed 
Friday afternoon 

• — Pres. Goodell spent the past week in Washington 
on business for the college. 

— Allen, 1903, has been elected artist of the class 
Index to fill the place of Tinker. 

Prof. Babson delivered an address before the Chi 

Psi fraternity on Friday evening. 

The Freshman class has elected for polo captain 

C. H. Griffin and for basket-ball captain H. M. White. 

— Dr. Walker spent several days last week attend- 
ing the Convention of the State Grange at Worcester, 
of which he is the Chaplain. 

— The 'varsity foot-ball officers for next fall are: 
H. A. Paul captain, V. A. Gates, business manager, 
and P. W. Brooks,assistant business manager. 

— Professors Paige and Maynard attended the meet 
ing of the State Board of Agriculture at Worcester last 
week. Prof. Paige gave an address before that body, 

— At a recent meeting of the sophomore class the 
following officers were elected: W. E. Allen polo cap- 
tain, J. G. Cook, basket-ball captain, P. W. Brooks, 
base-ball captain. 

— The Boarding Club has elected the following offi- 
cers: Gamwell, pres. and 1st. director, Leslie vice 
pres. and 2nd. director, Chickering secretary and 3rd. 
director, Morse, Hall, Robinson and Gay the remain- 
ing directors. 

— The two upper classes have elected four men 
each to manage the Junior Prom. The men chosen 
are as follows: of the seniors. Rice, Whitman, Leslie 
and Chickering; of the junior?, Claflin, Kinney. Gates 
and Paul. This is the chief social event of the winter 
term and no effort will be spared to make it a success. 

— The Ehtomologisf s Monthly Magazine, ■^\xh\\s\\edi in 
London and recognized as the leading authority on 
entomologicar^subjects.pays a very substantial tribute 



to the entomological course offered here, and to Dr. 
H. T. Fernald, by printing in its issue for this month 
an outline, " as a sample of thoroughness of a course 
in entomology, and especially its economic side as 
taught in one of the principal Agricultral colleges of 
the United States." 



THE FORENSIC CLUB. 



The lively interest which has been manifested at 
the meetings of the Forensic Club affords those who 
undertook the movement considerable encourage- 
ment. Four interesting debates have been held with 
a fair attendance at each, and in every case with a 
good deal of animated discussion. With the opening 
of the winter term the work of the club will be con- 
tinued along the same lines, and it is hoped that more 
men will signify their' intention of joining the society 
and of lending their help towards advancing the work 
of the club. An increase in the active membership 
will greatly help on the work. The following debates 
have been held since the club was organized : 

November 21st., subject, " Resolved that the "cut 
system" of the Massachusetts Agricultural college is a 
just system." Barry, 190 Land Franklin, 1902, for the 
affirmative; Henry, 1901, and M. H. West, 1903, for 
the negative. The affirmative won both on the merits 
of the argument and on the merits of the question. 

November 27th, subject, " Resolved, that a gold 
standard is for the best interests of the United States." 
Whitman and Casey, 1901, for the affirmative; Barry, 
1 90 1 , and Knight, 1 902, for the negative. The affirm- 
ative won both on the merits of the argument and on 
the merits of the question. 

December 5th, subject, " Resolved, that the gov- 
ernment should own and operate the coal mines." 
Gordon and Bridgeforth, 1091 , for the affirmative; 
Henry and Casey 1901, for the negative. The nega- 
tive won on the merits of the question, the affirmative 
on the merits of the argument. 

December 12th,subject,-' Resolved, That the govern- 
ment should own and operate all natural monopolies." 
Chickering, 1901. and D. N. West, 1902, for the 
arfirmative ; Rice and Todd, 1901, for the negative. 
The vote on both the merits of the question and the 
merits of the argument resulted in favor of the 
negative. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



79 



THE NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY. 

A TRIP TO THE ASBESTOS MINE AT WEST PELHAM. 

Very seldom is a college man urged to give less 
time and energy to his college work. When such is 
the case, the best remedy would usually be not less 
study but more out-door exercise. 

Foot-ball men, tennis players and golfers rarely 
over-study but there is a large number of students who 
do not get sufficent physical development to give the 
sound body for the sound mind. The universal ex- 
cuse, and a conscientious one, is that studies crowd 
out the open air exercise. 

The Natural History Society of the college, recently 
reorganized, has for one of its objects excursions 
which shall be so instructive that the student shall 
not consider the time ill-spent and at the same time 
shall be given a walk which will tend to place body 
and mind in a better condition for the work which he 
has awaiting him on his return. 

The recent trip to the asbestos mine at West Pel- 
ham was made with this two-fold purpose in view. 
The weather was ideal and the frosty morning air 
made one literally feel the blood course through his 
whole being. As the ascent was made the Berkshires 
loomed up more and more in the West, Mount Grey- 
lock, easily the peer of them all, raising its snow- 
capped summit 2300 feet above sea-level. Mount 
Toby and Sugar-loaf on the North and Holyoke and 
Tom to the South completed a panorama not soon to 
be forgotten. 

Familiar as we are with the almost daily use of 
asbestos it is very interesting to see the raw material 
in situ. Several hundred tons have been removed 
from the mine for use in paint and paper, but at 
present it is not worked. It is possible, however, to 
see the asbestos in the condition in which it is most 
valuable, although not in very great quantities. Impure 
asbestos may be seen in abundance and a closely 
related mineral known as anthophyllite which may 
have been derived from olivine, also found in the 
mine. Biotite, mica and tourmaline may be found 
readily magnetite, opatite and nodules of corundum 
are known to have been formed here. This mine is 
in the "Monson gneiss" section of Professor Emerson 
and so it is not surprising that on the journey back 
to Amherst many samples of the so-called "Pelham 
Granite" were found. North of the West Pelham 



church there were indications of drumlins in which 
something of the structure could be seen. 

The few who made the expedition felt well repaid 
for their exertion and it Is hoped that the same trip 
may be taken later by those who were unable to 
accompany the party. 



PORTRAITS. 

During the past week the Chemical Department 
has been presented with a collection of portraits of 
noted chemists. They are elegantly framed and are 
enlargements of actual photographs. The pictures, 
including frames, are 24 by 30 inches in size, and, 
when hung in the halls and lecture room of the labora- 
tory, will serve not only to adorn the walls but to inspire 
the students with higher ideals and give them incentives 
to work. The educational value of continually com- 
ing in contact with the faces of men who have been 
the founders of a science or who are now advancing it 
is beyond estimating. The first group includes Pro- 
fessors Wohler of Gottingen, Chevreul of Paris, Kolbe 
of Leipzig, Kekule of Bonn, and V. Meyer of Zurich, 
Gottingen, and Heidelberg, none of whom are living. 
Of the long list of workers in chemistry to-day the fol- 
lowing are some of the most famous both because of 
work accomplished and also for that in which they are 
now actively engaged: Professors Baeyer of Murrich, 
Hempel of Dresden. Liebermann and Landolt of Berlin 
van't Hoff of Amsterdam and Berlin, Tolens of, 
Gottingen, and Emil Fischer of Wiirzburg and Berlin. 
Ail of these, twelve in number, will soon be seen on 
the walls of the Chemical Laboratory. 



umni 



'88. — Prof. F. S. Cooley has returned from a visit 
to Chicago where he attended the International Stock 
show. The Professor has contributed to the progress 
of the Century series a very interesting paper on the 
" Progress of Agriculture in America." 

'89. — C. S. Crocker of the Darling Fertilizer Co., 
Pawtucket, R. I., spent a few days in town recently in 
the interest of his company. 

•90.— F. O. Williams and M. H. Williams, '92, 
have formed a company to supply Sunderland and the 
surrounding towns with water under the name of the 
Sunderland Water Company. 

'91. — Born, Aug. 3d, a daughter to Mr, and Mrs. 
W. A. Brown of Springfield, Mass. 



8o 



AGGIE LIFE. 



'91. — The announcements of the marriage of C. H. 
Johnson to Miss Louise Cox of Dorchester, Mass., 
are now out. 

'92. — F. G. Stockbridge was married to May Eliza- 
beth Morrison of Rye Beach avenue, Harrison, N. Y., 
Nov. 22. Mr. Stockbridge spent a few days in town 
recently. 

'93. — L. W. Smith of Monteno, 111., has shown 
himself a very able farmer, having made a record in 
the rye crop last season, producing 405 bushels of 
cleaned rye on eight acres. 

'94. — Dr. E. T. Dickinson of Northampton spent 
Thanksgiving-day with friends in Amherst. 

'94. — C. H. Spaulding of Harvard has leased his 
farm to F. H. Brown. 

'95. — E. A. White, formerly of the Baron de Herst 
School, will occupy the position of assistant professor 
of Horticulture at the Agricultural College and assist- 
ant Horticulturalist in the Experiment Station. 

'95. — Wright A. Root of Northampton spent a few 
days in town recently. 

'96. — Albin M. Kramer, draughtsman, with Eastern 
Bridge and Structural Co., Worcester, Mass. Address, 
58 Front Street. 

'96. — F. H. Read has resigned his position in the 
Woonsocket High School to accept a more lucrative 
position in the English High School in Providence. 
The following editorial appeared in a recent issue 
of the Woonsocket, (R. I.) Evening Call: "We 
regret to hear that Mr. F. H. Read, teacher of com- 
mercial branches at the Woonsocket High School, is 
going to leave us. He is one of the ablest instructors 
ever employed in this city and the loss will be severely 
felt. The Providence High School, to which he goes, 
has secured in him a distinct and valuable acquisition. 
The change from Woonsocket to Providence will af- 
ford a larger field of opportunity and one which he 
fully merits." Also from a Woonsocket daily: " Not 
only the High School, but the city of Woonsocket is 
thus to lose the services of a valuable and efficient 
teacher. Mr. Read came to this city from New 
York, where he had been a teacher in a business col- 
lege, his branch being bookkeeping. This is his third 
year of service in this city and his loss will be keenly 
felt by all, and especially the High School pupils with 
whom he was quite popular." 



'96. — F. E. DeLuce spent a few days in town 
recently. 

'98. — C. G. Clark has accepted a position in South 
Deerfield. 

'98. — W. S. Fisher spent Thanksgiving-day in 
Amherst. 

'98. — We have been informed that A. G. Adjemian 
has not returned to Turkey as published in a recent 
issue. His present address we do not know. 

99. — H. E- Maynard spent the Thanksgiving vaca- 
tion at his home in Amherst. 

'00. — G.F. Parmenter is now acting as assistant in 
the department of Foods and Feeding, Hatch Experi- 
ment Station. 

'00. — F. H. Brown has leased a fruit farm in Har- 
vard' Mass., which he will occupy Jan. 1. 1901. 



L. C. Claflin, Editor-in-Chief. 
R. W. Morse, Business Manager. 

"^ i i I 



(VOLUME XXXII) 
Published Annually by the Junior Class. 



To THE Public : — We wish to announce that the 
Year Book of the Class of 1902 is being compiled 
and that time, thought, work, and money are not 
being spared to make the XXXII Volume of the 
Index an accurate summary of the past college year 
and the mouthpiece of college thought and sentiment ; 
as well as an ornament and a credit to our college. 

To interest in the 1902 Index slW who are interested 
in " Old Aggie " is the hope of 

The 1902 " Index " Board. 



DRAWING AND BLUE PROCESS PAPERS, 

SCALES, ANGLP:S, curves and T SQUARES, 

ARCHITECTS' AND DRAFTMEN'S COLORS, 

SCHOOL BOXES WATER COLORS, 



WHDSWOHTIi, PWLIIi & CO., 

INCORPORATED, 
82 and 8i Washington St., l-nnQTmsr 
216 and 218 Clarendon St., f^^^^^^^- 
Factories, MALDEN, MASS. 




VOL. XI. 



AMHERST, MASS.. JANUARY 16, 1901. 



NO. 7 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed, Aggik Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will be sent 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

CLARENCE EVERETT GORDON, 1901, Editor-in-Chief. 
NATHAN DAVIS WHITMAN, 1901, Business Manager. 
LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, 1902, Assistant Business Manager 

Assistant Editors. 

CHARLES LESLIE RICE, 1901. 
THOMAS CASEY, 1901. 
CHARLES MILTON KINNEY, 1902. 
CLIFFORD ALBION TINKER, 1903. 



JAMES HENRY CHICKERING, 1901. 
HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT, 1902. 
ARTHUR LINCOLN DACY, 1902. 
NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN, 1903. 



Terms: $1.00 per year in adcance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside ofi United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 
Foot-Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

G. R. Bridgeforth, Pres. .^Lthletic Association, 
C. L. Rice, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

J. H. ChickeringSec. Nineteen Hundred and Two Index, 

Reading-Room, C. T. LesHe, Secretary. 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
C. L. Rice, Manager. 
R. W, Morse, Manager. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



Edi'torials. 



The editors expected to publish in this issue a re- 
port of the banquet of the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College Club of New York.held in New York Clty,De- 
cember 7th,1900,but were disappointed in not receiving 
the report which had been arranged for. They re- 
gret that no account of the dinner can be given in this 
number. 



We are interested to note that an appropriation of 
money to paint the College buildings has been 
asked for. The buildings are certainly in need of re- 
pairs and we are sure that a thorough painting would 
greatly add to the attractiveness of the buildings and 
the grounds. Another clause which is of great inter- 
est to the undergraduates is that providing for bathing 
facilities in our gymnasium. This is something for 
which we have now waited a long time ; it is that 
without which the Drill Hall has been notably incom- 



plete for gymnasium work and indoor track athletics. 



We learn that the management of the Track Team 
is ready to adopt some plan for arranging an interclass 
athletic meet in the Drill Hall. If some plan is to be 
arranged it would seem best to take some action re- 
garding it very soon, that the meet may come off be- 
fore the track is torn up for the Military Ball. If suf- 
ficient enthusiasm is shown the plan may be carried 
through with very little trouble, as most of those who 
will enter as contestants will probably have had suf- 
ficient training in what regular track work they had 
previously been doing. A meeting will probably be 
held in the near future to decide upon what may be 
done. Those who are interested are requested to be 
thinking the matter over. 



The appropriation bill now before the Legislature 
contains a clause which is of especial interest to all 
members of the College. It asks, among other 
things, for money for a new boarding-house. Those 



82 



AGGIE LIFE. 



who have interested themselves in the matter have 
our deepest gratitude. Our hearty thanks and best 
wishes go with President Goodell in his efforts in be- 
half of this bill. For a long time a new dining-hall, 
with modern facilities, has been a vision for certain 
artists of the fanciful who dared to look ahead to the 
time when " brrghter worlds " should unfold. The 
first grey light of the dawn of this happy time seems 
really to be here and all of us must rejoice that it is 
so. The creation of fancy is assuming substantial 
form ; we may look about us and say truly, "It is 
good." 



The division of the College year into semesters in- 
stead of terms has brought about some changes 
which we think are very desirable from the students 
point of view. The College year has been shortened, 
two weeks having been taken from it and added to 
the long summer vacation, which according to the 
new arrangement will extend to the latter part of 
September. The old plan of opening the fall term at 
the beginning of the month proved very inconvenient 
to many students, particularly those who depended 
upon what they could earn during the summer vaca- 
tion to pay college expenses. It was principally be- 
cause of the students that the change was made, and 
we think that the new arrangement will prova quite 
satisfactory. The principal change in recess periods 
is in the spring vacation which has been shortened to 
a few days. The vacation at Christmas, the time on 
the whole most satisfactory for the longest recess, re- 
mains as formerly. The fall semester closes Febru- 
ary 5th, and the spring semester begins February 6th 
The time of commencement remains unchanged. The 
new system goes into operation at the beginning of 
the next college year ; college exercises for the re- 
mainder of this College year will follow out the old 
plan. In addition to whatever convenience may ac- 
crue to the students because of the new arrangement, 
it is thought that the plan will afford a much more 
satisfactory basis for arranging the studies than was 
possible under the old. We trust that it may prove 
so and that any change in courses, or their arrange- 
ment, may be such as shall strengthen under-class- 
man work in anticipation of more advanced work in 
the junior and senior years. 



FACES IN THE FIRE. 

(Competitive.) 

It was a cold wintry night. Outside the tiny snow 
flakes were falling fast and the wind whistled among 
the naked trees. Inside the great chunks of wood 
burned brightly in the fire place and everything 
seemed cheery and comfortable. 

Before the fire sat a white haired man watching the 
sparks as they chased each other up the wide-mouthed 
chimney. The perfect stillness which reigned in the 
room and the cheerful light thrown out by the dancing 
flames threw their influence over the old man and he 
seemed to see visions as he gazed into the fire ; vis- 
ions which took him back many years to the time 
when he was young and full of hope and aspiration. 

As he gazed the dearest face in all the world seemed 
to rise up before him ; not beautiful as the world 
counts beauty but yet made beautiful in the eyes of 
the dreamer by the tender memories surrounding it. 
Gentleness, patience and love shone out in every line 
of the careworn face. It was the face of his mother. 
He remembered how kind and patient she had been 
with all his childish pranks, how she sympathized with 
him in all his troubles, and how her love had followed 
him like a guardian angel. 

After a while, like a dissolving view, the face van- 
ished and he saw in its place the faces of his child- 
hood playmates, their bright eyes beaming upon him 
from out the merry fire. How the memory of those 
days rushed in upon him I He seemed to see the 
happy boys and girls as they trudged together to the 
little white school-house in the village. He remem- 
bered the duties and pleasures of his early school 
days. How he and Will had figured on their slates 
and struggled with other lessons which were never 
easy to learn. They had seemed like mountains in 
the eyes of the lads, but by perseverance they had 
been mastered; preparation had been gained for the 
more complex problems of life. 

As the fire burned on, the childish faces faded away 
and the friend of his college days rose up before him. 
It was the same faithful Will who toiled with him 
over the sums of his childhood days. Many a jolly 
time they had enjoyed together during those happy 
days, and together they had built castles in the air. 
How ambitious they were as they looked forward to 
lives of usefulness and influence in the world! Ah, 



AGGIE LIFE. 



83 



dear old Will, he has long since fulfilled his mission 
and gone to his reward. The influence of his noble, 
manly character comes like an inspiration to the old 
man, as he sighs for the companion of his youthful 
days. Then the face of his friend vanishes from his 
view. 

A falling ember suddenly caused a brilliant tongue 
of flame to issue from the burning logs and in the 
midst of its glory he saw a face strong and sweet. It 
was the face of her who had stood a score of years by 
his side and helped him to bear the burdens of ma- 
turity. His heart warmed within him as he thought 
of the wealth of love which had been his and which 
had brightened so many years of his life, She has 
passed on before him and awaits his coming. 

As the old man still sat gazing upon the picture be- 
fore him the face slowly passed out of sight and one 
by one the faces of his sons and daughters appeared 
before his eyes. How he delighted in them I He 
recalled their childish prattle and play, and it seemed 
but yesterday that they were around him in the old 
home. But they have grown to manhood and wom- 
anhood and now other homes are blessed by their 
presence. 

The fire ceased its crackling and the flames slowly 
died down. The old man awoke to find the faces of 
his loved ones gone and he sitting alone in the room 
with a longing for that home where there shall be no 
parting and where they shall go no more out forever. 

G. A. w. 



CAPTAIN ANDERSON'S TRIP. 

Captain Anderson arrived home on Tuesday Jan. 8 
after a most enjoyable trip across the continent. He 
started Dec. 17 at 7-20 a. m, and was just seven days 
going, making a stay of seven days in San Francisco. 
The route chosen was somewhat circuitous and made 
the time spent on the way a trifle longer than was 
actually necessary by a more direct route. This addi- 
tional time spent in traveling was greatly improved in 
studying the history and character of the country passed 
through, A short stop was made at Chicago, which 
seems to have made a poor impression on the captain's 
moral sense, thence the route was across Illinois, Iowa 
and Missouri, stops of a few hours being made at 
the more important places. Some of this country was 
very fertile and prosperous while other parts less pros- 



perous, seemed to be suffering on account of the 
liquor laws of the towns and cities. 

The fertility of southern Kansas is marked as being 
a very good example of the result of irrigation and 
tillage. Here the line entered Colorado, passing within 
view of Pike's Peak which rises 14,147 feet above sea 
level. Many interesting facts were learned in this 
comparatively little explored region ; of its history, its 
natural wonders and its prospects. It is in Colorado 
that so much red soil is found ; indeed this fact gave 
the name Colorado to that state. The names of most 
of the towns, cities and mountains of this section were 
taken from that of a saint or from some name in 
biblical history. 

Ben's Ford, otherwise known as "Hell's- half-acre," 
was here visited. This is a place of small area, the 
population of which is made up of outcasts and crimi- 
nals. It has been said that the proper way of making 
one's worldly exit at this place is with" one's boots on." 
Trinidad, a town built entirely of sun-dried brick was 
also visited. 

From Trinidad the route passed into New Mexico 
through Ratoon Pass where one may obtain the best 
steak one could wish for. The cliff dwellings of the 
Pulblo Indians in New Mexico were visited, one hav- 
ing over 1000 compart.ments hollowed out of the solid 
cliffs. These cliff dwellings are said to be safe from 
even the attack of modern artillery. A most remarka- 
ble farm was seen here in New Mexico which had an 
area of nearly two million acres, every part of which 
was under a high state of cultivation making it one 
great garden-spot. Starvation Peak is also here in 
New Mexico. This peak, which rises about two-thous- 
and feet directly from the surrounding plain and is 
quite inaccessible, is the subject of many Indian 
legends. 

Thence passing over several deserts and the Colorado 
River the route enters California. Some difficult 
engineering was required to lay a railroad over this 
country and " loops" and tunnels were often necessary 
to scale or descend many of the peaks. Needdless 
" the hottest place on earth " lies among these peaks 
and ridges. 

The captain now arrived at San Francisco after going 
over a beautiful reclaimed tract of desert. Horses are 
scarce in "Frisco" for the simple reason that they 
would be useless in the streets which incline at an angle 



84 



AGGIE LIFE. 



which would puzzle a cat to climb. In San Francisco 
the captain visited many points of great interest, among 
which were the Golden Gate and the huge rock all 
" bristling " with cannon, named Alcatias. 

Among the specimens brought home were several 
chips from the petrified forest of pines near Holbrook. 

The Captain's acquaintance with the " Far West " 
is by no means of recent date. In 1869 he was 
detailed for government service on the western plains 
when the country was far less thickly settled than now 
and was roamed by bands of warlike, marauding 
savages. Thirty years have made wonderful changes 
in the appearance of many places with which he was 
once familiar, and perhaps the not least interesting 
part of the Captain's talk was the comparison of the 
old with the new. After a pleasant stay in San Fran- 
cisco he bade goodbye to the officers of his old regi- 
ment, which was detailed for service in the Philip- 
pines, and left for home, arriving in Amherst Jan- 
uary 8th. 



PAN-AMERICAN SPORTS. 

The president of the Pan-American Exposition 
recently appointed a committee on sports, as follows : 
Jesse C. Dann, chairman, Dr. Charles Gary, J. McC. 
Mitchell, John B. Olmsted, Charles H. Ransom, 
Seward A. Simons, Wm. Burnet Wright, Jr. 

Soon after its appointment the committee invited 
the following named gentlemen to act as members of 
an advisory committee on amateur sports : Hon. 
Theodore Roosevelt, Walter Camp, C. C. Cuyler, C. 
S. Hyman (Canada), C H. Sherrill, A. A. Stagg. 
Benjamin Ide Wheeler, Casper Whitney. The 
appointment of this advisory committee emphasizes 
the desire of the committee to have all amateur com- 
petitions occupy the highest possible plane. 

The Stadium, with a seating capacity of 12,000 is 
beautiful in design and promises to be one of the most 
successful architectural creations of the Exposition. 
It will surround a quarter mile track with ground area 
ample for the requirements of all the events proposed. 

As to the nature of the athletic events planned, it 
may be said that amateur sports of all kinds will be 
encouraged as representing the most desirable of 
athletic competitions, and the members of the com- 
mittee on sports, being college graduates, particularly 
wish to make a special feature of college sports. In 



the management of inter-collegiate events, it is the 
desire of the committee that the various college asso- 
ciations be invited to undertake as far as possible the 
arrangement of the necessary details connected 
therewith. 

Although amateur sports will comprise a large part 
of the programme, it is proposed to have such a 
number of professional events as will allow visitors a 
opportunity to witness the athletic skill of the best pro- 
fessionals. The character of prizes that will be 
offered has not yet been definitely determined upon, 
but the assurance may be given that prizes will be 
awarded of value as lasting souvenirs of athletic suc- 
cess at the exposition. 

It is proposed to arrange a number of college base- 
ball and football games, and it is especially desired by 
the committee that the Eastern Inter-Collegiate 
(I. A. A. A.) track meeting be held in Buffalo next 
year. 

An ideal programme might be to hold in the Stadium 
the Eastern Inter-Collegiate meeting, then the West- 
ern Inter-Collegiate meeting ; these to be followed by 
a Pan-American meeting open to competitors in the 
two previous meetings and to representatives of other 
Inter-Collegiate associations. 

Other Inter-Collegiate events have been considered, 
such as La Crosse, Cross Country Running with start 
and finish in the Stadium, etc. 

The committee on sports hope that the exposition 
may have a full college representation. It is proposed 
to hold many other sports in the Stadium, the A. A. U. 
Championship, Lawn Tennis, LaCrosse, Cycling, 
Association Football, Water Sports, Trap and Target 
Shooting, etc. 



Special Ho. 1 of December 19tli, 1900, 
contains statements of interest to 
those in need of an education. It will 
be mailed, until edition is exhausted, to 
addresses sent to 

Alumni Advertising Committee, 
. Agr'l College, 
Amherst, Mass. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



85 



;f 



— W. Z. Chase, 1902, has left college. 

— Elwood and Raymouth, have joined the D. G. K. 
fraternity. 

— About thirty-two men have entered for the short 
winter courses. 

— F. L. Elsworth, of Holyoke, has entered the 
freshman class. 

— Sawin and Richardson, 1904, are taking the 
winter course. 

— Prof, and Mrs. Babson spent the holidays visiting 
friends in New York City. 

— The Farm department has taken about 200 tons 
of ice from the college pond. 

— The Chemical department has placed con)bina- 
tion locks on the cupboards in the junior laboratory, 

— Those freshmen having joined the Q. T. V. fra- 
ternity are : Witt, Baker, Kelliher, Lewis, Graves 
and Collins. 

— The following freshmen have joined the P. S. K. 
fraternity: Griffin, White, Gay, Couden, Haffenraffer, 
Thompson and Allen. 

— The committee in charge of the Boston Alumni 
banquet has arranged a program without set speakers, 
a new departure which will probably meet with general 
approval. 

— A new transformer is soon to be placed in South 
College, the old one having a capacity for running 
about eighty lights whereas over one hundred have 
been burned steadily. 

— President H. H, Goodell, who recently returned 
from an important business visit in Washington to 
attend to the appropriation bill now before the Legisla- 
ture, has again returned to Amherst. 

— The date fixed for the Junior Prom, is Wednes- 
day, Feb. 13. Twelve pieces of Warner's orchestra 
of Northampton will furnish the music. P. C. Brooks 
has charge of the hack arrangements. 

— The following officers have been chosen by the 
members of the Forensic club : President, T. Casey ; 
1st vice-president, R. W. Morse ; 2d vice-president, 
M. H. West ; secretary and treasurer, J. H. Chick- 
ering. 



— In a little pamphlet published by the S. S. Mc- 
Clure Co. of New York city we find the name of Her- 
man Babson as a contributor. The Professor's arti- 
cle is a story of sentiment entitled "Jim." 

— The class of 1 902 has elected the following offi- 
cers : President, A. L. Dacy ; vice-president, H. L. 
Bodfish ; secretary and treasurer, J.C.Hall; basket- 
ball captain, J. M. Dellea ; sergeant at arms, H. E. 
Hodgkiss. 

— The Alumni advertising committee has made a 
reprint of the Agcie Life issue of Dec. 19th. for dis- 
tribution throughout the state. Names of all persons 
to whom the reprint may be of interest should be 
sent to Belden, Bodfish, Cook, or Dacy, 1902. 

— C. A. Tinker, 1903, has left college for the re- 
mainder of the College year ; he will enter again next 
fall. He is now preparing, under the direction of the 
Agricultural department, illustrative charts which will 
be a part of the College exhibit at the Exposition at 
Buffalo. 

— The next meeting of the Chemical Club will be 
held Monday evening, January 28th in the Chemical 
Lecture room at 7-30 p. m. sharp. The subject of 
the meeting will be the life and work of Kolbe. A 
cordial invitation is extended to all students interested 
in chemistry. 

— A course in Geology has been arranged for the 
spring term of the junior year under the instruction of 
Professor Howard, although Professor Lull will take 
charge for the first term. Some lectures will prob- 
ably be given on this subject during the winter term 
by speakers of the College Lecture course. 

— The following men from the class of 1904 have 
joined the Shakespearean club : D. W. Kirby, A. L. 
Peck, J. F. Cummings, H. C. Pierce, J. A. Pease, 
R. A. Quigley, E. A. Back, S. B. Haskell, R. S. 
Handy, P. F. Staples, S. R. Parker, J. J. Fahey, L. 
W. Hill, H. D. Newton, H. L. Barnes, J. W. Gregg, 
E. T. Esip and F. F. Henshaw. 

— " Resolved, That the retention of the Philippines 
as colonies is for the best interests of all parties 
concerned," was the subject debated by the Forensic 
Club at their meeting last Wednesday night. Affirm- 
ative, J. B. Henry and M. H. West. Negative, H. 
L. Knight and W, W. Peebles. Critic, T. Casey. 



86 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Judges, j. H. Chickering, R. W. Morse and M. A. 
Blake. The decision was in favor of the negative, 
both sides having shown much thought and careful 
preparation. 

— Professor Lull, who is a member of the Society 
of the American Museum of Natural History, spent 
the holiday vacation in New York city pursuing ad- 
vanced research in Paleontology in the Departrrent 
of Paleontology of the Museum. It will be remem- 
bered that Professor Lull accompanied an expedition 
sent out in the summer of 1899 by the American 
Museum, Department of Paleontology, for field work in 
the Bad Lands of Wyoming. 

— A large collection of insects has been sent to 
Dr. Charles H. Fernald with a request for description 
of new species. At the request of one of the Euro- 
pean journals Dr. Fernald has also undertaken to pre- 
pare a paper on the growth of entomology in America 
during the past century. He is also busy with a mon- 
ograph and catalogue of the Pyralidas of North Amer- 
ica. As soon as the above works are out of the way 
he will devote his time to the preparation of a mono- 
graph of the Tortricidas of the World, a family of 
Lepidopterous insects to the study of which he has 
devoted much time during the last twenty-five years. 

— The plan of the faculty for a change in the col- 
lege year was adopted by the trustees. There will be 
two semesters instead of three terms. The first 
semester will begin Thursday, Sept. 19, 1901, instead 
of Sept. 5, thus making the summer vacation two 
weeks longer than formerly. Only one day will be 
given for Thanksgiving, instead of five days as former- 
ly. The Christmas vacation will last two weeks, 
from Dec. 19 to Jan. 2, 1902. The first semester 
will end Feb. 5, the second will begin Feb. 6, and 
will end commencement day, Wednesday, June 18. 
This change will reduce the number of exams, 
from three to two. 



THE NATURAL HISTORY CLUB. 

The Natural History club is arranging for a series 
of lectures to be given before the students during the 
winter. A committee is at work preparing a program 
which it hopes to complete at an early date. It is 
also planned to have a program of meetings of the 
Club at which papers will be read by members of the 
Club, 



BEFORE THE LEGISLATURE. 

An important appropriation bill providing for neces- 
sary improvements and repairs upon the College 
grounds, has been introduced into the Legislature and 
has been referred to the committee on Agriculture. 
The bill contains provisional clauses as follows : For 
the painting of the College buildings ; for putting in 
bathing facilities in the gymnasium ; for making re- 
pairs in the laboratory of the Department of Vegeta- 
ble Pathology ; for making repairs in the Botanical 
Laboratory ; for building additional cases in the Botan- 
ical Museum ; for building for the students a new 
boarding-house. 



FORENSIC CLUB. 

The officers for the winter term have been elected 
as follows : President, Thomas Casey ; vice-presidents, 
R. W. Morse and M. H. West; secretary and treas- 
urer, J. H. Chickering. 

The first regular debate of the term was held Jan. 
9, the subject being, " Resolved, That the retention of 
the Philippines as colonies is for the best interests of 
all concerned." The affirmative side of the question 
tion was taken by J. B. Henry and M. H. West; W. 
W. Peebles and H. L. Knight were the speakers for 
negative, Mr. Henry opened the discussion by giving 
an account of the present condition of the Philippines 
and the plan to educate the people of the islands. 
Mr. Knight was the first negative speaker. He 
showed wherein the U. S. was erring in taking free- 
dom from the Filipinos: for centuries they fought with 
Spain for freedom and now the United States is tak- 
ing it from them. 

The next speaker was Mr. West. He quoted from 
Senator Beveridge saying that of the five million Fili- 
pinos there were not a thousand who were capable of 
setting up a government of their own and that we 
should educate them until they are fit to govern them - 
selves. The last speaker, Mr. Peebles, refuted the 
arguments of his opponents and then said that the 
Filipinos helped the Uuited States in her war with 
Spain. When they had freedom within their grasp 
another country stepped in and took it away. The 
American colonies rose against England for freedom 
and have now forgotten the principles for which they 
fought. 

It was an exceedingly interesting debate. The 



AGGIE LIFE. 



87 



judges decided In favor of the negative speakers. T. 
Casey acted as critic for tiie evening. His principal 
criticism was that the speakers did not adhere to the 
subject. 

It was suggested that the night of the meeting be 
changed from Wednesday to Tuesday of each week. 
As it is necessary to bring up any proposed change in 
the constitution one week previous to definite action 
the matter of change of night will be considered and 
voted upon at next meeting. 



SOCIAL GATHERING. 

A committee of delegates from the different frater- 
nities acting with a committee from the ladies of the 
faculty are arranging for a social gathering to be held 
in the chapel, Friday evening, January 18th at 8 
o'clock. A program consisting of a talk by Miss 
Goessmann and several numbers of music will be fol- 
lowed by an informal sociable and refreshments. It is 
earnestly hoped that all connected with the College 
will avail themselves of this opportunity to forward the 
interests of our social life. Electric cars for the con- 
venience of guests will run as follows: For the college 
from the Amherst House 7-35; from the college a 
special car at 10-35. 



CHEMICAL CLUB. 

A meeting was held Monday evening Jan. 7. 
The programme consisted of a talk by Profes- 
sor Howard on " The Philosopher of Organic 
Chemistry, August Kekule," a study of portraits of 
eminent chemists and a social good time. Professor 
Howard said in part : 

A diligent youth excelling in Mathematics and draw- 
ing, at first choosing architecture for his life work, 
Kekule went to the University of Giessen where under 
Liebig's instruction he soon became interested in 
Chemistry. He confined his intellectual forces and, 
becoming an architectual chemist, he designed and 
worked out theories which should explain and bring into 
line various compounds and reactions which were not, 
in his time intelligible. 

Some important ideas were advanced by Kekule 
namely, " The Linking of the Carbon Atoms " and 
" The Benzene Ring." Based upon these have been 
the work of the past quarter century of research in 



Organic Chemistry and our present theories as to con- 
stitution of compounds. 

Industrial and Theretical Chemistry are thus what 
they are because of Kekule"s contributions to the 
science. Among his students have been Baeyer, 
Hiibner, Korner, Sadenburg, Sinnemann, Wickelhaus, 
Carey Foster, and Dewar at Ghent, and Anschiitz, 
Bedsen, Bernthsen, Carnelly, Claisen, Dittmar, Fran- 
chimont van't Hoff, Klinger, G. Schultz, Thorpe, 
Wallach, and Zincke at Boun, 



WINTER COURSES. 

ENTERING CLASSES. 

Dairy Fanning, Partial Horticulture, Entomology. 
Dickinson, Robt. J., Woodbridge, Ct. 
Eaton, Benjamin E., Brockton, 
Gillette, Dwight L., Cheshire, Ct. 
Gibson, Howard L., Groton. 
Raddins, Charles M., Groton. 
Stockpole, Benjamin H., Hallowell, Me. 
Streeter, Charles W., Ludlow Centre. 
Tupper, Bertram, Barre Plains. 
Whitney, Frank J., Amherst. 
Yale, Walter L., Meriden, Ct. 

Dairy Farming, Partial Horticulture. 
Allen, G. Howard, Auburndale. 
Bartlett, Dwight S., Belchertown. 
Chase, Frank W., Westboro. 
Child. William C, Woodstock, Ct. 
Crouch, Archie A., Worcester, 
Dunbar, Charles E., Orange, 
Harlowe, Ward A., Cummington. 
Purnes, Goeffrey V., Bedford. 
Richardson, H. G, Woburn. 
Willis, George W., North Amherst. 

Dairy Farming. 
Billings, Harry H., Amherst. 
Richardson, Charles H., Boxboro. 
Sawin, Ralph D., Boston. 

Dairy Farming, Entomology. 
Hammond, Merle Kimball, Onset. 
Williams, Carle L., North Orange. 

Horticulture, Cliemistry, Zoology. 
Munson, Edward M., South Dartmouth. 
Wood, Leroy E. S., Upton. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Dairy Farming, Entomology, Extra Veterinary. 
Hunt, Thomas F. , Weston. 

Dairy Farming, Horticulture. 
Richardson, Harlan L., Boxboro, 

Dairy Farming, Partial Horticulture, Chemistry. 
Scott, Alexander, Boston, (Yale '96.) 

Dairy Farming, Partial Horticulture, Entomology, 
Extra Veterinary. 
Smith, Lawrence B., Groton. 

Horticulture, Zoology, 
Back, Ernest A., Florence. 
Dairy Farming, Partial Horticulture, Entomology, Extra 

Agriculture. 
Mead, Philip H., Silver Creek. 



Y. M. C. A. 



A DAY OF PRAYER. 



Sunday, February 10th, 1901, has been appointed 
as the Universal Day of Prayer for Students Some 
observance of the day will probably be made by the 
local Y. M. C. A. and a speaker will probably be 
secured. 

This day was designated by the general committee 
of the World's Student Christian Federation and is 
endorsed by the International Committee of Young 
Men's Christian Associations and by the American 
committee of Young Women's Christian Associations, 
and will be observed throughout the 1 ,000 Associa- 
tions which constitute these movements, as well as 
by the Christian student organizations of all other 
lands. Thus it establishes a union of prayer between 
the students of every denomination in every country 
of the world. 

This day is not intended to supersede the day of 
prayer for colleges which has been designated by a 
number of denominations, but has been selected be- 
cause it is the only day on which the students of all 
countries of the world could unite. In the case of 
denominational colleges the committee has suggested 
that the day appointed by their church be observed. 

The following general call has been issued : 

THE CALL TO THE UNIVERSAL DAY OF PRAYER FOR STUDENTS. 

The General Committee of the World's Student Chri.stian 
Federation at their meeting held in Versailles, France, in 
August, 1900, appointed Sunday, February 10th, 1901, as the 
Universal^Day of Prayer tor Students. The committee 



which has appointed this day includes official representatives 
of the Christian student movements of Germany, Scandina- 
via. Great Britain, France, the Netherlands, Switzerland- 
the United States, Canada, Australia, South Africa, as well as 
Japan, India, Ceylon, China, and other mission lands, in- 
cluding 1,400 student societies, with a membership of 65, 
000 students and professors. During the past three years 
this day has been observed in over thirty different countries 
by Christian students and by people specially interested in 
the work of Christ among students. 

To ensure the most fruitful use of the day the following 
points should be emphasized : 

(1) Let the Christian students of each university and col- 
lege take advantage of this opportunity both by entering into 
the heritage of the prayers of Christians all over the world on 
behalf of students, and by putting forth wise, earnest effort ; 
and let the day give a marked impetus to the work of Christ 
among students. It should be characterized, as in other 
years, by real spiritual awakenings. 

(2) Wherever practicable let the Saturday preceding or the 
Monday following Sunday, February 10th, be devoted by the 
Christian students to special meetings and to personal dealing. 

(3) The prayers of the Church should be enlisted on behalf 
of the progress of Christ's Kingdom among students. To 
this end let the Call to Prayer, together with facts regarding 
the student movement, be printed in the religious papers. Let 
clergymen be requested to preach sermons in the interest of 
the spiritual welfare of students, and to call forth more 
prayer for students. 

(4) Let the primary object of the day be borne in mind 
and realized ; the promotion of intercession on behalf of stu- 
dents. The great need in all parts of the student world is 
that of a mighty manifestation of the power of the Gospel of 
Jesus Christ. The Word of God and the history of the 
Church prove abundantly that such a work of the Holy 
Spirit is a direct result of definite, fervent, and believing 
prayer. 

On behalf of the General committee of the World's Student 
Christian Federation. 

Karl Fries, Chairman, 

Stockholm, Sweden. 
John R. Mott, General Secretary, 

3 West 29th Street, New York City. 
December 1, 1900. 



AGGIE LIFE. 

SPECIAL NOTICE. 

At a meeting of the Aggie Life board of editors 
held Jan. 11, 1901, f he following amendment to the 
Rules and Regulations of the Board was adopted, 
upon the recommendation of the committee on 
amendment : 

Competition for positions on this Board shall be 
open to all students of this college and contributions 



AGGIE LIFE. 



89 



are solicited at all times. All such contributions shall 
be considered in the election of new men. In addi- 
tion to this competition recommendations from the 
English department shall, whenever the Board deem 
it advisable, be submitted not later than March 1st. 
The list of those thus recommended together with 
those who have previously contributed shall be pub- 
lished in the following issue of Aggie Life. The men 
whose names are in this published list may then be- 
come eligible by submitting at least one additional 
article before the closing of the competition on March 
21st. The election of new members shall then be 
made, on the basis of merit and ability, from the list 
of those who thus become eligible ; it being under- 
stood that in all cases of doubt the preference shall be 
given to those who contributed prior to March 1st. 

In the case of vacancies occurring after the annual 
election the same procedure shall be followed except 
that the date for the receiving of recommendations 
and the closing of competition shall be decided by the 
Board. 

At a meeting of the senior members of the 
Board, V. A. Gates, 1902, was chosen assistant edi- 
tor, A. L. Dacy resigned. 



Seven out of the twenty foot-ball captains for the 
last season played at end, five at halfback, four at full- 
back, four at guard, two at quarter, three at tackle 
and none at center. 

Harvard has decided to give up her Veterinary 
School, on account of the small number of students 
and a lack of funds. It is the first time in Harvard's 
history that any department has had to be abandoned. 

The main barn of the Rhode Island Agricultural 
College was recently burned to the ground. It was 
feared for a time that the flames would spread to the 
remaining buildings, but the efficient work of the cadet 
battalion saved all except the main structure and the 
loss is comparatively small. 

The total registration at Smith College is 1 1 46. 
The catalogue further shows that but seven students 
were obliged to leave the college last year on account 
of scholarship. This is about one in 150 which indi- 
cates that the stories so current about wholesale 
"flunking" are slightly exaggerated. 



It costs the athletic management of Columbia no 
less than $20,000 a year for the rent of an athletic 
field and as a result the receipts though very large are 
insufficient to pay expenses. Purchasing an athletic 
field has been contemplated, but the most available 
area consists of but two blocks and the price asked is 
only $2,000,000. 

Students of St. Lawrence University are making an 
effort to have college songs introduced into the morn- 
ing chapel service, on the plea that such daily procedure 
will intensify college spirit. An inter-fraternity agree- 
ment such as we now have whereby men cannot be 
pledged during the fall term is also being discussed and 
is in a fair way of being adopted. 

A radical change has been made in the conditions 
exacted of professors at the Andover Theological 
Seminary. Heretofore every instructor has been 
obliged to subscribe to the Nicean Creed, and the con- 
servative element has doggedly opposed any change. 
They have had to give away at last however, and hence- 
forward no such pledge will be required. 

The recent death of Rev. John G. Fee, the heroic 
founder of Berea College brings to mind the stirring 
history of that institution. Established in the moun- 
tains of Kentucky by Northern men just prior to the 
civil war, it had no small influence in holding Ken- 
tucky loyal to the union. Numerous attempts were 
made by the Southerners to break it up, and its organ- 
izers had many thrilling escapes. During the war 
indeed it was obliged to suspend; but on the close of 
the struggle it again resumed its work and was a 
powerful influence during the reconstruction days. 
To-day it stands as one of the notable institutions of 
the South. 



FRATERNITY CONFERENCE. 

The Conference met on Friday evening, January 
1 1th, to consider a communication from the ladies of 
the Faculty. The following is an abstract: 

" The ladies of the Agricultural College Faculty 
will unanimously and heartily cooperate with the 
Fraternity Conference in arranging for a College 
gathering." 

The Conference expressed itself as unanimously in 
favor of cooperating with the ladies in arranging a 
gathering and voted to recommend to the several fra- 



go 



AGGIE LIFE 



ternities that a committee of two from each fraternity 
be chosen to represent that fraternity in a genera] 
committee, consisting of eight men, which should 
meet with a committee from the ladies of the Faculty 
and arrange a programme. The Conference voted, 
also, to recommend January 18th as the most suita- 
ble date. The chairman of the Conference was 
chosen temporary chairman of the committee to act 
until it should organize and elect a permanent chair- 
man. Copies of the communication were sent to 
each fraternity for approval. 

MEMBERSHIP. 

^ P J, ( Dr. C. Wellington, 
ir- , ^; -^ J. B. Henry, 1901, 
Fraternity. Vj. m. Qvalle, 1901. 



< Dr. J. B. Paige, 
^- /• ^; } R. I. Smith. 1901, 
Fraternity. | j, h. Todd. 1901. 

„, . e- ( Prof. F. S. Cooley, 

Phi Sigma ) . ^ ,,,., .^x, 

y. ^ -<^ A. C. Wilson, 1901, 

Rappa. ^j j_j_ Chickering, 1901. 

„, , (A. C. Monahan, 

Sha^^fP,^a^^^")C. E.Gordon. 1901, 
^'"°- ( H. L. Knight. 1902. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

Two interesting books of fiction have lately been 
added : 

Boy. by Marie Corelli is an' excellent character 
sketch. It is the life history of a boy born and brought 
up under unpromising circumstances, to say the least. 
He is sent to school in France and afterwards enters 
the army ; while in service to his country he is killed. 
He has many bad traits inherited from his father but 
the few good qualities, at times, shine out with a won- 
derful lustre and completely overshadow the others. 

Gentleman from Indiana, by Booth Tarkington. A 
story of a college graduate who seeks his fortune as 
the editor of a paper in a western town. The threads 
of a love story which serve to relieve the monotony of 
the book, can be detected running through the whole. 
The book is well written, the plot is well carried out 
which makes it all very interesting. When once the 
reader begins the book there seems to be no halting 
place and it is his desire to read it through. There is 
no place where the interest lags. 

We will give a short account of some of the more 
important scientific works that are new to the library. 



The Fundamental Laws of Electrolytic Conduction, 
edited by H. M. Goodwin, Ph. D., assistant profes- 
sor of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
In this volume are collected those papers on electro- 
chemistry which contain the original statement of the 
fundamental laws and experiments on which the mod- 
ern theory of electrolytic conduction is based. Fara- 
day's law of definite electro-chemical action and elec- 
tro-chem.ical equivalents, first stated in 1834, natur- 
ally takes precedence. Second only to Faraday's 
law, the classical researches of Hittorf on the concen- 
tration changes produced at the electrodes during 
electrolysis, have proved of fundamental significance. 
Later Kolrausch pointed out the bearing of these 
papers on his investigations on the electrical conduc- 
tivity of solutions. 

Surgical Operations, by W. Pfeiffer and W. L. 
Williams. V. S. This book, being especially designed 
for Veterinary students and practitioners, we will pass 
over with a few words. It is well illustrated on all 
the principal points and is highly recommended for 
practical purposes. It is merely a handbook and the 
minor operations (sutures, cautery, catherization, etc.) 
the instruction regarding instruments and bandaging, 
as well as the methods of restraint, have not been 
considered. 

Diseases of the Dog and their Treatment, by Dr. 
George Miiller ; translated, revised and augmented by 
Alexander Glass. A.M.. V. S., of the University of 
Pennsylvania. This book will, perhaps, be of interest 
to a few only but it is well worth our consideration. 
In the translation the original has been closely fol- 
lowed but. in the proper places, the translator has 
added the results of his own observations and also 
everything of value that has been added to veterinary 
sciences since the appearance of Dr. Miiller's work. 
Speculations and hypotheses have been almost entire- 
ly left out, but plain facts have received careful atten- 
tion. There are ninety-three illustrations scattered 
throughout the work ; some of these have been ob- 
tained from other works but the majority are original. 



THE ZOOLOGICAL MUSEUM. 

The increased space afforded by the addition of 
three new cases to the zoological museum has per- 
mitted a rearrangement of the specimens on a more 



AGGIE LIFE. 



91 



satisfactory and systematic basis. The collection may 
now be studied in the ''natural order." 

Extending transversely across the center of the 
room is a large new case devoted to mammals. On 
the west side are two other new cases for birds; on 
the east side the two old cases for mammals. Ex- 
tending around the room are the narrow cupboard 
cases which have been entirely rearranged within. 
Four of the floor cases are partitioned by stanchions 
or by boards thus greatly increasing the available space 
for shelves. Each case is marked in large white 
letters with the name of the class or type to which the 
specimens belong, and each specimen is accurately 
labeled. 

The museum now contains the following classified 
collections arranged according to the "natural order:" 
Type, Coelentera; a very full collection of sponges 
{Porifera) and corals; type, (Molluscd), with the excep- 
tion of a few cephalopods, made up of gastropod and 
bivalve mollusks arranged by genera; type, Arthro- 
poda, Crustacea and Tracheata, a large number of 
lepidopterous insects mounted in cotton or plaster 
casts and fastened against a red background, make a 
very attractive exhibit; type Vermes, worms, collec- 
tion small; type. Echinodermata, sea-urchins and star- 
fish; class Pisces, fishes, very full; class, Amphibia, 
frogs, salamanders ; class, Reptilia, reptiles very full, 
an especial feature is the collection of photographs of 
restorations of some prehistoric dinosaurs; class, Aves 
birds, very full, aquatic, insectivorous, and song, birds 
of prey; class. Mammalia, mammals, the most impor- 
tant and well represented. There are also some skel- 
etons of vertebrate species and some photographs of 
restorations of prehistoric mammals. There is also a 
large egg case, and one for the ethnological collection. 
The cases are all lettered as the specimens are to be 
catalogued. 



CALENDAR FOR 1901— 1902. 

Jan. 2, Wednesday, winter term begins, at 8 a. m. 

Mar. 21, Thursday, winter term closes, at 10-15 a. m. 

Apr. 3, Wednesday, spring term begins, at 8 a. m. 

June 19, Wednesday, Commencement exercises. 

Sept. 19, Thursday, fall semester begins, at 8 a. m. 

Dec. 19, Thursday, to ) . , .. 

I o 1 r>^o -T-u J r winter vacation. 
Jan. 2, 1902, Thursday, j 

Feb. 5, Wednesday, fall semester ends, at 8 a. m. 



Feb. 6, Thursday, spring semester begins, at 8 a. m. 

Mar. 29, Saturday to ) 

Apr. 2, Wednesday, | ^F'ng recess. 

June 18, Wednesday, Commencement exercises. 



Recess. 



2 wks. 



Division of College year into periods : 

Exercise. 
Sept. 19 to Dec. 19, 13 wks. 
Dec. 19 to Jan. 2, 
Jan. 2 to Feb. 6, 5 wks. 

Feb. 6 to Mar. 29. 7 wks. 2 dys. 
Mar. 29 to April 2, 
Apr. 2 to June 18, 11 wks. 1 dy. 
June 18 to Sept. 18, 13 wks. 

Total 36 wks. 3 dys., 15 wks. 4 dys. 



4 dys. 



A GIFT TO THE COLLEGE. 

In the will of the late J. D. W. French, a former 
trustee of the College, is a clause giving to the library 
of the College, all books and pamphlets in his library 
dealing with agriculture or horticulture. 



BY-LAWS OF THE M. A. C FORENSIC CLUB. 

Article I. 
An executive committee consisting of the officers 
of the club shall be organized with the president of the 
club as chairman. 

Article II. 
The regular meetings of the club shall be held at 7 
o'clock sharp. 

Article III. 
A quorum shall consist of ten members. 

Article IV. 
All officers of the club shall hold office for one term 
subject to re-election. 

Article V. 
The regular order of exercises shall be as follows : 
Roll call. 

Minutes of previous meeting. 
News of the week. 
Debate or substitutes. 
General business. 
Adjournment. 

Rules of Procedure. 
Article VI. 
All questions of debate shall be decided by three 
judges, chosen by the chair from among the members 
present. 



92 



AGGIE I.IFE. 



Article VII. 

A critic shall be chosen by the chair for each debate. 
Article VIII. 

A period of ten minutes shall be given to each of 
the principal speakers of the debate, after which there 
shall be a one minute pause before a principal 
speaker can be recognized by the chair. After the 
debate has been thrown open to the house no member 
shall occupy the floor for a period exceeding three 
minutes, at any one time. 

Article IX. 
For all rules of debate not governed by the By-Laws, 
" Reed's Parliamentary Rules " shall be considered as 
official. 

Article X. 
These By-Laws shall be subject to change by a 
two-thirds vote of the members of the club. 



liimnio 



The latest list of addresses of the class of '93 was 
published January first and is a very neat production. 
We take the liberty to publish the list of addresses as 
set forth in that last : 

Joseph Baker, Riverside farm, New Boston, Conn. 

*Fred G. Bartlett, Superintendent of cemetary, cor- 
ner of Cabot and Sycamore Sts., Holyoke, Mass. 

*Henry D. Clark, Veterinary surgeon, 12 Mechanic 
St., Fitchburg, Mass. 

*Geo. F. Curley, Physician and surgeon, 234 Main 
St., Milford, Mass. 

Herbert C. Davis, Railway postal clerk, 93 S. Pryor 
St., Atlanta, Ga. 

Chas. A. Goodrich, Physician and surgeon, 5 Haynes 
St.. Hartford, Conn. 

Francis T. Harlow, Farmer, Marshfield, Mass. 

*Harry J. Harlow, Farmer, Shrewsbury, Mass. 

Ernest A. Hawkes, Evangelist, Fourth and Broad 
Sts., Richmond, Va. 

*Frank H. Henderson, Civil engineer, 334 Cross 
St., Maiden, Mass. 

*Edwin C. Howard, Principal of Schools, New 
Hartford, Conn. 

*Franklin S. Hoyt, Supervising school principal of 
Winchester District, 91 Alden Ave., New Haven, 
Conn. 



Eugene H. Lehnert, Veterinarian, 86 Church St., 
Clinton, Mass. 

*A. Edward Melendy, Farmer, Sterling, Mass. 

*John R. Perry. Painter and Decorator, 8 Bos- 
worth St.. Boston, Mass. 

Cotton A. Smith, Secretary and treasurer, N. B. 
Blackstone Co., Los Angeles, Cal. 

*Fred A. Smith, Florist and nurseryman, 265 Eu- 
clid Ave., Lynn, Mass. 

*Luther W. Smith, Farm mianager, Highland farm, 
Manteno, 111. 

*Henry F. Staples, Physician and surgeon, Solon, 
Ohio. 

*Luiz A. F. Tinoco, Sugar planter and manufac- 
turer, Campos, Brazil. 

*Edward J. Walker, Mixed farming, Box 315 
Clinton, Mass. 



*Married. 



L. C. Claflin, Editor-in-Chief. 
R. W. Morse, Business Manager. 

^°" < « i 



(VOLUME XXXII) 
Published Annually by the Junior Class. 



To the Public : — We wish to announce that the 
Year Book of the Class of 1902 is being compiled 
and that time, thought, work, and money are not 
being spared to make the XXXII Volume of the 
Index an accurate summary of the past college year 
and the mouthpiece of college thought and sentiment ; 
as well as an ornament and a credit to our college. 

To interest in the 1902 Index ^.W who are interested 
in " Old Aggie " is the hope of 

The 1902 " Index " Board. 



DRAWING AND BLUE PROCESS PAPERS, 

SCALES, ANGLES, CURVES and T SQUARES, 

ARCHITECTS' AND DRAFTMEN'S COLORS, 

SCHOOL BOXES WATER COLORS, 



INCORPORATED, 
82 and 84 Washington St., \ T>nQTn'Nr 
216 and 218 Clarendon St., / ""''^^^^" 
Faotories, MALDEN, MASS. 




VOL. XI. 



AMHERST. MASS., FEBRUARY 6, 1901, 



NO. 8 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will be sent 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

CLARENCE EVERETT GORDON, 1901, Editor-in-Chief. 
NATHAN DAVIS WHITMAN, 1901, Business Manager. 
LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, 1902, Assistant Business Manager. 

Assistant Editors. 

CHARLES LESLIE RICE, 1901. 
THOMAS CASEY, 1901. 
CHARLES MILTON KINNEY, 1902. 
RICHARD HENDRIC ROBERTSON, 1903. 



JAMES HENRY CHICKERING, 1901. 
HOV/ARD LAWTON KNIGHT, 1902. 
VICTOR ADOLPH GATES. 1902. 
NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN, 1903. 



Terms: $1.00 per year in adcance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside oS United States and Canada, 2Sc. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot- Ball Association, 

College Boarding Club, 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

G. R. Bridgeforth, Pres. Athletic Association, 
C. L. Rice, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

J. H. ChickeringSec. Nineteen Hundred and Two Index, 

Reading-Room, C. T. Leslie, Secretary. 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
C. L. Rice, Manager. 
R. W, Morse, Manager. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



i^iSi 



There seems to be prevalent among many of the 
alumni a feeling that the faculty of the College should 
be represented at the reunions of the two principal 
alumni clubs of the college. The students and alumni 
show their interest at these reunions and why ought not 
the faculty to show an equal interest ? Do these 
reunions mean anything ? We think they do. The 
possibility of their meaning more and more is certainly 
dependent upon the enthusiasm and interest shown in 
them. Oneway,we firmly believe,by which this interest 
maybe increased is in the sending of a delegate from 
the faculty to attend these annual reunions. We think 
that the officers of the Clubs would favorably consider 
the idea and would make it a point to annually extend 
an invitation to the faculty to send a representative as 
their official delegate. No set speeches or long dis- 
sertations on the needs of the college, although these 
things should always be in the mind of our loyal men, 



are necessary to make the meeting of those who are 
supposed to be equally interested in the welfare of the 
College, a pleasant and profitable one to all concerned. 

We are pleased to notify the public in general that 
the long-expected 1902 Index is out. We suppose 
that some comment on the character and merits of 
this recent addition to now the somewhat lengthy list of 
publications of our College annual is in order. We wish 
to overcome, if possible, before dwelling on the book as 
such, some of the prejudice that probably exists be- 
cause the book been so long in coming out. The 
editors have been industrious in their efforts to meet 
the demand and deeply regret that circumstances pre- 
vented them from publishing their annual at an ear- 
lier date. With the exception of a few places here 
and there the book shows carefulness and thoughtful- 
ness in compilation, although there are some evi- 
dences of haste, which we think might have been 
avoided had there been a little more thoroughness. 
But here again we feel that some indulgence is due 



94 



AGGIE LIFE. 



the chief of the board who had to contend with some 
of that exasperating, not to say galling, indifference 
which everyone who is placed, or has been placed, in 
a position similar to his own can attest. While there 
was some difficulty in hurrying things because of lack 
of team work yet the principal cause for delay — so 
we understand — was in the weather which during the 
fall was hardly propitious for developing many of the 
plates used in illustrating. If such were the case, of 
course the conditions must be considered before pass- 
ing judgment on the long delay. Passing by the data 
pertaining to the classes and the fraternities, which 
differs but little from the usual run, and turning to 
the more distinctly literary part we find on the whole 
very commendable work. There is considerable 
verse and a reminiscent account of a class experience, 
but no attempt at a story. There are the usual squibs 
in which everybody comes in for the gentle roasting 
that is supposed to give spice to the subjects' lives. 
The artistic work is, on the whole, very good. One 
or two plates show that a good deal of hard work was 
put on them, with a praiseworthy result. As in past 
cases there are instances where the matter " would 
better have been left out." We hope that future 
classes will profit by public disapproval. The outside 
of the volume is attractive and the book will make a 
valuable addition to the library of any stndent or 
alumnus. We shall have to leave other interesting 
details for the peruser. We recommend the book to 
all, hoping that the Board will receive loyal support, 
especially from the alumni and students, whose assist- 
ance is earnestly requested in the publication of our 
College annual if the book is to be kept up to a re- 
spectable standard in the coming years. 



AN EXPERIMENT. 

(Competitive.) 

We sat before the great logfire, watching the flames 
rise and fall. We could hear the wind whistling round 
the corner of the house, and an occasional patter on 
the window pane, gave evidence of the rain. We 
could almost hear our own thoughts. The silence 
grew monotonous. 

" Rene, wake up, we're not waiting for pins to drop. 
Say something." 

" Well, Sanborn, I was wishing some one would 
speak. I don't know what you fellows are thinking of ; 



but for some reason as I sit here, I recall the peculiar 
way in which a young fellow was started in his 
life work. He is now one of the brightest in his pro- 
fession, and a rising politician. When we were stu- 
dents together at M — he was one of the dullest fellows 
in his class. In oratory, especially, he was poor, and 
didn't seem to care whether he improved or not. I 
liked him, roomed near him, and we were often 
together. I tried to spur him on, but each effort proved 
a failure. 

One evening while half a dozen of us were in his 
room ; an idea of helping him, came to me. I had 
been giving a few tests in hypnotism (you know hyp- 
notism was then in its infancy and in the experimental 
stage) with the assistance of Gus Horner, when the 
thought came to me to give Jim an oration while he is 
hypnotized. I put the thoughts in words and the fellows 
asked me to try it ;■ there could be no harm in it what- 
ever, and some good might result, and it would be 
intensely interesting. 

Jim was willing to try it, so I placed him in con- 
dition to receive the impressions. He was to be, in 
fact, a human phonograph. I would deliver an oration 
to him, and have him repeat it, as I gave it to him. 
I recalled an oration I had delivered in B. on the 
" Power of Truth " and thought it good for the present 
case, as it afforded opportunities for fine distinctions 
in expression. I began, and as I went on it seemed 
as though some one had hypnotized me, and that I 
was uttering another's thoughts. I forgot that I was 
speaking to a few fellows, I thought of my subject, I 
appealed to the best that is in them, the highest ambi- 
tions, the noblest purposes. My whole being was 
thrown into my words. When I finished, the fellows 
sank back with a sigh of relief and said they hadn't 
expected anything like that — in fact I hadn't myself. 

We looked at Jim. He sat there silent and 
motionless, seeming to have no interest in anything, 
his eyes intently fixed on me. I gave him the proper 
suggestions, and then brought him out of his hypnotic 
state. It was very late by this time, so we separated. 
I had decided to tell Dr. Milbrook in the morning, the 
reasons for Jim having a different oration from the 
one first selected, feeling sure that he would make 
allowances. 

In the morning, when our class met in the old 
assembly room, six fellows were marvelously quiet and 



AGGIE LIFE. 



95 



expectant, so much so, in fact, that the fellows began 
quizzing us, but we were silent. We listened 
impatiently to the first speakers, and when Jim's name 
was called, we held our breath. He shuffled to the 
platform and turned toward us. There was silence 
for fully a minute. Then he changed. He straightened 
his shoulders ; his eyes flashed ; he spoke — but was 
that Jim's voice ? There was no drawl, every word 
was spoken distinctly, in a clear, firm voice. His 
gestures were in perfect accord with the thoughts. It 
was not our old Jim, but a new being that stood before 
us. 

When he finished there was silence ; then a deafen- 
ing applause. There is no need to go into further 
detail. My experiment was a success. Further 
development of the same idea made a new man of 
Jim. Yes, he's one of my closest friends. His name? 
You have probably heard of Senator B. of M — . Yes, 
the same Jim. Arian. 



ANNUAL DINNER OF THE MASSACHUSETTS 

AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE ALUMNI 

CLUB OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

The annual reunion, business meeting, and banquet 
of the Massachusetts Agricultural College Alumni 
Club of Massachusetts took place at the Quincy 
House, Boston, Jan. 25, 1901, president Frederick G. 
May presiding. An informal reception and business 
meeting was held in the parlors at six o'clock. The 
report of the last reunion was read by clerk Frederick 
W. Davis, '87. Treasurer R. B. Macintosh reported 
a slight unexpended balance in the treasury which it 
was promptly voted to use in defraying the expenses of 
the banquet of 1901. Upon vote of the meeting a 
nominating committee was appointed by the chair to 
retire and draw up a list of officers for the ensuing 
year. During the intermission following C. E. Gor- 
don, representing Aggie Life made a few remarks. 
The committee then reported the following list of 
officers who were elected to serve for the coming 
year: President, Dr. Madison Bunker, D. V. S., '75 ; 
treasurer, Richard B. Macintosh, '86, of Peabody; 
clerk, Franklin Ware Davis, '87, Rosindale, Mass., 
85 Colberg Ave,; directors, Dr. Edward R. Flint, '87, 
Frederick G. May, '82, A. H. Cutter, '94. 

The business meeting concluded, the company 
adjourned to the banquet hall where a bountiful spread 



was prepared. About fifty members and guests 
gathered around the festive board, Frederick G. 
May, '82, presiding. The excellent menu occupied 
everybody until late in the evening. With the first 
course the busy hum of conversation began. Many 
faces were missing whose presence would have greatly 
enlivened some of the groups, but still there seemed 
to be everywhere a thorough enjoyment of the reunion 
of comrades of former days and in the discussion of 
the old life at the college in whose honor and in the 
memory of whose traditions they had come togther. 

The banquet over, the tables were removed and the 
" social deck was cleared for action," a banjo quar- 
tet, led by F. Guy Stanley, 1900, now at the Harvard 
Medical School, furnished instrumental music, while 
everybody talked to his neighbor. To the accompani- 
ment of the quartet, several members, led by Mr. 
Mackintosh, Dr. Woodbury, '89, Mr. James Marsh, 
'87, and Dr. Bunker rendered a number of selections, 
in excellent "tempo," from some college song sheets, 
kindly lent for the occasion. 

President May read a note from President Goodell 
who expressed his regret that he could not be present 
and extended his greeting to all. Letters of regret 
were also received from Dr. Goessman, Dr. Welling- 
ton, Secretary Stockwell of the Board of Agriculture, 
and Governor Crane. Hon. Frank A. Hill, Secretary 
of the Board of Education and Professor S, H. Pea- 
body, were present as guests of the club. 

After an hour of jollity and conversation over the 
cigars President May introduced Dr. Bunker, presi- 
dent elect, who held the attention of the members for 
a few moments. Dr. Bunker said it had been the 
wish of several of the older alumni to have present 
with them that evening some of those who had been 
instructors in the days when they were students at the 
college. He had written to Dr. Goessmann asking 
him to come but the Doctor had replied stating his 
regret that the recent illness prevented him from leav- 
ing home. Dr. Bunker then introduced Professor 
Peabody as one who, as he expressed it, " entered col- 
lege with me." It was explained later, however, that 
the genial doctor entered as freshman when Mr. Pea- 
body came as professor. Professor Peabody was one 
of the early professors at M.A. C. and has since occu- 
pied a professor's chair at the University of Illinois. 
He was connected with the educational department of 



96 



AGGIE LIFE. 



the World's Fair and is now in charge of a similar 
department in the Pan-American exposition st Buffalo. 

Professor Peabody's remarks were chiefly concern- 
ing the pleasant recollections which he had of the 
early years at "Aggie " when he occupied the chair 
of mathematics. His story of " Who played last," is 
perhaps worth repeating. 

" He referred to the fact that it was customary in 
college, to ' try a new man.' He did not escape. A 
joke was passed around in his class one day, and 
raised a general laugh. He waited until the laugh 
was over then called attention to the work in hand by 
saying ' it is a good point, in playing whist, gentlemen, 
to remember who played last.' The recitation pro- 
ceeded." 

" Later came April 1st. On the morning of that 
day Professor Peabody had felt impelled to go to his 
lecture room early. He found it an abode of ' con- 
fusion wore confounded ' everything upside down and 
out of place. On the black board was written ' who 
played last?' " 

" Professor Peabody seems to have been a man of 
of action. He saw the point, but turned it to suit 
himself. He set to work, and at the recitation hour 
the students found the room in ' apple-pie ' order, 
swept and garnished, as it were. On the wall was the 
same query ' who played last ?' " 

Professor Peabody was followed by Secretary Hill 
who spoke briefly in a pleasant vein. 



A SOCIAL EVENT. 

An informal social gathering, arranged by a com- 
mittee consisting of delegates from each fraternity, 
was held in the Chapel, Friday evening, January 18th. 
A large number of students, several of ihe professors 
and ladies of the faculty, and a large company of in- 
vited guests were present. The event was in every 
way successful. 

The early part of the evening v/as spent in a pleas- 
ant social way ; the company was then treated to a 
brief, but delightful entertainment which the com- 
mittee had provided. After one or two selections by 
Mr. Kinney, '02, rendered on the Chapel organ, and 
a solo by Mr. Allen, '04, Miss Helena Goessmann 
entertained an appreciative audience with a most de- 
lightful narrative of some of her experiences while 
traveling in England and on the Continent. 



From early childhood, it had been her longing to 
visit London. The opportunity came. The long 
voyage across the Atlantic was soon ended and the 
travelers found themselves on the historic soil of 
England. The London of her dreams, and the great 
metropolis which she visited were two quite different 
things. Perhaps not the least pleasant recollections 
of the great city are those of the people whom she 
met there. At an afternoon tea to which she was 
invited it was her pleasure and good fortune to meet 
the Duchess of York. This charming lady attracted 
her attention by the simplicity of her manner and her 
dress. The Duchess paid a high tribute to the beauty 
and sterling qualities of American women. Miss 
Goessmann was everywhere impressed by the sim- 
plicity of dress among the women whom she met. 
She saw the beautiful Queen of Holland, " a repeti- 
tion of Queen Victpria," and witnessed the very pretty 
incident of the Queen waving her hand at some chil- 
dren who had succeeded in attracting her ladyship's 
attention. England she characterized as full of new 
experiences. 

From England the travelers crossed the Channel 
into Holland, "a new world." From Holland they 
went to Paris where they arrived while the city was 
in the high pitch of excitement which accompanied 
the Dreyfus trial. Bulletins concerning the trial 
could be seen everywhere. Our speaker felt that 
Dreyfus might perhaps be guilty, and that though 
many might go unpunished who were deserving of 
punishment quite as much as he, yet there was no 
excuse on that account for pardoning his conduct. 
She believed that the approaching Paris Exposition 
was the means of keeping down another violent French 
revolution. 

From France they went to Switzerland. In this 
delightful country, in a pretty Swiss village, they saw 
the play of William Tell. It was not unlike the Pas- 
sion Play, and the parts were taken by the country 
people. The play is carried on in summer for the 
pleasure of travelers. It is very attractive and the 
music is very beautiful. The performance and a 
moonlight ride upon a charming lake, which reminded 
the travelers of Venice, made up for the miserable 
hotel accommodations which they were obliged to 
endure. 

On visiting Germany it was a surprise and a pleas 



AGGIE LrlFE, 



97 



ure to find the English language very widely spoken. 
It was Miss Goessmann's pleasure to attend a tea 
given by some Russian, Austrian, and German ladies 
at which English was wholly the language of conver- 
sation, and it was Miss Goessmann's comment that 
seldom had she heard better English spoken in our 
own drawing-rooms. The foreign ladies were some- 
what surprised to learn that the education of Ameri- 
can women was not altogether that they might put 
that education to practical use. 

In relating of Emperor William our speaker referred 
to him as not the extreme autocrat that many Amer- 
icans seemed inclined to consider him, but rather as 
a serious man with the best interests of his people at 
heart, and as one beloved by them. 

She had a pretty story to tell of how Christmas is 
observed in Dresden and of the celebration of Carni- 
val time in Munich. Grand and imposing balls con- 
stitute the festivities of the Carnival time. The peo- 
ple are carried away by the excitement and often 
pawn their household necessities that they may secure 
the necessary means to attend the balls. 

The extravagance which the Americans and Eng- 
lise have brought into Dresden is wanting in Munich, 
and living expenses in the latter city are compara- 
tively low. 

Miss Goessmann expressed herself as not so fav- 
orably impressed by the Paris Exposition as by the 
World's Fair. The buildings were all Parisian or of 
French architecture. Unbounded extortion was prac- 
ticed at every opportunity. After visiting the exposi- 
tion the travelers set sail for America. The trip had 
been a pleasant one, the sail delightful, but as they 
sailed in Boston harbor there was a feeling that half 
the pleasure of traveling is in getting back home. 

After Miss Goessmann had finished the company 
listened to a solo by Mr. Staples, '04. Refreshments 
followed,afier which the gathering broke up. 



ANIMAL LIFE ON THE COAST OF CALI- 
FORNIA. 

On Friday evening, Jan. 25, Charles B. Wilson, 
professor of Zoology at the Westfield Normal School, 
gave a very interesting and instructive illustrated lec- 
ture in the Chapel, his subject being, "Animal Life 
on the Coast of California." He spent the summer 



of 1900 on the California coast making a special 
study of Nemertine worms. 

He began his study at Pacific Grove, situated 
across the harbor from Monterey, and about one hun- 
dred and twenty-five miles south of San Francisco. 
Here he had private rooms at the Marine Laboratory. 
The beach near which it was situated was one of the 
best strips of shore on the California coast for zoolog- 
ical research as well as social enjoyment. Pacific 
Grove is known as the Newport of the Pacific coast, 
and every summer hundreds of people go there to 
enjoy the excellent bathing and boating. The 
shore there is exceedingly valuable to the zoologist on 
account of its low, rocky formation which is left well 
exposed at low tide. It is the only good strip of this 
sort on the coast. 

The lobster found there is not so large as the East- 
ern species but is very similar in appearance v/ith the 
exception of the tail which is more like a fin. The 
crabs are very numerous and of a distinct species 
from those on our coast. The sea urchins are the 
same as ours but on the whole they grow much larger. 
The star fish are of a distinct species having "webs " 
between the points of the star and thus they receive 
their name, "Web Armed." The Sun and Basket 
Star-fish are found very plentifully along the coast in 
shallow pools. Sea-cucumbers are much larger than 
our eastern species being, from a foot and a half to 
two feet in length. 

Molluscas are very plentiful along the coast and 
especially near the Marine Laboratory where forty- 
seven different species were found within a radius of 
half a mile. 

Lying around the bottom of the water is found the 
Octopus, a very ugly, disagreeable looking creature 
but perfectly harmless. The sea-anemones are not 
so plentiful as on the Atlantic coast, but are of a vari- 
ety of colors and sizes. 

Passing across the harbor to China Town, just out- 
side Monterey, one finds one of the most interesting 
villages in California. The inhabitants are all Chinese 
who earn their living by fishing. One of the most 
prosperous trades there is the selling of sea urchin 
shells. The men engaged in this business build stag- 
ings around the roof of their houses and, after being 
cleaned, the shells are put there to dry. The shells 



98 



AGGIE LIFE. 



are sold to manufacturers who make them into combs 
and other articles which are generally made of shell. 
The Chinamen sometimes receive orders as large as 
three thousand and as there is very little expense in 
gathering the shells they generally make a good deal 
out of these sales. Others are engaged in fishing for 
squid. Their boats are very similar to the eastern 
dory excepting that they are pointed at both ends. 
They generally go fishing at night and catch their 
fish by aid of a " jack-light." They take the squid, 
cut them open and tear out the entrails, then they 
place them in the fields to dry, after which they are 
thrown into dirty bags, tramped upon by the bare- 
footed Chinamen, and shipped to China where they 
are considered a delicacy. The egg cases are larger 
than the squid itself. After a storm, some of the 
larger ones, weighing sometimes about thirty pounds, 
are blown ashore. 

The Horned Toad is used here by the Chinaman 
as a fever medicine. The skin of the toad is stretched 
over a wooden frame and when any one has a fever, 
they stick the tail of the toad in a pot of earth and 
burn ten incense wafers. If this does not relieve the 
sick person, they grind up the toad and eat it, after 
which they engage in prayer. This last operation is 
always known to kill or cure. 

The Chimasra Monstrosa, or rat fish, is found here 
and is the missing link between the cartilaginous and 
bony fish. It lays its eggs in cases similar to our 
shark, excepting that the case of the rat fish has frills 
on one end of it. 

The fish known as the "Grunter" is another inter- 
esting form of animal life found here. The mother 
fish, instead of laying her eggs in a sensible manner, 
as other fish do, lays them on the under side of a 
rock and then goes away and never comes back. 
The male fish stays around watching the young fish 
until they are old enough to take care of themselves, 
then he leaves for parts unknown. 

Passing back to Monterey, one finds a town, full of 
Curiosities. It is one of the oldest towns in California 
and was first settled by the Spanish. The houses are 
constructed mostly of mud and there seems to be 
but little signs of advancement. Monterey was the 
first capital of California and many of the old govern- 
ment buildings are now used for public purposes. It is 
also the whaling headquarters of California. All the 



whalers, before starting off on their four years' trip, 
come there to fit out their whaling kit. In the center 
of the town is one of the prettiest hotels in the world. 
It is built in the form of a hollow square and both the 
Court and Park surrounding the hotel are covered 
with every variety of shrubs, trees and plants. 

Going north to the Columbia river one would find 
the greatest interest centered in fishing for sturgeon 
and salmon. The fishermen cannot catch these fish 
fast enough with hook and line to satisfy the demands 
of the market, so they do their fishing by a mechani- 
cal method. Four large arms of wood are made in 
the form of a paddle wheel and covered with nets and 
then they are placed on the front of a mud scow 
which is taken out into the stream and anchored. 
The current being quite swift turns the nets toward 
the boat and as the fish are always trying to get up 
stream to lay their eggs, they swim into these nets and 
are caught. The fish are very plentiful and a catch 
of fifty is considered a poor days' work. 

Going back to Los Angeles one will find the Cen- 
tral Park of great interest on account of its vast 
beauty and wealth of palms and flowers. The ave- 
nues are very beautiful, both sides being lined with 
the same kind of plants ; some with umbrella trees 
and others with palms. 

Just outside the city is a famous ostrich farm where 
there are over one hundred birds. Most of them are 
kept in separate pens. Two of the finest ostriches 
there are Bill and Mrs. McKinley who are very valu- 
able to the owners on account of the excellence of 
their feathers. The young ostrich, unlike other young 
birds, cannot stand when first it leaves its shell, and 
not until it is thirty-six hours old, can it get around on 
its feet and then it finds great difficulty in keeping its 
balance. The older ostrich is a remarkably strong 
bird and is noted for its powerful limbs. The keepers 
often mount these birds and ride them around the 
grounds for pleasure. The plucking of these birds is 
a very hard and dangerous piece of work. It causes 
the bird great pain to have a feather pulled out and 
were it not for the hood which is placed over its head, 
it would be almost impossible to hold it. When a 
bird is first plucked, only the scraggly feathers are 
taken out and then better ones grow in their place. 

All the slides exhibited were taken by Prof. Wilson 
and showed his great skill in photography. After the 



AGGIE LIFE. 



99 



lecture he exhibited several specimens which he had 
collected in California among which were the Chimera 
Monstrosa, Grunter, Tarantella, Horned Toad, Squid, 
Sea Urchin, Basket and Web-Armed Star Fish. 

A. 



,\l 



— Index 1902. 

— Junior Prom. Feb. 13. 

— Gates, 1902, has recovered from an attack of 
la grippe. 

— Blake, 1902, is confined to his room with 
measles. 

— Invitations, tickets, prelims., etc., for the prom, 
can be procured from " Iky " Rice. 

— President Goodell has recovered from a recent 
attack of the grippe and is now in Washington. 

— Dr. Walker gave a talk on "Eloquence" before 
the Shakespearean club, Saturday evening, the 19th. 

— The Sophomores held their class supper at the 
Bloody Brook house, South Deerfield, on January 17. 

— Professor Tyler of Amherst college recently 
spoke before the members of the Shakespearean club. 

— Allen and Kinney gave several selections at the 
musicale given at the Amherst house. Thursday even- 
ing, the 17th. 

— There will be a meeting of the Chemical Club 
Monday evening, Feb. 18. Professor Howard will 
talk on Victor Meyer. 

— Victor A. Gates, '02, has been elected to fill to 
fill the vacancy made by the resignation of A. L 
Dacy on The Life board. 

— R. H. Robertson, '02, has been elected to the 
Aggie Life Board to fill the vacancy caused by the 
resignation of C. L. Tinker, 

— Prof. R. S. Lull gave an illustrated lecture be- 
fore the Springfield Zoological club, Friday, Feb. 1st. 
His subject was " Dinosaurs." 

— Claflin, Dellea, Bodfish, Co. A., and Saunders 
Co. B. have received corporal appointments. Allen 
has been transferred to Co. B. 

— Prof. F. S. Cooley, Instructor Barnes, and 
Charles Trow attended the Connecticut dairymens' 
meeting in Hartford on the 15th. 



— The patronesses for the Junior Prom, are: Mrs. 
Goodell, Mrs. Ostrander, Mrs. Lull, Mrs. Paige, Mrs. 
Stone, Mrs. Fernald, and Mrs. Babson. 

— Capt Anderson's recent remark that " To to be 
in style you have to have the grippe," seems to be 
justified by the number of cases reported in College. 

— The Freshmen have elected the following offi- 
cers : Pres't, Handy; vice pres't, Pease; sec'y and 
treas., Graves ; basketball captain, White; sergeant- 
at-arms, Kirby. 

— Professor W. P. Brooks attended the banquet 
and reunion of the m.embers of the Mass. Agr'l Col- 
lege Alumni club of Massachusetts, held at the 
Quincy House, Boston, January 25fh. 

— The evening of the fifteenth witnessed a highly 
entertaining snowball fight and rush between the 
Freshmen and Short Course men. The latter, being 
disturbed during an agricultural controversy by the 
entrance of snowballs and various other missiles 
through the windows, unlocked the door and made a 
sortie, only to be met by a volley of snowballs that 
did dire damage in the way of black eyes; but the 
followers of Agricola met the missiles bravely and 
hastened to retrieve the debt in kind. At twenty 
paces both sides hurled snowballs with such rapidity 
that the space between the writhing black masses of 
combatants was a white streak. The Freshmen next 
charged their adversaries; formed again andrecharged. 
As the " Shorties " weakened other classmen joined 
their ranks, thus the contest was made to continue 
interesting. The staid and sober seniors then stopped 
the battle and bade the warriors be gone. Having 
pulled themselves together aod collected stray gar- 
ments these doughty upholders of Mars retired like 
lambs to the rest they so well merited. 



WORLD WIDE WORK OF THE YOUNG MEN'S 
CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

The illustrated lecture given in the Chapel last 
Thursday evening by Mr. J. A. Dummett, Secretary 
of the State Committee of Massachusetts and Rhode 
Island, proved highly interesting and instructive. Mr. 
Dummett has been in association work for the past 
fifteen years, nine of which he spent in the Pacific 
North West as Traveling Secretary. His work has 
taken him abroad as well as to nearly all parts of his 
own country, and during these travels he has collected 



lOO 



AGGIE LIFE 



views of association work, buildings and workers from 
all parts of the globe. 

Mr. Dummett opened his talk by giving an ideal of 
magnitude of the World Wide Work to-day. Then 
he told of the inception of the organization. One man 
George F, Williams, gathered around himself eleven 
other clerks from the store in which he was employed 
and from this little group of a dozen consecrated, 
enthusiastic christians has grown the organization 
which to-day numbers its members by the hundreds 
of thousands. At the fiftieth anniversary of the asso- 
ciation celebrated in London in 1894, George Williams 
was knighted by Queen Victoria for the noble work 
which he had done for young men. 

The first association in this country was organized 
in Boston in 1857 and in celebration of its semicenten- 
nial anniversary a great Jubilee International Conven- 
tion will be held in Boston from June 11 to 16, 1901. 

The work in cities has yielded results which so appeal 
to solid business men that they are ready to invest 
thousands of dollars in erecting buildings and providing 
equipments and means for carrying on this work for 
young men and many of these men have testified that 
this investment in manhood was the best paying invest- 
ment they could make of their wealth. 

Particular emphasis was given to the college asso- 
ciation work. A number views were shown of buildings 
which have been erected expressly for and are entirely 
devoted to this work. Mr. Dumimett showed that the 
Young Men's Christian Association constituted the 
greatest undergraduate student fraternity in the world, 
numbering over 33,000 members in this country alone. 

The railroad work has also pushed rapidly to the 
front and now numbers more members than do the 
college associations. 

The recent development of the work among soldiers 
and sailors was described and pictures were given 
showing even better than words could do how much 
the soldiers appreciate and use the opportunities for 
reading and writing and for social, homelike amusements 
which are placed before them by the Young Men's 
Christian Association. 

Mr. Dummett closed with a strong appeal to '-put 
first things first.''' and to put into our Christian service 
the same earnestness of purpose, enthusiasm and self- 
sacrifice that we give to other college duties of less 
vital importance, 



COUNCIL OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL 
SOCIETY. 

(Communicated.) 

The Council of the American Chemical Society, at 
its meeting in New York City, June 25th, 1 900, decided 
to celebrate the twenty-fifth anniversary of its founda- 
tion which will occur on the 5th of April 1901. The 
President of the Society, Professor William McMurtrie 
of New York City, was authorized and directed to 
appoint a committee, of which he himself should be 
the chairman, to arrange for the celebration of the 
event. The committee of arrangements, appointed 
him in conformity with the action taken by the 
Council upon the subject, consists of thirty-three 
members of the Society with Professor McMurtrie as 
President and Professor Albert C. Hale as Secretary 
of the Committee. 

Dr. C. A. Goessmann, who has been appointed a 
member of the committee of arrangements for the 
celebration of the anniversary has also been made a 
member of a committee of five on History to serve in 
connection with the celebration of the 25th anniver- 
sary of the foundation of the society. The American 
Chemical Society has gradually grown from a sectional 
into a national society with a membership of more 
than eighteen-hundred. The society is,to-day,thorough- 
ly organized for efficient work. Their work includes 
well edited monthly Chemical Journal containing a 
a record of chemical investigation carried on at home 
and a brief review of foreign publications in the various 
fields of chemistry. Any information regarding the 
management of the society, as far as requirements of 
membership etc. are concerned, may be secured by 
applying to Albert C. Hale secretary of the American 
Chemical Society, 551 Putnam Avenue, Brooklyn, N. 
Y. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES. 

Since this is the first appearance of this new de- 
parture on the part of the Life, a few words of ex- 
planation as to its nature and probable scope may not 
be amiss. In the past, the work of the different de- 
partments of our College has received no particular 
attention, simply being reported from time to time in 
a haphazard, makeshift sort of fashion, or else being 
neglected altogether. It was thought that a change 
in this particular would be advisable in many ways. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



lOI 



Accordingly this column of "Department Notes" 
was established. Its aim will be to report as fully as 
possible the work that is being carried on by the Col- 
lege ; as for instance, the experiments constantly un- 
der way at the Station, the additions to the various 
museums, as well as the progress of the routine work 
of the several departments. It is no exaggeration to 
say that fully half of the time the students do not 
know what is going on here outside of their own nar- 
row circle. Information which will obviate some of 
this lack of knowledge ought, it would seem, to be of 
some slight interest and value to the student body ; 
whereas it certainly ought to appeal to the alumni and 
all others who may be interested in the welfare and 
growth of the College. It needless to say that the 
space limits render it impossible to give detailed ac- 
counts of each line of work in every issue ; but it is 
hoped in time to reach them all. To do this the co- 
operation of those in charge is earnestly requested. 
The entire project is, in fact, more or less of an ex- 
periment ; and the continuance or discontinuance of 
the column will depend in great measure upon the 
success or failure which it may attain. 

THE SHORT WINTER COURSES. 

During the winter term, m.ore or less interest at- 
taches itself to the short winter courses offered by 
the College. In recent years the attendance has not 
been what it should, and the usefulness of the courses 
has been seriously hampered thereby. This year, 
however, the courses received better and more 
general advertising than ever before and the results 
are correspondingly gratifying. Thirty. three men 
have been enrolled, besides several men from the 
four-year's course who are taking a portion of the 
work. 

The mosr popular of these courses appears as us- 
ual to be that of dairy farming. Three divisions of 
ten men each have been formed, besides the division 
from the Senior class in Agriculture which has work 
on Saturday mornings. In the dairy school. Prof. 
Cooley continues to have charge of the work in test- 
ing. Mr. Trow, of last year's class is at the head of 
the separator division and Mr. Barnes of Iowa State 
college is instructor in butter making. Considerable 
new apparatus has been secured in both the separa- 
tor and churning room and the work is progressing as 
well as could be expected. 



Twenty-seven men are taking Horticulture, fifteen 
Entomology, six Chemistry, three Zoology and two 
Veterinary. The short course men are better organ- 
ized than ever before. A debating-club and a basket- 
ball team have been formed, and other symptoms of 
an unheard-of activity are manifest. 



Editor of Aggie Life. 

(Communicated.) 

With your permission, I would like to express the 
feelings of probably several men about college re- 
specting a matter which is becoming more and more 
aggravating. I refer to the removal of periodicals 
from the Reading Room by those who have no 
authority to do so. 

At the beginning of the college year, an auction of 
the periodicals of the Reading Room was held. It is 
possible that some men bid off such publications 
solely for the benifit of the organization. Others in- 
cluding mj'self, purchased them also for the sake of 
securing them after they had served the college pub- 
lic. Certain rules are laid down as I understand, 
limiting and controlling the rights and subscribers to 
the Reading Room. This set of rules does not, I 
believe, allow any member to appropriate any publi- 
cation on file simply on the ground that it suits him 
to do so or because he needs its help in writing an 
essay. When the new magazine or newspaper ap- 
pears, the old one is no longer the property of the 
Reading Room, much less of promiscuous sub- 
scribers. It belongs to the man v/ho bought and paid 
for it in open competition. No man who cares for 
the reputation of the College or who is a believer in 
fair play will lower himself by confiscating the property 
or by using the privileges of others for his own selfish 
ends. 

Probably there is no redress for those who suffer 
from these petty pilferings, but college opinion and 
censure should be so strongly and openly shown 
toward such action that it will not be politic for any 
person to commit them. It does not need a great 
amount of foresight to see that eventually these mat- 
ters, if merely smiled at, will react to the detriment 
of the entire student body. 



370 of the 472 colleges in this country have an 
enrollment of less than 150 students. 



102 



AGGIE LIFE 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

Eben Holden, by Irving Bacheller. This is an in- 
teresting story much after the same type as •' David 
Harum.," although I thinly it a Httie ahead of that 
book. It is the story of a boy who was taken by an 
old man from his home in Vermont, to escape the 
poorhouse, and carried into one of the pleasant valleys 
of western New York. A well-to-do family took pity 
on the pair and gave them a home making them 
members of the family. The boy is the hereof the story 
but the old man takes a very important position in the 
carrying out of the plot ; his conversation and remarks 
are always amusing aud instructive and what he says 
is invariably to the point. 

Master Christian, by Marie Corelli. By many 
authorities this book is considered to be the strongest 
of Marie Corelli's productions, and perhaps it merits 
such praise but to a great many it would not be a 
congenial book. In the first place the opening chap- 
ters are rather tedious which would discourage the 
average reader at the outset, but who ever has 
patience with the author will think himself well repaid 
for his efforts before the conclusion of the story is 
reached. The plot is good and it is well carried out ; 
the sentences are well formed and the style is gener- 
ally clear. 

The number of town and city histories is continually 
increasing. Those of Dorchester and Hubbardston 
have lately been added. 

The following are scientific works : 

The Second Law of Thermodynamics, Memoirs by 
Carnot, Clausius and Thompson, translated and edited 
by W. F. Magie. Ph. D., Professor of Physics in 
Princeton university. After the invention of the 
steam engine in its present form Carnot examined 
the relations between heat and the work done by heat 
and established the condition upon which the econom- 
ical working of all heat-engines depends. Later his 
theories were taken up and more fully developed and 
carried out by both Clausius and Thompson, who pub- 
lished their results at the time. The science of 
Thermodynamics founded by these three men has 
led to the most important developments in all depart- 
ments of physical science. 

The Social Law of Service, by Richard T. Ely, Ph. 
D., LL. D., professor of Political Economy in the 
University of Wisconsin. The subject discussed is a 



very important one and as the author says, " Deals 
with topics belonging to that borderland in which 
theology, ethics and economics meet. It is in this 
borderland that the problems of life present themselves 
to us." 

Prismatic and Diffraction Spectra, Memoirs by 
Joseph Von Franenhofer, translated and edited by J. 
S. Ames, Ph. D., professor of Physics in Johns Hop- 
kins university. The spectrum of the sun was first 
observed in 1666 by Newton. In 1814 Franenhofer, 
working independently, rediscovered the lines in the 
solar spectrum, which had been first observed by 
Wollaston in 1802, and they now bear his name. 
This volume is made up of the papers in which he 
describes his work. Franenhofer accomplished a 
great deal along this line of investigation and the great 
merit of his work as some one has told us is "the sys- 
tematic, logical method by which he proceeds from 
investigation to investigation." All modern work in 
spectroscopy is based upon that of Franenhofer. 



If it happens that some of the items in this column 
are unduly late in coming to print we humbly beg the 
indulgence of our alumni and most sincerely hope 
that with the help of the alumni in sending in their 
items, and with the consent of the publishers, this 
undue delay will not occur again. 

'78. — Charles S. Howe has prepared a paper on 
the subject, " The Case Almucantar " which appeared 
in the Astronomical Journal of December 29th, 1900. 

'82. — W. H. Thurston, who went to the Klondike 
in search of gold died of pneumonia at Cape Nome 
last August. 

'88. — W. M. Shepardson, of Middlebury, Conn., 
spent a few days in town recently. 

'89. — R. P. Sellew, General sale agent for the 
Marsden Company. This company makes the Corn- 
Armor plates. Address 850 Drexel Building, Phila. 

'92. — E. T. Clark, superintendent for J. Montgom- 
ery, Southborough. 

'92.— J. L. Field, No. 3017 Prairie Ave., Chicago, 
111, 

'92. — Wm. Fletcher, Chelmsford, Mass. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



103 



'92.— I. G. Stockbridge, Harrison, N. Y. 

'92.— G. B. Willard, Waltham, Mass. 

'92.— H. C. West, Waltham, Mass. 

Ex. -'93. — W. H. Ranney married to Miss Susie 
Billings, January 1, 1901. 

'93. — Dr. E. H. Lehnert of Clinton was in town 
recently. 

'94. — Halley M. Fowler, railway mail clerk be- 
tween Boston and New York, recently spent a few 
days in town. 

'94. — J. H. Putnam spent a few days in town re- 
cently visiting friends. 

Class OF '95. 

Wright A. Root* Milk Dealer, 3 Brewster Court, 
Northampton, Mass. 

Arthur B. Smith, Book-keeper with Wilson Bros., 
Wholesale Men's Furnishings, Chicago, 111. Address, 
544 Winnemac Ave., Ravenswood, Chicago. 

Clarence L. Stevens*, Farmer, Sheffield, Mass. 

Maurice J. Sullivan**, Farm Superintendent Little- 
ton, N. H. 

Fred C. Tobey, Teacher Physics and Chemistry, 
Mt. Pleasant Academy, Sing Sing, N. Y. 

Stephen P. Toole*, Amherst, Mass. 

Franklin L. Warren, Physician, King's Co. Hospi- 
tal, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Edward A. White, Asst. Horticulturist, State Col- 
lege of Agriculture and Mechanics of Texas, College 
Station, Texas. 

Henry A. Ballou*, Asst. Prof. Botany and Forestry 
and Com. Cadets, Connecticut Agricultural College, 
Storrs, Conn. 

Waldo L. Bemis, with Prouty Boot & Shoe Co., 
Spencer, Mass. 

Geo. A. Billings*, Instructor in Natural Science, 
Baron de Hirsch, Agricultural and Industrial School, 
Woodbine, N. J. 

William C. Brown, Salesman, wall paper and in- 
terior decorations, 51 Cornhill Boston. Address, 
Peabody, Mass. 

Albert F, Burgess, Asst. Inspector Nurseries and 
Orchards, Ohio Agricultural Expt. Sta., Wooster, 
Ohio. 

Harry E. Clark, Dairyman, Bisco Farm, Middle- 
bury, Conn. 



Edile H. Clark, Brookfield, Mass. 

Robert A. Cooley*, Prof. Zoology and Entomology, 
Montana State College, Bozeman, Mont. 

Chas, W. Crehore, Farmer and Dairyman, Chico- 
pee, Mass. 

Chas. M. Dickinson*, Seedsman and Florist, 76-78 
Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Herbert S. Fairbanks, Tutor. Hanover, Germany. 

Harold L. Frost, Entomologist and dealer in Ento- 
mologists' Supplies, Arlington, Mass. 

Thomas P. Foley, Teacher Mathematics and 
Physics, St. Austin's School, West New Brighton, 
N. Y. 

Herbert D. Hemenway, Director and Instructor in 
Horticulture, Handicraft Schools of Hartford, Conn. 

Robert S. Jones, Asst. Engineer, Metropolitan 
Water Board. Address, 3 Cambridge Terrace, Alls- 
ton, Mass. 

Shiro Kuroda, Utsubo Kitadori, Osako, Japan. 

Clarence B. Lane, Asst. in Dairy Husbandry, N. J. 
Expt. Sta., New Brunswick, N. J. 

Henry W. Lewis*, Park Dept., Office of City Engi- 
neer, Havana, Cuba. 

Jasper Marsh, with Marsh Bros., Real Estate, 
Insurance and General Brokers, Danvers, Mass. 

Walter L. Morse, Engineering Dept., N. Y. N. H. 
& H. R. R. Address, Middleboro, Mass. 

Daniel C. Potter*, Landscape and Sanitary Engi- 
neer, Farmington, Conn. 

*Married. 
**Won class cup. 

'96. — Horace Burrington is doing special work in 
agriculture un^er Professor Brooks at the Hatch Ex- 
periment Station. 

'96. — Frank L. Clapp, care Metropolitan Water 
Board, 1 Ashburton Place, Boston. 

'96. — Asa S. Kinney of South Hadley spent a short 
time in town recently, inspecting the apparatus in the 
Botanical Labratory. 

'96. — B. K. Jones has resigned his position in the 
Utah Experiment Station to accept a position as New 
England agent for the American Milling Co. of 
Chicago, 111. 

'96. — A. B. Cook has become the fond possessor 
of a son. 

Ex-'96. — H, W. Rawson was married on Jan. 14, 



104 



AGGIE LIFE. 



to Miss Martha Griffin of Annisquam, Mass., at 6 
o'clock p. M. by the bride's uncle of New York. After 
a three weeks' trip to the Bermudas, they will occupy 
a newly-fitted house on Broadway, Arlington, Mass. 
Mr. Rawson is now a member of the firm of W. W. 
Rawson & Co., Boston Seedsmen. 

'97. — Geo. D. Leavens, of Grafton, is the happy 
possessor of a daughter. 

'97. — H. F. Armstrong spent a week in town re- 
cently. 

'98. — S. W. Wiley is collecting Paris green for the 
Hatch Experiment Station in the vicinity of Worces- 
ter and Boston. 

'98. — V/. S. Fisher v/as in town recently. 

Henry B. Read*, Farmer and Fruit Grower, West- 
ford, Mass. 

'99. — W. H. Armstrong is in charge of the indus- 
trial training in San Juan, Porto Rico. Address, 
Care of Insular Board of Education, San Juan, Porto 
Rico. 

'99. — M. H. Pingree of the Pennsylvania Experi- 
ment Station, spent the Christmas vacation in Am- 
herst. 

'99. — C. M. Walker has been appointed assistant 
in the office of the State Entomologist at Albany, 
New York, and will assist in the preparation of the 
State's Entomological exhibit at the Pan- American 
Exposition at Buffalo. 

Ex-'99. — E. H. Sharpe is now in Connecticut 
employed in boring artesian wells. 

'00. — F. G. Stanley of the Harvard Medical 
School is playing a leading part in the Harvard College 
banjo club. 



TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN. 

Amherst, Mass., February 1, 1901. 
The '02 Index is at last published ; late, but all the 
better for being late. Don't fail to procure a copy, all 
you who are interested in " Old Aggie." $1.25 insures 
the delivery, to any address, of a Year Book that every 
Alumnus of M. A. C. would be glad to possess. 

R. W. Morse, Business Manager. 



Tufts is to establish a school of political and legal 
science, for the study of statesmanship and diplomacy. 



isi'tercolle^Sa'tf . 



The catalogue of Boston university shows a total 
registration of 1346 divided as follows: College of 
Liberal Arts. 495 ; College of Law, 343 ; College of 
Agriculture, 165; College of Theology, 151, and Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences, 1 10. 

The National Board of Education reports that one 
out of every forty college graduates now living has at- 
tained frecognized distinction of some sort in the 
country : and that but one in every ten thousand, not 
receiving the benefits of such higher education, has 
attained similar success. 

The projected movement to include a parade of 
students from the American colleges in the inaugural 
exercises of next March, has resulted in more or less 
of a fiasco. Practically every reputable college has 
declined to participate, on the ground that it would be 
a needless diversion from the regular work. The 
scheme will undoubtedly be abandoned. 

Intense interest has centered of late in the investi- 
gations of hazing at West Point. Many instances of 
harsh and cruel treatment were given, and the testi- 
mony brought out numerous facts which proved the 
existence of a spirit, exemplified by the so-called 
" code of honor," which is entirely foreign to the non- 
military colleges. The recommendations of the in- 
vestigating committees are eagerly awaited. There 
is some chance that the Congressional investigation 
wtll be extended to the U. S. Naval academy as well, 
since certain stories in circulation aver that a state of 
affairs exists there quite as bad as that at West 
Point. 



'9 



DRAWING AND BLUE PROCESS PAPERS, 

SCALES, ANGLES, CURVES and T SQUARES, 

ARCHITECTS' AND DRAFTMEN'S COLORS, 

SCHOOL BOXES WATER COLORS, 



INCORPORATED, 
82 and 84 Washiugton St., \-Rn«Tnv 
216aud218 Clarendon St., / ^'^^-^^^^• 



Factories, MALDBN, MASS. 




IE LIFE. 



VOL. XI. 



AMHERST. MASS., FEBRUARY 20, 190L 



NO. 9 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will be sent 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

CLARENCE EVERETT GORDON, 1901, Editor-in-Chief. 
NATHAN DAVIS WHITMAN, 1901, Business Manager. 
LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, 1902, Assistant Business Manager. 

Assistant Editors. 

CHARLES LESLIE RICE, 1901. 
THOMAS CASEY, 1901. 
CHARLES MILTON KINNEY, 1902. 
RICHARD HENDRIC ROBERTSON, 1903. 



JAMES HENRY CHICKERING, 1901. 
HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT. 1902. 
VICTOR ADOLPH GATES. 1902. 
NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN, 1903. 



Terms: $1.00 per gear in adcance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside of United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 
Foot-Ball Association, 
Collegfe Boarding Club, 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

G. R. Bridgeforth, Pres. Athletic Association, 
C. L. Rice, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

J. H. ChickeringSec. Nineteen Hundred and Two Index, 

Reading-Room, C. T. Leslie, Secretary. 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
C. L. Rice, Manager. 
R. W, Morse, Manager. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



Edi-torials. 



It is generally conceded that the Junior Prom, was 
a brilliant success. To say that a mid-winter event 
of this kind is needed as much as it is enjoyed may 
be a comparison of two dissimilar things, yet it will 
serve as a forcible though ungrammatical way of 
placing a true value on " the necessity of an indispen- 
sable thing;" for certainly nothing can serve so well 
in estimating that value as the pleasure and enjoy- 
ment which are derived from this social event. 



possibly it has been fully discussed ; we are sure, 
however, that the article will prove interesting reading 
to many. 



We take the liberty of publishing in another column 
a communication to which we v/ish to call the atten- 
tion of our readers, as setting forth some suggestive 
ideas regarding agricultural education as it is carried 
on in Germany. Whether or no such a plan, as is 
suggested in the article referred to, would be feasible 
here in Massachusetts would have to be determined 
by experiment. Perhaps the idea is not new and 



A GOOD deal of interest has been manifested in the 
fate of the bill now before the legislature, calling for 
an appropriation for repairs and for making additions 
to some of the departments. The portion of the bill 
relating to repairs and additions was redrafted and 
presented to the committee on waj^s and means. 
This committee has recommended it to the house by 
which it was passed to be engrossed last week. It is 
now before the senate. It was thought best by those 
in charge to wait another year before asking for an 
appropriation for a new boarding-house. Next year, 
if everything goes well, an appropriation will be asked 
for. We think there need be no apprehension that a 
new boarding-house will not be considered. If the 
visit of the members of the legislative committee 
who visited the College on a tour of inspection Janu- 
ary last does not bear good fruit then the College 



io6 



AGGIE LIFE. 



might as well give up the ghost. The delay is sim- 
ply one of expediency ; the College must have a build- 
ing which shall be creditable not only to itself but also 
to the State, and when a new boarding-house is built 
we believe that It will be a structure of which we 
shall nowise have occasion to be ashamed. 



Literature, art, poetry, travel, science, questions 
of political interest, and an hundred and one topics of 
importance and interest to the general public and to 
the student are being reviewed every month by emi- 
nent and distinguished men in our current magazines. 
The articles which appear from time to time on these 
varied subjects in our current periodicals have more 
than a momentary interest ; they have a distinct ref- 
erence value, one which is more and more being 
recognized and appreciated. In the investigation of 
almost every subject which one can imagine the stu- 
dent finds this periodical literature a treasure-house 
of information by means of which he can generally 
get a very comprehensive view of the subject in hand. 
But the value of the source of this information is in 
proportiyn to the readiness and ease with which it 
may be drawn upon. The student must make requi- 
sition upon it : he will be behind the times if he ig- 
nores it and when he is seeing information he usu- 
ally can ill afford to spend the time necessary to wade 
through such a mass of literature as we now have 
upon the shelves of our libraries with only a possibil- 
ity of his meeting with what he seeks. A thorough 
comprehensive index meets the requirement of the 
student ; it furnishes him with a ready means of ac- 
cess to what he must use. We believe the addition 
of a Poole's Index will greatly increase the efficiency 
of our library. The general usefulness which such 
an index will have seems to us to be recommendation 
enough. 



J-tories- 



A CHEMICAL EXPERIMENT. 

A young man was sitting in what was evidently his 
living and sleeping room combined ; his chair was 
tipped back and his feet were perched on the table. 
He was deeply engrossed in a book, which he held in 
his hand, a common briar pipe took up some of his 
attention, as he occasionly put it between his lips and 



then blew a cloud of smoke over the room. As he 
sat he heard somebody tumbling and stumbling up the 
stairway as though in a fearful hurry. On reaching 
the top, the unknown approached the door leading into 
the room of the smoker, and without ceremony burst 
into the room, and, all breathless, shouted in an excited 
voice : 

"Jack, old man, I have solved it at last." 

Good, old man ! Glad to hear it ; you certainly 
deserve success for the work you have put on it. Sit 
down and tell me about it. " 

A few words of explanation will be of interest here. 
John Holden and his friend Fred Carter, were students 
in one of the large colleges ; both had passed their 
undergraduate course together, and are now working 
for higher degrees as post-graduates. They had taken 
up the same studies ; but Fred was particularly inter- 
ested in chemistry and had been. working for months 
trying to solve a chemical problem, that the head pro- 
fessor had set him at work on. Many others in former 
years, had been given the same knot to untangle ; but 
had turned and twisted the snarl in vain. Now Fred 
had accidently hit upon the solution of it. The result 
of his work was of great interest to the world, and was 
of enormous commercial value. 

After Fred had recovered his breath and sat down, 
he began to recite the particulars that led up to the 
discovery. His friend listened with rapt attention, as 
he went over the equations that had led up to it, the 
details of which are of no interest to the reader. 

Holden finally said, " Well, Fred, the next thing you 
must do is to have it patented. You are the one who 
solved the problem, and you should reap the benefits. 
This is one of the greatest discoveries of the century, 
and means that you are a wealthy man. Poverty with 
all its hardships is a thing of the past for you." 

At the end of this speech Fred merely said, "Yes, 
that is so, Jack." and then sat quietly thinking for 
several minutes. Suddenly he jumped up and said, 
" I must go and report to Dr. Shuman, " and then he 
went out. 

He returned a few hours later and found his friend 
still deep in his book. Holden looked up as Fred 
entered. "Well, how did the Doctor take it?" he 
asked. 

" He was greatly surprised at first," said Fred, " but 
j more than delighted with my success. We talked it 



AGGIE LIFE. 



107 



all over, and I explained it to him, as he wanted to 
know the most minute particulars," 

" As I said before, Fred, you had better get it 
patented right away, you can't tell what may happen." 

After Fred had explained the discovery he had made 
to Dr. Shuman, and gone, the Doctor sat thinking for 
a long time. Here was in his grasp the means to 
attain what had been his life's dream. Not only 
unlimited wealth ; but the perpetuating of his name as 
one of the great men of the world — one of the dearest 
desires in the hearts of men. 

Dr. Shuman was at heart a good man, but the 
the temptation before him was too great. He knew 
it was one of the basest crimes imaginable to steal 
what rightly belonged to the young man; but he 
finally gave in to the tempter. That night he worked 
until all the rest of the world seemed asleep, and before 
daybreak he had prepared all the necessary papers to 
have the discovery credited to him, and the first mail 
in the morning carried them on to Washington where 
they were duly entered and recorded. 

Fred deliberately proceeded to make out papers 
similar to the Doctor's, but was several days before he 
had everything completed. A few days after he had 
sent them what was his surprise when they were 
returned to him, with a note from the patent office 
saying that the rights to that discovery had been 
granted to another a few days before the receipt of his 
papers. 

When he showed the letter to his friend, Holden, it 
was in great dispair and disappointment. His friend 
looked surprised and said, "Who could have been 
before you. It seems impossible that two persons 
could have solved the same problem at the same time ; 
but cheer up old man, it may come out all right yet." 

Fred went about his studies for the next few days 
in a dispairing uninteresting way. When he told Dr. 
Shuman of his disappointment, the Doctor sympathized 
with him ; but did not say very much. Fred continued 
his studies and finally secured his degree, He accepted 
a position as a professor in another college ; but the 
loss of the honor of his discovery and the disappoint- 
ment had left their marks on him and he was always 
quiet and thoughtful. Strange to say the name of the 
person who had secured the patent never appeared. 
Whether the Doctor had regretted his act and was too 



cowardly to undo it was never known. The benefits 
of the solution of the problem had been given to the. 
world ; but without the name of the discoverer. 

A few years ago an article appeared in one of the 
scientific magazines giving an account of the tearing 
down of the old laboratory building in which our hero 
had worked. Stored away in a secret compartment 
in the walls were found a number of papers, which 
gave a full account of the discovery and a full confes- 
sion by Dr. Shuman of the part he had played regard- 
ing it. Thus after many years the rightful discoverer 
and owner came into his rightful due. Although he 
never knew during his life of the honors heaped upon 
him in after years yet his name will live forever and 
stands to-day with those of the great men of the world. 



HOW IT ENDED. 

[Competitive.] 

" Mr. Ross you may bring that note to the desk." 

The speaker, a tall, rather dignified looking man, 
whose Prince Albert coat and gold-bowed spectacles 
might have betrayed his vocation, stood on his desk 
platform in the study-room of the Lewisville high 
school, and looked fiercely at a handsome looking boy 
of perhaps eighteen years of age, who occupied one 
of the back seats. 

The latter, whose frank, open countenance would 
have usually isolated him from his companions, now 
showed dismay and chagrin in every feature. He 
moved uneasily in his seat and glanced nervously 
across the narrow aisle where sat a blushing young 
lady, a year or so his junior. On the corner of her 
desk lay the cause of all the trouble ; a portion of a 
leaf torn from a note-book, folded so as to be as com- 
pact as possible and containing — " but that does not 
concern us." 

" Mr, Ross I do not intend to speak again. You 
may bring here the paper you just placed on Miss 
Haskell's desk, or you may interview the school 
committee." 

Arthur Ross knew what that meant. The Lewis- 
ville high school had for some time been 'a. seat of 
lawlessness, and since the last teacher had been in- 
stalled a number of the more unruly element had 
been expelled by the all-powerful committee. He 
knew full well that an interview with that august body 



io8 



AGGIE LIFE. 



would mean the ending of his career in the high 
school. And how he wanted to remain! He would 
graduate in a few months, and for a long time he had 
cherished thoughts of a college education. It meant 
so much to him to stay in school. 

But no, he would rever give that slip of paper to 
the teacher, for it would be read aloud to the whole 
school and Bessie should never be subjected to such 
an humiliation by any act of his. 

Now Bessie Haskell had been his playmate ever 
since he could remember. They lived near together, 
a half mile from the school which they had always 
attended and it was always Arthur's umbrella which 
protected her from the rain, and it was always Arthur 
who carried her lunch basket on the way to and from 
the school. They had entered the high school to- 
gether, and as they grew older, it came about as a 
matter of course that they should attend parties to- 
gether and should be seen in each others' company at 
other socials in the quiet little town. Their school- 
mates had long since ceased to make puns about 
them. And aside from an occasional titter from the 
girls as some new episode came about or a sly jest 
from the boys, which Arthur's sensitive nature quickly 
resented, nothing happened to mar the tranquillity of 
their friendshtp, 

" Mr. Ross I " At that instant Arthur arose to 
his feet, a feeling, something deeper than gallantry 
came to him for the first time. He never realized 
before how much he cared for Bessie and how much 
he was willing to undergo for her sake. He would 
go. He would leave everything before she should be 
subjected to such a disgrace ; but as he started for 
the door, Bessie, flushed and trembling, slipped dov/n 
the aisle and placed upon the Principal's desk a folded 
and crumpled slip of paper. 

" Well, a — Miss Haskell, I think it was not your 
fault, I saw Mr. Ross place this on your desk and you 
know it is against the rules to pass notes. I shall 
have to read it before the school." The principal 
cleared his thront and looked over his glasses to note 
the effect on our young friend. Evidently satisfied 
with the misery he was causing the latter, he slowly 
unfolded the fateful note and read, " We take in Al- 
gebra from page 69 to 72." 

The Principal looked disappointed ; evidently he 
had expected a more startling passage. Arthur Ross 



sank into his seat with a very perplexed but much re- 
lieved expression of countenance. The Principal dis- 
missed the matter in a rather crestfallen way and 
there the incident ended, except that it seemed to 
strengthen the friendship between the two whose only 
thought was of each other and how to foil the principal. 
* * * # * 

In June the two classmates received their diplo- 
mas. That evening when Bessie opened the bouquet 
of roses which accompanied hers, a visiting-card 
dropped to the floor. 

* * * * # 

Arthur Ross, M. D., sat in his cozy office reading 
the evening mail. A beautiful woman entered and 
sat down on the arm of his easy chair. " See what 
I just came across, dear, while looking over some old 
school books I had when I was a girl." She held out 
to him a slip of paper yellow, soiled with age and 
showing plainly the creases where it had been folded. 
And then he read the note which his little classmate 
had so deftly changed for a less guilty one which had 
been passed to her a minute before, one day long 
ago. It read, " Bessie, will you go to the party with 
me to-night ? " and then in less bold letters, as if 
afraid of being seen, " You know I would rather go 
with you than with any other girl." 

Then Dr. Ross's arm stole around the slender 
waist by his side, and he kissed the brave little Bessie 
of his school days. 

W. 



" HOOFS AND CLAWS." 

The third, of the series of illustrated lectures of the 
Natural History Society, was delivered in the chapel, 
Friday evening, February 7, by Professor Lull. His 
subject was " Hoofs and Claws." 

Before the lecture, Mr. Gordon spoke for a few 
minutes on the work of the society, outlining the pro- 
gram for the winter. He then introduced Professor 
Lull. 

The speaker gave various phases of animal life of 
the American continent of the past and present. 
Sketching its succession and sequence from its ap- 
pearance in the Early Eocene up to the present time, 
confining himself mainly to the remarkable discov- 
eries made in the Western territories, where vast 
numbers of bones are buried in wide-spread lacustrine 



AGGIE LIFE. 



log 



beds. Illustrations of the Eocene mammals and 
their descendants of the present day were thrown on 
the screen, and the Professor pointed out and ex- 
plained the connecting links existing between them. 
His subject had mostly to deal with the order, Ungu- 
lata, or hoofed animals, and according with the title 
of his lecture he traced the resemblances and devel- 
opments of the various existing species by means of 
their hoofs and claws, as follows : 

The group Ungulata is divided into two sub-groups : 
Those that are odd-toed, Perisodactyl, and those that 
are even-toed. Artiodactyl. The first includes such 
modern animals as the rhinoceros, tapir, and horse. 
The second, somewhat distinct, the Bunodonts, those 
with mammillated teeth, of which the hog and hippo- 
potamus are types, and the Selenodonts, those with 
cresental plates of enamel in the teeth, of which the 
ruminants, like the deer, ox and camel are examples. 
The most characteristic animals of the lowest Eocene 
belong to the genus Coryphodon, which once abounded 
in America. These animals in their dentition ap- 
proached the American tapirs, except they had great 
canines like the bears, while their feet resembled 
those of the elephant, and some of them attained the 
size of the ox. Another point in which it resembles 
some of its early Tertiary contemporaries is the small 
size of its brain, especially in those parts supposed to 
minister to intelligence and higher instincts. Ani- 
mals thus slow in development of brain were prob- 
ably slow, sluggish and ferocious, dependent on brute 
force for subsistence and defence. 

In the Middle Eocene period the Coryphodon was 
replaced by the Dinoceras and allied forms. Some 
of the species equalled the elephant in size, but had 
shorter and stouter limbs, each supported on five toes, 
the most perfect possible sort of pedestal foot. They 
were heavily armed with immense canines on the 
upper jaws, and two or three pairs of horns. The 
Eocene families have no known successors, and in 
the Miocene age their place is taken by a different 
group, of which Brontotherium is the type. They 
are creatures of huge size, v/ith a pair of horn-cores 
on the nose, and feet with four toes in front and three 
behind, resembling in form those of the rhinoceros. 
Different forms have been found in the Bad Lands 
of the West, proving that the rhinoceros were once 
native American animals. A picture of a huge skel- 



eton of one was shov/n, and a comparison was made 
with the modern animals of same species in foreign 
countries. 

A diminutive ungulata, Eohippus, of the stature of 
a dog was shown. It had four toes and a rudiment 
of a fifth in front, and three toes behind, with teeth 
resembling those of the horse, but simpler and shorter 
in the crown. In this creature it is supposed that we 
have a direct ancestor of the modern horse. Another 
ungulata, Miohippus continues this line, while Proto- 
hippus of the lower Pliocene is still more equine, and 
as large an ass, and corresponds with the European 
Hipparion, in having the middle toe of each foot alone 
long enough to reach the ground. In the upper Pli- 
ocene true horses appear with only a single toe and 
splint bones, instead of the others. Though the horse 
was unknown at the time of the discovery of this con- 
tinent, several remains of species have been found, 
proving that the genus existed here up to a compara- 
tively late period ; what led to its extinction is yet a 
mystery. 

The three groups represented by the horse, rhinoc- 
eros and tapir constitute the whole of the Perisso- 
dactyls, and the two latter forms can be traced back 
to predecessors even more closely resembling them, 
than those supposed to be ancestors of the horse 
resemble that animal. 

The Artiodactyls have gained in numbers and im- 
portance, in comparison with their odd-toed com- 
rades. The typical Artiodactyls are those that cleave 
the hoof, and are of all others the most valuable to 
man. Primitive even-toed species appear with an 
approach to the crescent-shaped teeth of the modern 
deer and oxen. Some of the species are obviously 
forerunners of the modern deer and antelopes, al- 
though destitute of horns and antlers. The earliest 
deer have small and simple antlers, becoming larger 
and more elaborate in approaching the modern era. 

Elephants, two or three species of which constitute 
in the modern world the sole representatives of an or- 
der, are a remnant of an ancient race, once vastly 
more numerous. They appear in Europe and Asia, 
where they were represented by three distinct genera, 
Elephas, Mastodon and Dinotherium, These ele- 
phantine animals were known in America in the Pleis- 
tocene period, and contemporaneous with early man. 
Although now altogether destitute of these animals, 



no 



AGGIE LIFE. 



several remains of species, both of Elephas and Mas- 
todon, have been found in Siberia and the Arctic re- 
gions. Several specimens preserved in a frozen state 
were so protected by dense fur as to be able to en- 
dure extreme cold. A picture of a skeleton of a 
huge Mastodon was shown. The Mastodon died out 
before the Mammoth of the Arctic coast, of which 
many legends exist among the people of that region. 
Huge tusks are now found in large quantities along 
the Siberian coast. 

The last picture was that of an orang-outang, and 
the professor spoke of its remarkable resemblance to 
man, and of man's probable descent from that species, 

The lecture proved to be very instructive, and was 
delivered in Professor Lull's usual interesting way. 



THE JUNIOR PROMENADE. 

On Wednesday night occurred the chief social 
event of the winter. The night was a blustering one, 
exceedingly cold and unpleasant, but notwithstanding 
these drawbacks the gathering was a very pleasant 
and merry affair. About fifty couples were present 
and good cheer reigned throughout the evening. 

The hall was very prettily decorated with military 
colors; large streamers festooning from an impro- 
vised beam overhead to the walls in various direc- 
tions, flags gracefully hanging in those places to pro- 
duce the best effect were set off by potted plants, 
evergreen, and flowers. The patronesses sat at the 
south end of the hall in a bower of evergreens and 
potted plants. The ^orchestra was placed on a plat- 
form at the north end of the hall under a huge flag. 
A large field gun pointed its grim muzzle shining with 
the light of an electric lamp placed within, from 
each corner of the platform toward the center of the 
floor. Back of the guns were two alcoves tastefully 
arranged with chairs, sofas, and rugs, for the comfort 
of the guests. Numerous designs made up of mili- 
tary equipments adorned the walls, the most notable 
being a circle of bayonets, set off with a drum bearing 
a large " M " in maroon, and lighted within. Around 
the gallery were many banners won by the College in 
athletic and military contests. 

At eight o'clock the patronesses began to receive 
the guests and at quarter past eight Warner's Orches- 
tra rendered the overture " Silver Bell "which was fol- 
lowed byseveral other selections. At quarter past nin e 



the dancing began with a waltz to the strains of Jansen's 
" My Lady Fair." Dancing followed till twelve 
o'clock when refreshments were served by caterer 
Wood. After a short intermission dancing was 
resumed and continued till three o'clock when to the 
tune of " Home Sweet Home " ended the most 
enjoyable event of the season. 

The patronesses were : Mrs. Goodell, Mrs. Paige, 
Mrs. Ostrander, Mrs. Lull, Mrs. Babson, Mrs, Fer- 
nald, Mrs. Stone. 

The committee of arrangements were : C. L. Rice, 
chairman. Dr. Paige, Prof. Hasbrouck, N. D. Whit- 
man, J. H. Chickering, C. T. Leslie, H. A. Paul, L, 
Claflin, C. M. Kinney. V. A. Gates. Much praise is 
due the members of the committee especially Mr. 
Whitman whose efforts in trimming the hall many 
thanks are due. 

Among the guests were: Miss Barry of Hadley, 
Miss Hall of North Amherst, Miss Roberts of East 
Hampton, Miss Logan of Boston, Miss Hinckley of 
Amherst, the Misses Towne of Ware, Miss Cora 
King of Sandusky, 0., Miss Singleton of Florence, 
Mrs. Ovalle of Amherst, Miss Jennings of East Green- 
wich, Miss Roberts of North Amherst, Miss Field of 
Leverett, Miss Tucker of Monson, Dr. Stowell and 
wife of North Amherst, Miss Hobart of North 
Amherst, Miss Wiley of Amherst, Miss Sargent of 
Northampton, Miss Bloomer of New York City, Miss 
Harris of Boston, Miss Daniels of Brookline, Miss 
Morse of Clinton, Miss Smith of Worcester, Miss 
Hayes of Northampton, Miss Miller of Holyoke, 
Miss McDermott of Providence, Miss Monahan of 
South Framingham. Miss Bartlett of South Natick, 
Miss Adams of Amherst, Miss Agnes Goessmann of 
Amherst, Miss Walsh, Miss Sanborn, Miss Ellis of 
Newton, Miss Dickinson of North Amherst, Miss 
Fisher of Amherst, Mr. Carpenter and wife of Amherst, 
Mrs. Lindsay of Amherst, Miss Trott of Amherst, 
Miss Ruder of Northampton. 



THE GEOLOGY OF THE CONNECTICUT 
VALLEY. 

The third lecture under the auspices of the Natural 
History Society was given in the Chapel Friday even- 
ing, Feb. 15 by Prof, Emerson of Amherst College, 
who spoke very instructively on the " Geology of the 
Connecticut Valley." His lecture was illustrated by 



AGGIE LIFE. 



the use of several charts and diagrams. 

By the term Connecticut valley is meant not simply 
the area about the river itself but a considerable dis- 
trict in addition, extending as far north as Brattleboro 
and running about twenty miles each side of the river. 
In our latitude for instance it is bounded by the hills of 
Pelham and Belchertown on the east and Williams- 
burg on the west, The geological formation of this 
valley is far different from that of the surrounding coun- 
try and is of far more interest to the student. At a 
time when ferns were the highest type of vegetation 
and lizards the highest animals, the region was an arm 
of the sea. This can be proved by the celebrated 
"bird-tracks " to be found in abundance on the ledge 
just below Mt. Tom Station, which must have been 
formed by the hardening of the plastic mud just after 
the sea-ivater had all evaporated. Further evidence 
may be seen at the old Sunderland ferry where rocks 
are often seen bearing the imprint of scales of salt- 
water fishes. 

While under the salt water.sand was constantly being 
brought down and deposited by the Miller's, Deerfield 
and Mill rivers whicn flowed then much as at present. 
The result was that a stratum of sandstone was formed 
of varying depth. In most cases it is not very thick 
to-day, ahhough at Northampton an artesian well was 
sunk 3700 feet through it without striking the original 
igneous rock. 

The next stage was that of volcanic action, which 
set in near the present location of the Holyoke Range. 
At first there was merely a quiet flow of lava over the 
bottom of the gulf, but later on there were violent 
eruptions as at Pompeii. The final result was the 
formation of the Holyoke range. 

The salt water gulf gradually gave place to a fresh- 
water lake with the river flowing through. An upheaval 
of the sandstone took place causing the formation of 
many " faults." These opened up wide crevasses and 
also caused some parts of the valley to rise higher than 
others. Thus we find Amherst considerably above the 
usual level of the valley. 

We must not suppose that that valley was at the 
same level then as now, Amherst for instance now but 
about 300 feet above the sea level then probably stood 
nearly as high as Pelham or Williamsburg, that is 
about 1000 feet. But when the glaciers came they 
wore away the soft sandstone of the valley, leaving 



untouched the harder granites of the hills. Sugar-loaf 
and Mt. Toby escaped the common demolition and 
remain as landmarks of the original level of the region. 
In Amherst the only remaining outcropping of the 
sandstone is to be found by the High School Building 
and also by the Central Vermont Railway Station. 

When the glaciers had melted away the river again 
began to flow, but in some places it left its old bed and 
chose a new course, adapting itself to the crevasses 
formed by the "faults." This change of level pro- 
duced the water privileges at Miller's Falls, Turner's 
Falls and Holyoke, together with very many others. 
Nor is the river's course permanent even now, for it is 
still wearing away the shore all along its course, 
especially at North Hadley and just below Northamp- 
ton where the road has to be moved back every few 
years. 

The Connecticut valley is one of the richest fields 
known for geological study. The lecture was there- 
fore extremely valuable not only as a source of general 
information but also as a supplement to the regular 
geological course. 



^olle^f f^otfs- 



— Allen, 1903, is spending a few days at his home 
in Winthrop. 

— Dr. Wellington is out again after a several weeks 
illness with grip, 

— Friday, the 22nd, will be celebrated by omitting 
College exercises. 

— C. L. Rice recently spent two or three days at 
his home in Pittsfield. 

— Thompson, 1904, enjoyed a short visit from his 
parents and sister last week. 

— John M. Dellea has been obliged to leave college 
for a few days on account of illness. 

— Prof, and Mrs. Maynard spent several days last 
week visiting friends in Northampton. 

— Dr. H. T. Fernald delivered a lecture in Har- 
vard: Mass. Friday evening, February 15th. 

— Mr. Canavan who has been dangerously ill with 
pneumonia for the past week is somewhat better. 

— Blake, 1902, has had a serious relapse necessi- 
tating his mother being summoned to care for him 



112 



AGGIE LIFE, 



— Dr. H. T. Fernald attended a reunion of the 
Maine State College alumni held in Boston, February 
8th 

— Dr. C. A. Goessmann after a somewhat lengthy 
illness has again resumed his duties at the station and 
the college. 

— The petition that College exercises for Thursday 
after the prom, to be held on Saturday was granted, 
thus causing the condition exams, to be put off one 
week. 

— A number of portraits of eminent men whose 
scientific investigation has gained for them an endur- 
ing fame now hang on the walls of the zoological lec- 
ture room. 

— Dr. H. T. Fernald will give an illustrated stere- 
opticon lecture in the chapel Thursday evening, Feb- 
ruary 21, at 7-45 o'clock. His subject will be "How 
Animals See." 

— Prof. Tyler of Amherst college gave an interest- 
ing talk before the College Y. M. C. A. on last Sun- 
day. This was the day of prayer for colleges and 
was duly observed as such. 

— Several voices from College will take part in the 
oratorio St. Paul, to be given in Amherst college 
shortly. The chorus consists of fifty selected voices 
from the town and colleges. 

— That new boarding-house racket smacks more 
of the fairy tale than of "oxtail." At any rate we 
are given one year in which to let our appetites in- 
crease (which is impossible.) 

— On Monday evening Professor S. F. Howard 
gave an interesting talk before the members of the 
Chemical Club. His subject was Victor Meyer, a 
distinguished chemist whose portrait adorns the walls 
of the chemical lecture room. 

— A most interesting and instructive lecture on the 
geology of the Connecticut Valley was given in the 
chapel on Friday night by Prof. Emerson of Amherst 
college. The lecture was illustrated by various charts 
and contrivances. A goodly number availed them- 
selves of so valuable an opportunity to hear this well- 
known geologist and entertaining speaker. 

— The Junior Prom, was a great success. The 
hall looked better than usual and with the exception 
of the temperature, everything was quite satisfac- 



tory. Several new features were introduced in the 
decorations, among which were the two large arc 
lights and the 3 in. cannon. Our advantages in hav- 
ing a plant-house and a military department are fully 
realized en this night above all others of the year. 



THE SALT MINES OF MANISTEE. 

About one hundred and seventy-five miles across 
the lake from Chicago, in the northern part of the 
state of Michigan is the small city of Manistee, and a 
busier little city it would be difficult to find. 

The Manistee river flows down from the north, 
through the best timber section of the state, widening 
into a small lake about a mile broad and two miles 
long, then converging into a narrow channel about a 
mile long, which flows into Lake Michigan. The 
city of Manistee is located on both sides of the river, 
between Lake Michigan and the small inland lake 
called East Lake. 

In the summer time East Lake is about as full of 
logs as a lake can be, to furnish work for the numerous 
sawmills and shinglemills which surround the lake. 
The advantages of this location are apparent. The 
logs are driven down the river from the lumber camps 
into East Lake. Each separate company has a defi- 
nite part of the lake penned off by log booms, so as 
soon as the logs begin to come into the lake they are 
assorted and floated into their respective booms, from 
which they are taken into the mills to be sawed into 
beams, planks, boards, and shingles. The lumber- 
yards are on the docks of East Lake. The Lake 
" Freighters " are towed up the river to these docks 
where they take their cargoes of lumber and sail to 
any desired port on the Great Lakes. 

Close by nearly every sawmill are two or three, 
and in some cases as many as five high towers, very 
similar to those seen the oil-regions of Pennsylvania. 
Some ten or twelve hundred feet below the surface of 
the earth is a mammoth bed of salt, and under each 
of these towers is a well and pump. The water 
pumped up from these wells contains the salt in solu- 
tion. Evaporate the water and there remains good 
wholesome salt. 

In connection with these sawmills and " saltblocks " 
is an excellent illustration of the conservation of 
energy. Steam is the power employed and sawdust 
is the fuel used. In the boiler-room of the larger 



AGGIE LIFE. 



"3 



plants there are as many as twelve great boilers, In 
rows of six on either side. The sawdust is fed to the 
fires by automatic carriers and feeders. One fireman 
watches the steam gauges and regulates the draughts 
and feeders for the twelve boilers. The steam is 
carried to a powerful engine which turns all the 
machinery of the sawmill, pumps the salt water from 
the wells, besides turning the machinery in the cooper- 
shop which will be described later. The exhaust 
steam is used to evaporate the water from the salt. 

In one of the most modern plants the salt water is 
pumped into two immense iron receptacles called 
" vacuum pans." These pans are egg-shaped the 
small end being down, and are fifty feet in height and 
thirty feet in diameter. A reducing engine produces 
a partial vacuum in the first pan, thereby considerably 
lowering the boiling temperature. The exhaust steam 
from the engine is carried in pipes through the first 
vacuum pan, and produces suffictent heat to boil the 
salt water. 

The steam generated by the boiling brine in the first 
vacuum pan is carried in large pipes through the 
second pan, in which the atmospheric pressure is still 
more reduced to facilitate the boiling of the brine. 
As the water evaporates the salt settles to the bottom 
of the pans. The salt is carried up from the bottom 
of the pans by scoops on an endless chain. The salt 
is dripping wet as it comes out of the pans, and is 
piled up in enormous sheds to dry. Often these 
" blocks " of salt cover as much in area as a city 
block, and are twenty or twenty-five feet high. It is 
left in this condition till it gets dried, then it may be 
left there a good deal longer to bring a higher price. 
Meanwhile the salt becomes quite solid like a great 
white rock. 

While the salt is settling we will have an opportu- 
nity to inspect another important part of the plant, the 
cooper-shop. Here are all the modern devices for 
making rough strong barrels, suitable for shipping the 
salt. There are saws for sawing the staves and saws 
for sawing the barrel heads. 

The man who begins to "set up " the barrels has a 
large pile of staves close at hand. In front of him is 
a machine with a wire rope loop considerably larger 
than the circumference of a barrel. After dropping a 
steel barrel hoop on the floor beneath the loop he 
quickly stands the staves in a circle around the inside 



of the hoop, then pulling a lever, the wire loop draws 
the staves tightly together near the top. He binds 
them together at the top with another steel hoop, then 
loosens the wire loop and rolls the partly finished 
barrel to the next department, where big iron rings are 
slipped over the ends of the barrel and pushed up very 
snug on the barrel by a kind of vice. These hold the 
barrels steady while the rimmer makes the grooves 
for the barrel heads to fit into. The bottom is put in 
the hoops nailed on, the big iron rings slipped off and 
the barrel is ready for business. The normal output 
of one of these cooper shops employing twelve or 
fifteen men is twenty-five hundred barrels per day. 

The salt is packed in these barrels, weighed, and 
loaded on the boats and shipped to Chicago, where 
it is distributed to the trade. 

It is interesting to note that this immense layer of 
salt was not discovered by accident, but by a scientific 
man, a geologist, who after making a careful study of 
that part of the country, concluded that there ought to 
be a large salt bed in that locality, so this commercial 
industry represants another triumph for science. 

W. "98. 



PUBLIC LECTURES. 

Three lectures under the auspices of the Natural 
History Society have been given and have been very 
successful. All three were illustrated. Professor Wil- 
son's by lantern and models. Professor Lull's by stere- 
opticon alone, and Professor Emerson's by charts and 
models. The remaining lectures of the course will 
occur on the following dates : 

Feb. 21st, " How Animals See," by Dr. H. T. 
Fernald. 

March 1st, " The Evolution of North America," by 
Dr. Loomis of Amherst College. 

March 8th, " The Survival of the Fittest," by Pro- 
fessor John M. Tyler of Amherst College. 

March 15th, "Some Curious Relations between 
Plants and Animals," by Dr. Dimmock of Springfield. 



THE FORENSIC CLUB. 

Resolved : ''That the annexation of Canada to the 
United States would be beneficial to all parties con- 
cerned." 

The speakers of the evening were R. R. Ray mouth 
and T. Casey on thg affirmative side, and on the neg- 



114 



AGGIE LIFE 



ative N. J. Hunting and J. H. Todd. Some of the 
points brought out by the negative speakers were that 
the United States has enough difficulties in the shape 
of Cuba and the Philippines and that she would do 
well to digest one meal before she eats another. 

The judges, Leslie, Bowler and Cowden gave the 
debate to the negative speakers. 

Mr. Rice acted as critic of the evening; his princi- 
pal criticism was that the participants in the debate 
made statements and had no proof for them. He 
also spoke of levity among the judges and its effect 
upon the judgments reached. 



BASKET-BALL. 



At the beginning of the term a series of games 
were arranged between the classes and short course 
men. A number of these games have already been 
played with the following results : 

Seniors vs. Sophomores, 1 1-6. 

Seniors vs. Juniors, 2-10. 

Seniors vs. Short Course Men, 10-8. 

Juniors vs. Freshmen, 24-4. 

Juniors vs. Short Course, 16-2. 

Sophomores vs. Freshmen, 9-7. 

Sophomores vs. Short Course, 10-10. 

Freshmen vs. Seniors, 12-7. 

Freshmen vs. Short Course, 10-7. 
Last Saturday evening the Drill hall was the scene 
of two exciting games of basket-ball between the 
Juniors and Short Course, and Juniors and Freshmen. 
There was a fair attendance and a small admission 
fee was charged to defray the expense of a new ball. 
The game opened between Seniors and Short Course 
men. The Short Course men showed a lack of prac- 
tice both in passing and goal throwing. The Juniors 
played their usual steady game. Their passing was 
exceedingly good and they kept the ball near their 
opponents' goal. As a whole the game was clean 
and interesting. Summary: 

S. C. M. 

Hunt, c. 

Chiles, r. f. 

Richardson, 1. f. 

Snnith, r. b. 

Crouch, 1. b. 

Score, Juniors, 16; S. C. M., 2. Umpire, Rice. Referee, 
Halligan. 



Juniors. 
Bodfish, c. 
Cooley, r. b. 
Belden. 1. b. 
McCobb. r. f, 
Dellea, 1. f. 



The game between the Seniors and Freshmen fol- 
lowed. The game was exciting from the start to the 
finish and those who were fortunate enough to witness 
it were well repaid for their time. 

The Seniors were apt to be a little rough at times 
but in the excitement of the game this was overlooked. 
The Freshmen played a clean, fast game and surprised 
all by defeating the Seniors. The Freshmen showed 
quite an improvement in their passing and goal throw- 
ing. Summary : 

Seniors. Freshmen. 

Rice, c. White, c. 

Whitman, r. b. Kelliher, 1. f. 

Chickering, 1. b: Pierce, r. f. 

Pierson, r. f. Bowler, r. b. 

Cooke. 1. f. Quigley, 1. b. 
Score, Freshm.en, 12 ; Seniors, 7. Referee, Halligan. 
McCobb. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES. 

THE EXPERIMENT STATION. 

Bulletin 7 1 on Concentrated Feed-Stuffs and Con- 
dimental, Stock and Poultry Foods has just been 
issued by the Division of Foods and Feeding. Part 
1 is chiefly devoted to a report of the analyses of the 
samples of feed-stuffs collected by the division agents 
all over the state. The summary of results shows 
rather less adulteration than formerly, though the 
unguaranteed samples of cottonseed meal, mixed feed 
and oat feed were in many cases badly adulterated. 
Farmers are advised to purchase only guaranteed 
brands. Gluten meals and feeds are strongly recom- 
mended as " among the cheapest and most desirable 
feed-stuffs in the market." The use of the oat-feeds 
is depreciated, Most of the samples " have not over 
one-half the feeding-value of corn meal. It is believed 
that farmers actually throw away a large amount of 
money on this class of feeds." 

Part 2 takes up Condimental Stock and Poultry 
Foods in much the same way. The analyses of these 
foods show that they are composed chiefly of some 
cheap material like wheat bran, corn meal, charcoal 
or oyster shells. The food materials are worth in 
general about $20 a ton ; the average cost of these 
foods was from $ 1 .20 to $3.60 a ton. Small amounts 
of medicinal compounds, notably common salt, gin- 
ger and pepper are also found. The verdict is that 
the materials can be obtained separately at far less 



AGGIE LIFE. 



"5 



price. The use of these condition powders with well 
animals is discouraged as unnecessary and even det- 
rimental, The claims of the manufacturers are 
shown to be in most cases ridiculous, and experiments 
are cited to show that any money spent for these 
powders is worse than thrown away. 

The main portion of the bulletin is by Dr. Lindsey, 
assisted by E. B. Holland, P. H. Smith and J. W. 
Kellogg. There is also a supplementary article on 
the Utility of Condimental Foods and Condition 
Powders by Dr. J. B. Paige. 

Another bulletin on " Green Manures " also gotten 
out by the Division of Foods and Feeding is now in 
press and will be ready in a short time. 

At the Hatch barn, the usual digestion work is 
being carried on with sheep. An experiment is also 
under way to determine the effect of an excess of 
fatty food on the quality of butter. In this experiment, 
the cows in the test are receiving a considerable 
amount of pure cottonseed oil each day. 

Besides the routine work in the Divisions of Fer- 
tilizers, the force is engaged in analyzing samples of 
Paris Green and other arsenical compounds which 
have collected in the state. A tremendous variation 
in value together with considerable adulteration is 
reported. 

A new Becker balance, similar in style to those 
already in use has been recently added to the equip- 
ment of the Division of Foods and Feeding. Several 
new chemistries have also been added to the librar y 

THE CHEMICAL DEPARTMENT. 

A course of lectures on Chemical Apparatus by G. 
F. Parmenter and Chemical Literature by Prof. How- 
ard is provided for the student-assistants this term. 

The Juniors have completed their course in Quali- 
tative Analysis and begin Organic Chemistry this 
week. It is expected that several students from 
Amherst and Brown are also to take the course. 

THE VETERINARY DEPARTMENT. 

Several additions have been made to the museum 
and considerable new apparatus is expected in a short 
time. 

Dr. Paige is devoting considerable time to the 
study of anthrax. He now has cultures growing in 
various media and under different extremes of tem- 
perature. It has been stated that the spores will 



retain their vitality under the right conditions for so 
long a period as ten or even fifteen years. Cultures 
made by Dr. Paige in the summer of '91 however 
have so far failed to produce the disease. 



COMMUNICATION. 

Editor Aggie Life : 

A copy of your school magazine Aggie Life 
brought to my attention, recalls that when gathering 
data for the establishment of the Lowell Textile 
School, I became very much interested in German 
provisions for instruction in agriculture as set forth in 
an article on technical and trade schools by Consul J. 
C. Monoghan, at Chemnitz, Saxony, published in the 
United States Consular report of August, 1894. 
While ample provision is made by Germans for insti- 
tutional instruction in agriculture this is supplemented 
by traveling teachers, or lecturers, who periodically 
visit all sections of the country, observing methods, 
correcting errors, coming directly in contact with the 
farmer and local farmers' associations. These are 
not simply ambitious politicians who attend agricultural 
fair dinners and discourse on public topics, but work- 
ing teachers thoroughly instructed to present intelli- 
gently the science and practical art of agriculture. 

It seemed to me that there must be available a 
large body of trained graduates of your college who 
have since had practical experience in applying their 
education to agriculture, who could be drawn upon for 
this service and who would thus be of inestimable 
benefit to the agriculture of the state. Even now at 
farmers' institutes we hear it solemnly asserted that 
picking off the blossoms of the apple trees will per- 
manently change the bearing year,that seeds planted in 
the dark of the moon will run to root and in its light to 
top, etc. You may deluge the farmer with agricul- 
tural reports and statistics and he will still keep on in 
the old way. What is wanted is some trained expert 
to visit his farm, observe his methods and induce him 
to try new and improved ones. I presume your people 
are thoroughly familiar with all foreign methods of 
agricultural education and possibly this feature of trav- 
eling teachers has been considered, but I do not 
recall any reference to it in state publications. 
Very respectfully, 

James T. Smith. 



ii6 



AGGIE LIFE. 



vimns. 



'83. — Charles H. Preston represents the town of 
Danvers in the legislature this year. 

'89. — Franklin Ware Davis, 85 College Ave., Ros- 
lindale, Mass., Clerk of the Mass. Agr'l College Club 
of Massachusetts. 

'95. — E. A. White has been elected assistant pro- 
fessor of Horticulture and Assistant Horticulturist in 
the Texas Agricultural and Mechanical college and 
Experiment station. Address, College Station, Texas. 

'98. — W. S. Fisher is spending a few days in 
Amherst. 



n-tercolle^'satf . 



With the basket-ball season nearly at an end the 
probable champion seems to be Dartmouth as for last 
year, that team having so far defeated all comers. 

Special students at the University of Chicago will 
hereafter be required to attend chapel and other gen- 
eral college exercises, including physical culture. This 
action was made necessary by the discovery that prac- 
tically all the regular students were being transferred 
to the list of special students in order to avoid these 
compulsory exercises. 

The action of the two Harvard professors in accept- 
ing the chairs at Leland Stanford made vacant 
because of a personal controversy of their occupants 
with Mrs. Stanford, is exciting much adverse comment 
in educational circles. The general idea seems to be 
that they were altogether too hasty and accordingly 
gave an exhibition of bad taste. 

An interesting lawsuit in Pennsylvania has just been 
decided. A student of Western Reserve University 
Law School was found guilty by the faculty of some 
misdemeanor and as a result not allowed to resume 
his studies at the beginning of the year. The student 
then brought suit against the college, on the ground 
that he had been illegally restrained from securing 
his degree. The case was hotly contested, but was 
finally decided in favor of the defendant. 

The Sophomores of Arcadia university of Nova 
Scotia are in open rebellion against the faculty. At 
a recent public oratorical exhibition, certain Sopho- 



mores let loose a flock of hens from the gallery above 
on the heads of the audience. One man was con- 
sidered guilty and suspended for the remainder of the 
year. His classmates agreed to stand by him, and 
have now announced as their ultimatum that they 
will enter a neighboring college as a body, unless the 
decision of the faculty is reversed at once. 

The Agricultural appropriation bill has passed the 
House and is now in the hands of the Senate. Con- 
siderable discussion was provoked by an amendment 
to the section relating to the Agricultural colleges, 
which witheld all appropriations from the Utah Agri- 
cultural college till it should be proved that both 
trustees and faculty were innocent of polygamy. A 
Utah Congressman denied the charges brought against 
the college and offered a counter-amendment that 
the funds of all agricultural colleges should be simi- 
larly withheld till their officials were proved guiltless of 
any crime or misdemeanor. Both amendments were 
then lost. 



DEAWING AND BLUE PROCESS PAPERS, 

SCALES, ANGLES, CURVES and T SQUARES, 

ARCHITECTS' AND DRAFTMEN'S COLORS, 

SCHOOL BOXES WATER COLORS, 



INCORPORATED, 
82 and 84 Washington St., ) -r./-vQrp-->-fj 
216 and 218 Clarendon St., / ^'-'^ ^^^ • 



FactorleB, MALDEN, MASS. 



AQQIE LIFE. 

VOL. XI. AMHERST. MASS., APRIL 10, 1901. 

Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

CLARENCE EVERETT GORDON, 1901, Edilor-in-3hief. 
NATHAN DAVIS WHITMAN, 1901, Business Manager. 
LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, 1902, Assistant Business Manager. 



NO. 10 



Assistant Editors. 



CHARLES LESLIE RICE, 1901. 
THOMAS CASEY, 1901. 
CHARLES MILTON KINNEY, 1902. 
RICHARD HENDRIC ROBERTSON, 1903. 



JAMES HENRY CHICKERING, 1901. 
HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT, 1902. 
VICTOR ADOLPH GATES. 1902. 
NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN, 1903. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



FACULTY 

President, H. H. Goodell. LL. D. 
Treasurer, G. F. Mills, A. M. 
Registrar, R. S. Lull, M. S. 

Agriculture : 

Levi Stockbridge, Honorary. 

W. P. Brooks, Ph. D. 
Animal Husbandry and Dairy: 

F. S. Cooley, B. S. 
Botany : 

Physiologic , 

G. E. Stone, Ph. D. 
Pathologic, 

R. E. Smith, M. S. 
Chemistry : 
Jnaustrial, 

C. A. Goessmann, Ph. D., LL. D. 
General, 

C. Wellington, Ph. ;. 
Physical, 

F. S. Howard, B. S. 
Analytic, 

■ G. F. Parmenter, B. S. 
Engineering : 

J. E. Ostrander, A. M., C. E. 
Geology: 

R. S. Lull, M. S. 
History : 

H. H. Goodell, LL. D. 
Horticulture : 

S. T. Maynard, B. S. 



DIRECTORY. 

Language and Literature : 
Modern Languages, 

H. H. Goodell, LL. D. 
English and Latin, 

G. F. Mills, A. M. 
English, 

H. Babson, A. M. 
German, 

R. E. Smith, M. S. 
French, 

G. F. Babb, A. B. 
Mathematics : 

J. E. Ostrander, A. M., C- E. 

P. B. Hasbrouck, B. S. 
Mental Science : 

C. S. Walker, Ph. D. 

Physics : 

P. B. Hasbrouck, B. S. 

Political Science : 

C. S. Walker, Ph. D. 

Veterinary Science : 

J. B. Paige, D. V. S. 

Zoology and Entomology : 
General, 

C. H. Fernald, Ph. D. 
- Entomology, 

H. T. Fernald, Ph. D. 
Zoology and Physiology, 
R. S. Lull, M. S. 



ANNOUNCEMENT. 
For the purpose of bringing before the attention of 
the people of this commonwealth the educational 
advantages of the Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
a special issue of the student paper was published 
during December last, with information concerning 
the college and its work presented in as complete a 
manner as means would allow. The success of that 
effort has led to the publication of a larger and more 
attractive edition. To the information herein given 
we ask the careful attention of all interested in procur- 
ing a scientific training, and a broad and liberal 
education. 



THE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE AND A 
YOUNG MAN'S OPPORTUNITY. 

When man began to feel a need for something 
besides the simple necessities of life, and portions of 
our population began to congest into great manufac- 
turing centres and marts of exchange, the evolution 
of agricultural processes began. Agricultural products 
began to be In great demand for manufacturing pur- 
poses, for food for the manufacturing portion of our 
population, and the simple and primitive methods of 
farming were insufficient for the new order of things. 
Agriculture grew into a complex industry, and the 
economic questions and problems demanding solution 
constantly grew in number. 

The history of the evolution of agriculture in the 
United States is largely a repetition of the history of 
the growth and developmient of the country ; for 
agriculture early furnished the principal articles of 
exchange and must be held the source of our mer- 
cantile and manufacturing life and prosperity, which 
in turn have led to such wonderful development in 
those things which minister to our convenience and 
comfort. 

The occupation of tilling the soil must ever keep a 
place of paramount importance. It has a dignity 
older than the everlasting hills and one with which 
no title of ancient lineage can ever compare. But 
agriculture is an occupation which is fast assum- 
ing an importance aside from its ancient and honorable 
practice, an importance which has grown out of the 
increasing demand for improved methods of cultiva- 
tion as v/ell as for solutions of m.any great economic 
problems. Thus agriculture has grown to be a com- 



prehensive science, and the word agriculture has a 
great deal broader signification than it had a quarter 
of a century ago. It is not too much to say that by 
the majority of people, especially those whose knowl- 
edge of the purpose and scope of agricultural educa- 
tion is only incidental, this wider signification is but 
little understood. Yet it must be obvious that no 
broad and comprehensive science can progress unless 
the problems that are constantly springing up are care- 
fully investigated with a view to their solution. What 
must be the necessary result ? Various departments 
of research will be established which will inevitably 
lead to specialization in each. It is in this way only 
that the most satisfactory progress can be made ; 
that the most satisfactory results may be obtained. 
Thus we have many different departments of agricul- 
tural ^nxsnWs each of which offers opportunity for end- 
less inquiry and investigation. The division may be con- 
veniently made as follows : Agriculture proper, first 
and foremost, to which the other branches are subsid- 
iary and essential ; horticulture, a general term for the 
important occupations of market-gardening, fruit- 
culture, floriculture, landscape-gardening, forestry, etc.; 
botany, which comprises plant feeding, plant physiol- 
ogy, and vegetable pathology ; entomology, which treats 
of insects and their economic importance ; zoology, 
which furnishes a knowledge of animal life and struc- 
ture and lays the foundation for veterinary training so 
important to the farmer; agricultural chemistry, of 
first importance to the farmer, teaching him to con- 
serve manures so commonly wasted, and how prop- 
erly to feed his stock for their health and his profit ; 
veterinary, instructing in the care of farm animals 
and in the prevention of disease. 

In all these departments there is not only special- 
ization in research but great numbers of specialists 
are going out all over the country to engage in work 
along these separate lines. Large numbers of 
men are graduated each year for work in for- 
estry. Landscape gardening is now an important 
profession. Chemists and entomologists are filling 
highly remunerative positions every year. Not only 
is there a need of and a demand for more veterinary 
training in the education of every farmer but there is 
a growing importance in veterinary medicine as a pro- 
fession. In botany great progress is being made in 
the study of plant diseases and their remedies. Gen- 




FROM TOWN TO COLLEGE 



eral agricultural training in the management of farm 
affairs is recognised as an absolute necessity to suc- 
cessful farming; and market-gardeners, fruit-growers, 
and greenhouse owners are seeking to obtain the best 
possible training for their important work. 

Was not his a far-sighted vision which could pene- 
trate the obscurity of the future and provide for these 
important agricultural interests of to-day ? To the 
late Senator Justin A. Morrill of Vermont belongs the 
honor of founding the agricultural colleges of this 
great country and of raising a bulwark for our national 
strength and glory in every state of the Union. In 
1864. in accordance with the provisions of the so- 
called Land-Grant Act of 1862, under the combined 
action of the state and federal governments, the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College was incorporated. 
In 1882, the Experiment Station was also established 
and located at Amherst on the grounds of the Agri- 
cultural College. The work of both these institutions 
is going on to-day, and both are enjoying a prosperity 
unprecedented in their history. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College offers a 
free education to the young men of the state. It 
gives a four years' course leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science, and a graduate course leading 
to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy. The graduate course was established 
because the college had certain peculiar facilities 
and advantages which could be nowhere else obtained. 
The institution was forced to offer opportunity for 
graduate work in those departments wherein it is 
peculiarly strong. As a special school it became its 
prerogative to establish a graduate course in those 
subjects which could not be pursued to so good advan- 
tage anywhere else. The movement has met with 
favor, and men from other institutions are taking 
advantage of the opportunities for study in entomol- 
ogy, botany, chemistry, and agriculture offered by the 
state college. There is no reason why the depart- 
ment of graduate work will not grow to great import- 
ance as its advantages become more clearly and more 
widely apparent. Advanced work is also offered in 



mathematics and physics. Careful attention is paid 
to EngUsh rhetorical composition and to literature 
throughout the four years' course. French and Ger- 
man are each required for one year and are elective 
in the senior year. Mathematics and chemistry are 
each required as are also the elementary and essen- 
tial branches of agriculture and horticulture. In the 
study of the latter the student will be brought into 
contact with nature, and may learn to take pleasure 
in the study of the animal and plant life with which he 
meets. The needs of those who look forward to 
teaching are considered and miet, while for those 
who desire a broad and liberal college education to 
fit for business and mercantile life a training of the 
best kind is offered in the study of subjects that 
are eminently practical and useful as well as broaden- 
ing and upbuilding. 



DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE. 

The horticultural interests of Massachusetts, when 
we consider the growing of fruits, vegetables and 
flowers, all the ornamental features of our homes, 
private estates and public grounds, are not less im- 
portant than those of agriculture proper and call for 
most varied education and skill. 

The aim of the horticultural department is to give 
to each and every student a fair knowledge of the 
business of horticulture in all its lines, i. e. fruit-cul- 
ture, market-gardening, horticulture and landscape 




THE CHAPEL 



gardening and including some of the fundamental 
principles of forestry as related to the methods of 
improving the conditions of the forests of Massachu- 
setts or New England. This work is carried on dur- 
ing the sophomore and junior years, one term being 
given to each subject. 

In the senior year the course in horticulture is 
intended to fit the student for the practice of fruit 
culture, market-gardening, floriculture, or landscape- 
gardening. It is urged that every student who elects 
horticulture, should, while making some one of these 
subjects a specialty become more or less familiar with 
all lines of this subject and possibly some lines of agricul- 
ture, as the conditions under which both agriculture 
and horticulture are carried on in New England vary 
greatly, and our farms possess so many varying con- 
ditions that no one can tell into what side-issues one 
engaged in dairying or in fruit growing may not be 
drawn. 

It is important that those who have selected some 
line of horticulture for their life work become chilled 
in the practice of that work as soon as possible. 
To this end all the important hardy fruits and all mar- 
ket garden crops are grown, to a limited extent, in the 
field and under glass. Also on a commercial 
scale all out-door bedding or flowering plants, all 
plants for indoor decoration, trees, shrubs and plants 
for outside decoration of the home. This routine 
work can be seen and performed by the students 
whenever time permits. The 
student may, if he will, become 
considerably skilled in this routine 
work. 

The equipment for this work 
consists of about 75 acres in the 
horticultural department proper, 
upon which are grown all the kinds 
of horticultural crops in condition 
to illustrate all stages of growth 
from the sowing of the seed to the 
full grown tree or plant, and in 
most cases in sufficient quantities 
to illustrate the market or com- 
mercial side of these lines of hor- 
ticulture. For the study of land- 
scape gardening, we have first of 




THE FOOT BALL TEAM 



all an ideal location, being surrounded on all 
sides by the greatest wealth of natural beauty. The 
grounds have been laid out into 2. farm-park, where 
the farm, and garden portions are more or less inter- 
mingled. While ornamental they fully carry out 
the modern ideas of the natural system of land- 
scape gardening, and illustrate the blending of 
beauty and utility that should surround all farm homes. 
The equipment for teaching floriculture is one of 
the best connected with any agricultural college in 
the country, having sufficient space under glass 
to illustrate the business of growing the most important 
cut-flower plants, house and out-door decorative plants, 
etc. The green-houses are of many forms and 
include as many methods of construction and cf heat- 
ing and ventilating appliances as possible. For the 
study of landscape gardening the large collection of 
ornamental trees, shrubs and plants arranged in various 



places about the grounds affords a good opportunity 
for the student to become familiar with the materials 
used in ornarriental planting. A large number of the 
graduates are now successfully engaged in this line of 
work, with a demand for more men than are qualified 
for the positions offered. The demand is increasing 
for men trained to care for large private estates and 
public grounds as well as for men to engage in 
business in large horticultural establishments, the 
great requisites for success being a broad scientific 
education, skill and good business ability. The train- 
ing at the Massachusetts Agricultural College in 
Chemistry, Botany, Physics, Entomology, English and 
the Modern Languages, together with good business 
judgment and industry will fit young men to be suc- 
cessful in any horticultural calling and to make 
fortunes for themselves and for the town and state 
influential and progressive citizens. 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY. 

It is easy to believe that the country which has the 
best chemists will be the most prosperous and the 
most powerful. It will have, at the lowest cost, the 
best food, the best mannfactured articles, the fewest 
wastes and unutilized forms of matter, the best guns, 
the strongest explosives, the most resistant armor. 
Its inhabitants will make the best use of their country's 
resources ; they will be the most healthy, the most 
free from disease ; they will oppose the least resist- 
ance to favorable evolution ; they will be the most 
thrifty and the least dependent on other nations. 
Competition to-day between nations is essentially a 
competition in the science and application of Chemistry. 

But the educational force of Chemistry is not 
expended in producing chemists alone. An eminent 
national writer has said. " The education of its people 
in Chemistry and the physical sciences is the most 
paying investment a country can make." Aside from 
training chemists and providing an important factor in 
all liberal courses of education, chemical study per- 
forms a special service for still other professions. 
Engineers, physicians and physiologists often find their 
success measured directly by the extent of their chem- 
ical training. 

Accurate observation, logical thinking, systematic 
and constant industry, are absolute requisites for the 
successful chemical student. And these are the fac- 
tors which make men of affairs, administrators of 
large interests and statesmen. 

Courses adapted to the requirements mentioned 
are offered at this college. Instruction is given in 
general and organic Chemistry, all kinds of analysis, 
including that of minerals and preparations. The 
needs of students, fitting for positions in experiment 
stations and those taking courses in entomology, bot- 
any and other biological subjects, medicine, veterinary 
science, dairy work and agriculture, receive special 
attention. 

A Chemical club meets at stated times, usually in 
the evening, for discussion in a social way, of current 
topics of interest. This is attended by the students, 
members of the faculty and the officers and workers 
of the experiment station. The meetings are fre- 
quently addressed by interesting speakers on live sub- 
jects from practical life. They are a source of enthu- 
siasm highly valued by those who participate. 



DEPARTMENT OF VETERINARY SCIENCE. 

According to the last census the total value of 
domestic animals and their products in the United 
States amounts to nearly two and one-half billions of 
dollars distributed as follows: 



Value of farm animals. 
Value of dairy products, 
Value of poultry and products. 



$1,655,414,612 
454,900.000 
343,000,000 



Total, $2,453,314,612 

In Massachusetts the value of farm animals is 

placed at $19,521,586 

Value of dairy products, 9,544,375 

Value of poultry products, 553,970 



Total. $29,619,931 

A conservative estimate gives an annual loss on 
this valuation of 6% due to the ravages of disease 
among live stock. By the intelligent application of 
the lav/s of animal hygiene a greater part of this loss 
is preventable. 

The figures given above show the relation of Veter- 
inary science to animal husbandry. With the rapid 
development of Veterinary medicine and bacteriology 
during the past twenty years we have added very 
greatly to our knowledge of the causes of contagious 
and other animal diseases. 

A knowledge of the action and habits of the micro- 
organisms producing this or that disease enables us 
frequently to prevent its action upon our animals. 

The principal aim of modern veterinary science is 
to prevent disease. This is accomplished by the 
more intelligent treatment of our animals- and also by 
the removal and destruction of the elements of conta- 
gion causing disease in them. 

The prevention of animal diseases is largely in the. 
hands of those having the immediate care of the stock. 
The relation of the veterinarian to the one in charge 
is principally that of an advisor. He can direct but is 
not in position in the ordinary every day treatment of 
the animals to carry out the directions. The preven- 
tion rather than the cure of disease should be the 
chief aim of all instruction in veterinary science given 
to agricultural students. 

The course given in M. A. C. at present may be 
outlined as follows: (a) the hygiene of farm animals; 
(b) the anatomy and physiology of the bony, muscu- 
lar, circulatory, respiratory, digestive and genital sys- 
tems ; (c) a study of the more common pathological 




partment has unsurpassed faculties 
for giving instruction in this impor- 
tant branch of agricultural science. 



THE DRILL HALL 



processes and the 
general causes, 
symptoms and ef- 
fects of disease ; (d) 
the consideration of 
the specific diseases 
of the different or- 
gans, particularly as 
regards causes, ef- 
fects and prevention; 
(e) the nature, action 
and use of drugs ; (f) 
a microscopical 
study of the dis- 
ease producing mi- 
cro-organisms and 
animal parasites. 

While the course has been ar- 
ranged principally to meet the re- 
quirements of the stock owner, the 
interests of the prospective medical 
and veterinary students have not 
been ignored. 

With the new laboratory and 
hospital stable constructed after 
the most modern plans, well equip- 
ped with apparatus for the study of 
disease, providing the best of san- 
itary conditions, and for the sep- 
aration of diseased animals and 
thorough disinfection, the de- 



THE VETERINARY 




DEPARTMENT OF ENTO- 
MOLOGY. 

Recognizing the importance of 
a knowledge of insects and the best 
methods of combating them, the 
Trustees of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College have made Ento- 
mology an important part of the 
course of study at this institution. 

During the summer term of the 
Junior year, six hours a week are 
devoted to the study of insects, par- 
ticular attention be- 
ing paid to the prac- 
tical side of the 
subject. After a 
study of such parts 
of insects as are 
used in identifying 
the different spe- 
cies, the life histo- 
ries of the more 
injurious forms are 
considered in detail. 
The objects of 
the Junior course 
are to teach the 
student how to 




THE BARNS 



10 



determine injurious insects as he finds thenn, to 
discover the point in the life history of each one where 
it can be most easily destroyed, and to apply the best 
method of treatment in each case. 

Insects, however, comprise five-sixths of all ani- 
mals, and in the time available during the Junior 
year little more than the general principles of the 
work can be given. For this reason Entomology is 
also an elective subject during the entire Senior year 
where it is of especial importance to students electing 
Botany, Horticulture or Agriculture, or those preparing 
for the study of medicine. During the Senior course 
more critical studies of the external and internal 
anatomy of insects are made ; the literature of the 
subject is carefully studied ; the chemical composition 
of the various poisons used, and the apparatus for 
applying them are investigated, and these with field 
work and the preparation of a thesis on some insect 
or group of insects constitute the course. 

Even here the entomological work does not end. 
The loss each year in the United States by the rav- 
ages of insects has been estimated to amount to 
more than three hundred millions of dollars while the 
number of kinds of insects which cause this loss also 
reaches the millions. As different kinds of insects work 
in different ways, have different life histories and there- 
fore require different treatments, the enormous magni- 
tude of the subject has rendered necessary the education 
of expert entomologists who at college Experiment Sta- 
tions as State Entomologists, Crop Experts, etc., 
may devote their entire time to the task of aiding the 
people of the country in controlling the insects attack- 
ing their crops and thus reducing their loss. Such 
experts are in demand, and in response to that 
demand the College has recently established a three 
years' graduate course consisting of a major and two 
minor subjects, leading to the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy and fitting its graduates for expert work 
as entomologists. That this course supplies a genuine 
need is shown by the number of students already 
taking it, and by the calls for men thus prepared. 

For such a course the College is unusually well 
equipped. A building erected especially for the pur- 
pose is provided with excellent laboratories, and appa- 
ratus such as microscopes, microtomes, reagents, 
glassware, photographic apparatus, etc., is supplied in 
abundance. Over ten thousand books and pamphlets 



on the subject, including files of all the leading ento- 
mological magazines of the world are available for 
reference, to which a card catalogue of about 45,000 
cards affords an easy method of reference. Rooms 
for chemical analysis, photography and for spraying 
apparatus, and a green house for studying affected 
plants, besides the large gardens, green houses and 
orchards belonging to the College, are all available for 
use by the student, v/ho finds his facilities for work in 
this department unexcelled anywhere in the United 
States. 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 

Within a comparatively recent time botany has 
developed an economic side which has already be- 
come important, The enormous resources of the 
United States which form the basis of our industries 
and wealth, together with the inherent utilitarian sym- 
pathies which the American investigator possesses, 
demand work of this nature. The annual losses to 
agriculturists, horticulturists and floriculturists through 
the invasion of fungi, etc., represent millions of dollars, 
and the results of research and experimentation by 
economic botanists have already been the direct 
means of much saving to these industries. The 
amount of money saved, together with the superior 
products produced by brewers, butter makers, etc., 
through the introduction of pure cultures of plant 
organisms, and the adoption of rational hygenic princi- 
ples based upon research, are worthy of notice. The 
study of the flora of our public water supplies, and the 
role that these organisms play, has brought about a 
more careful system of management and a resulting 
lower death rate from certain diseases. 

In the development of the utilitarian aspect of 
botany our A.gricultural Colleges and Experiment Sta- 
tions stand pre-eminent. The enormous amount of 
investigation already accomplished in a single line — ■ 
namely, in plant pathology, — and the important practi- 
cal value of these researches, are alone worth the 
vast sum of money which it has cost the federal and 
state governments to establish and m.aintain these 
institutions. The study of plant diseases and methods 
of suppression have advanced so rapidly that, at the 
present time, plant pathology in America far excels 
that in any other country ; and the numerous problems 
in plant pathology and physiology of an economic 



12 



nature which still remain unsolved indicate that the 
practical results already brought out by patient re- 
search furnish only a suggestion of what may be ex- 
pected in the future. 

The object of the course in botany at this institu- 
tion is to teach those subjects which have a bearing 
upon economic and scientific agriculture, and for this 
purpose economic types of plants and subjects for ex- 
perimentation are selected in so far as they do not 
interfere with a logical and pedagogical sequence. 
There are seven terms of botany in the course, four of 
which are required during the freshmen and sopho- 
more years, and three are elective in the senior year. 
In the required courses for freshmen and sophomores 
it is our aim to convey an elementary idea of the 
fundamental principles of morphology, anatomy, 
flower analysis, classification, and histology, together 
with the ideas of ecology and physiology. The courses 
in these subjects furnish a general training in botany, 
and also form the basis of agricultural and horticul- 
tural study. The courses are made as objective as 
possible, and to illustrate the various subjects accurate 
drawings are made of the specimens under considera- 
tion, thereby developing the powers of observation and 
technique. The senior elective courses are devoted 
to the study of plant pathology and physiology both of 
which are preceded by a brief general outline such as 
is essential before specialization. In plant pathology 
the student is given a hasty review of the cryptogams 
with particular reference to the various groups of 
fungi in order to become acquainted with their rela- 
tionship, after which he confines himself to the study 
of those particular groups with which he is most con- 
cerned. For example, a student may devote two- 
thirds of the year to the study of diseases pertaining 
to the rose, carnation, violet, etc., and methods of 
controlling the same, or he may confine himself to 
those diseases peculiar to the orchard, fruit garden, 
etc. In -this course special attention is given to the 
differences existing between normal and abnormal 
plants, and the susceptibility of the latter to disease is 
continuously emphasized, and the method of treat- 
ment pointed out. 

The most recent literature contained in the Experi- 
ment Station and other special publications is freely 
consulted. The course in plant physiology is corre- 
lated with that in entomology and horticulture. The 



course in practical plant physiology is largely experi- 
mental dealing especially with the functions and reac- 
tion of plants to external conditions. This course is 
correlated with agriculture and horticulture and plant 
pathology on the one hand, and chemistry and physics 
on the other. Either physiology or pathology in con- 
nection with veterinary or chemistry offers a suitable 
preparation for a professional course in veterinary or 
medicine. A finely equipped botanical laboratory 
fitted with experiment apparatus and with compound 
and dissecting microscopes, a laboratory for graduate 
students, a lecture room, a botanical and horticultural 
museum and herbarium, and the extensive conserva- 
tory of exotic plants belonging to the horticultural de- 
partment offer especial advantages for studying physi- 
ological botany and the histology of plants according 
to the most progressive and advanced methods. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 

The zoological instruction aims to cover, in as com- 
prehensive a manner as possible, a systematic and 
comparative view of the entire animal kingdom- 
embracing both living and extinct forms, with the 
exception of the insects. 

In accordance with the plan of passing from the 
known to the unknown ; man himself is taken as the 
first type, and in the sophomore year, with Martin's 
" Advanced Human Body " as a guide, the student is 
led through a study of human anatomy, physiology, 
and hygiene. The study is illustrated by means of 
charts, manikins, models and such portions as are 
readily obtainable for comparison and demonstration. 
Occasional lectures serve to supplement the text-book. 
The aim is to teach the student to know, and to appre- 
ciate to some extent, the marvels of his own organiz- 
ation and to furnish a basis for further study. In the 
junior year the study of Zoology proper is taken up 
and the student becomes the investigator, for the prin- 
cipal work is done in the laboratory, the lectures serv- 
ing only to supplement the knowledge acquired by 
observation. 

The wealth of m.icroscopic life abounding in pools 
and streams near Amherst, and the close proximity to 
marine and inland supply depots, renders it possible to 
have as complete a list of forms for study as the tim.e 
allotted to the work allows. 

An example of each principal group is dissected, 



13 



drawn, studied and compared with others of its class 
with a view to knowing the type and the variations 
caused by different habits and environment. Parallel 
with the anatomical will be the taxonomic or syste- 
matic work ; that is, the study of the forms with 
their classification and arrangement which are exhibited 
in the very complete museum collection, as well as 
by lantern pictures of existing animals and restora- 
tions of extinct ones, and by the growing collection of 
living animals of various sorts. 

Thus the student is brought to understand, by means 
of abundant illustration, the workings of those great 
laws which have governed the evolution of the various 
races; the influence of environment ; the struggle for 
existence ; the probable causes of the extinction of 
great groups of other days, the probable future of 
those existing now and the relations existing between 
man and the rest of the animal kingdom. 

Next year advanced courses in Zoology will be 
offered giving the student a yet deeper insight into 
this most wonderful realm of nature. 



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

It is the aim to make the time devoted to the study 
of the subjects taught under the name of " agriculture" 
in this college, as fruitful as may be in the develop- 
ment of mental power and the acquisition of a knowl- 
edge of the scientific principles on which the various 
farm operations depend. The course is not regarded 
as having industrial training alone for its object ; 
neither, on the other hand, is it so planned as to give 
no help on the side of industrial training. 

Technical training alone, or, applying the principles 
under consideration directly to agriculture, instruction 
in the best methods of plowing, planting, reaping, feed- 
ing, etc. would more appropriately be taught in a 
farm school than in a college of agriculture. That 
such training is uncalled for is not believed. There is 
among us much slovenly farm work which should be 
bettered ; but improved methods of work can better 
be taught either in a school of practice or upon the 
private farm than in connection with a college course. 
President Hadley of Yale has recently well said : 
" There are two ways of making a man a better worker 
in his profession : by technical training, which teaches 
him in his school days the things which otherwise he 
would have to learn afterwards ; and by scientific 



training, which teaches him in those same school days 
things which he would otherwise not learn at all. The 
former aims to save the time of the student, the latter 
to increase his opportunities of ultimate development." 

It is profoundly believed that the agricultural train- 
ing in college should be directed chiefly to the attain- 
ment of the second of these objects. 

While, however, this side of our work receives the 
greater emphasis, m.uch help, it is believed, is given on 
the technical side as well, through the discussion and 
study of the principles upon which depends the accom- 
plishment of the objects in view in the various farm 
operations. 

With a knowledge of these principles or with a 
mind fitted by training to look for principles and always 
to work with these uppermost, one soon learns the 
" technique " of farm operations; can adapt oneself 
to the ever varying conditions of practical experience ; 
and, best of all, may hopefully look for progress in 
methods. Not how to plow, how to drain, to irrigate, 
to manure ; but why we do these things is it import- 
ant for the college man to learn. 

The training in agriculture now given here is, then, 
largely on its theoretical and scientific sides. It is as 
yet carried on chiefly by means of lectures and text- 
book study. At the same time the application of 
correct theory in practice is constantly and largely 
illustrated by reference to field, to the barns and 
stables, and to experiments in progress. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH. 

The aim of the English department in the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College is to train the students 
to a correct and effective use of the English language 
in the oral and written expression of thought ; to 
secure some acquaintance with the masterpieces of 
American and English literature ; to develop ability 
to present logically and forcibly, oral and written argu- 
ments or propositions assigned for debate. As means 
to these ends rhetoric, literature, argumentation and 
oratory are studied. 

The course in rhetoric comprises a study of the 
choice of words, the theory of phraseology, special 
objects in style, the sentence, the paragraph, the whole 
composition in its plan, arrangement and development. 
This is followed by lectures on invention, in which the 
elements and underlying principles of literature are 



14 



discussed. The students are expected to give practi- 
cal illustration of ttie principles taught in written 
exercises, themes and connpositions that are required 
throughout the course. 

In the study of American and English literature 
text-books on the history of these literatures are used, 
but these text-books are not allowed to take the place 
that belongs to the literatures themselves. The stu- 
dent approaches English literature through American 
literature. Having learned to appreciate and to enjoy 
the literature of his own country he anticipates with 
pleasure some familiarity with the wider field of the 
literature of England. Throughout the course in lit- 
erature an attempt is made to know authors through 
their writings rather than through what others have 
written about their writings. As an important aid to 
an appreciation of literature the English language is 
studied in its origin, structure and development, while 
the principles of literary criticism are found in the 
masterpiecs of standard authors. 

Instruction in oratory is given through exercises in 
declamation, first before the instructor and then before 
the class. In the junior year at least three orations 
upon subjects assigned by the instructor or chosen by 
the student are written and delivered before the class. 

A course in argumentation is a required exercise 
during the senior year. The principles of the subject 
are studied in text-books and in the work of eminent 
debaters, while the practical illustration and use of 
these principles are secured by written briefs and 
forensics, and by oral debate. 

While the studies briefly outlined above are acknowl- 
edged by experienced educators to be of great value 
they will not necessarily produce " good writers " and 
" good speakers," nor will they always be crowned 
with a rich harvest of liberal culture. There can be 
no " good " writing without clear thinking and in our 
desire for effective expression of thought we must not 
lose sight of thought itself. It cannot have escaped 
the notice of those acquainted with college students 
that the thoughtful, earnest ones of their number are 
an unquestioned minority. For this condition of things 
the students are not wholly responsible. Too often 
the hour of recitation or lecture passes without any 
such quickening of the student's interest or attention 
as shall lead to thoughtful consideration of truths 
involved in the subject in hand or suggested by it. 



Fortunate is the teacher of English who can improve 
the opportunity which is his to help his students to an 
intelligent appreciation of the treasures of thought and 
imagination that literature contains. 



DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE. 

The department of Political Science includes both 
economics and civics. To the former two-thirds of 
the year is given and to the latter one-third. 

I. The course in economics begins with the study 
of the facts, definitions, principles and laws which lie 
at the basis of the science. A text-book is used, 
supplem.ented by lectures and frequent examinations. 
The student is required to observe the facts of the 
business world ; to classify them ; to define, distin- 
guish and describe them ; to separate essential facts 
from the non-essential, and then to derive the general 
laws which govern the production, exchange, distribu- 
tion and consumption. of wealth. 

A careful study is made of the economic history of 
England and America that the student may learn from 
the actual experience of the foremost nations how 
land, labor and capital have been used in different 
stages of society for the increase of individual and 
national wealth. 

Opportunity is given to each student to select some 
question in which he is especially interested, in order 
that, under the direction of the instructor, he may 
investigate it thoroughly and give the results to the 
class by reading a paper and defending the same 
orally. The students are shown how to find and to 
use efficiently the best authorities and original sources 
of information. Each class chooses the special course 
ot lectures it prefers, from the following: the tariff, 
monopolistic corporations, the economics of agricul- 
ture, banks and banking, the problems of the currency, 
labor and capital, socialism. Especial attention is 
given to the business relations of agriculture. One 
object is to interest the student in current economic 
questions, fit him to understand the discussion of 
them, and at length enable him to form an opinion so 
that he may wisely adjust himself and his possessions 
to the constant changes of the business world. 

II. C'vics is closely related to economics. The 
one depends upon the other. The text book used is 
"The State," by Woodrow Wilson. This is supple- 
mented by lectures. Preparatory work is done, as 



15 



may be necessary, in the review of 
our political institutions. The na- 
ture ot our government, federal, 
state and municipal, is explained 
and the relations of the three kinds 
of government set forth. The 
actual working of political parties 
is described. Then our govern- 
ment is compared and contrasted 
with the governments of England, 
France and Germany. 

The history of our written and 
unwritten constitutions is studied. 
The origin and development of the 
federal constitution are discussed, 
as related to state constitutions 
and as connected with the constitution of England. 
Details are subordinated to principles. The philosophy 
of government is so taught that it interprets history, and 
enables one to comprehend. methods of administration. 

Five hours a week are given to the work. The 
object kept constantly in view is to make the good 
citizen and the successful man of business ; the 
means employed is a thorough understanding, through 
observation and thought, of the environment consti- 
tuted by the economic and political world. 

The constant endeavor Is to adapt wisely the 
courses to the needs of each class, so that each stu- 
dent shall see with his own eyes and hear with his 
own ears and think for himself and come to his own 
conclusions. The purpose is to make men of convic- 
tions who can rely upon their own judgment and work 




SOUTH COLLEGE 



out for themselves the problems of life that confront 
them. 




CORNER IN THE LIBRARY 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS, PHYSICS 
AND ENGINEERING. 

In a recent paper, under the caption, " Why Study 
Mathematics ? " the author makes the following state- 
ment : " For genuine achievement the mind has need 
of more than the untrained coming and going of ideas. 
* * * Whatever of sympathy and instinctive tact and 
of other unreasoned processes the mind may need in 
facing actual life, it also needs as much skill as it can 
possibly acquire in consciously directed thinking ; that 
is, in appreciating and utilizing clear conceptions ; and, 
however much other branches of study may entertain 
and inform and develop, mathematics is of all studies 
the best fitted by its nature to train the mind 
in thinking clearly and straight to the point." 
These sentiments voice the belief of the 
instructors of the Mathematical Department, 
and every subject handled, from the first term 
of the freshman year to the completion of the 
elective work, is presented with a view to 
reaching this much desired end. 

Aside from the question of mental devel- 
opment, there are plainly evident the utilita- 
rian ends of the subjects taught. The math- 
ematics for the underclassmen are of direct 
value to the student who may adopt teaching 
as his profession, and it is intended to give as 
extensive a research as possible in the allotted 
time. They also form the necessary basis for 



i6 



the work of this department in the upper classes, and 
the embryo engineer or physicist realizes that thorough 
preparation in his first years is essential to success, 
when confronted by the more profound problems that 
the advanced work brings. 

" A little knowledge is a dangerous thing," in these 
days when scientific research probes so deeply into 
the secrets of Nature. As a graduate student, if not 
earlier in his career, the man who would specialize 
learns how extended a general education is needed as 
a foundation for the superstructure he would rear. 

The botanist working along advanced lines of veg- 
etable pathology and physiology finds with each year 
an increasing need for exact knowledge of the princi- 
ples underly the subjects of heat, light and electric- 
ity. In this fact he finds an answer to his undergradu- 
ate question — Of what value is Physics to me if 1 am 
to devote myself to Botany ? 

To the horticulturist, who combines with his knowl- 
edge of horticulture a practical education in the prin- 
ciples of engineering, is given an immense advantage, 
financially, over the man not so equipped. For land- 
scape engineering is a comparatively new field and 
the horticulturist working along this line may find 
competition less severe. 

Toward these ends the department is working, 
adding, when it is possible to the laboratory and field 
equipment so that although only an adjunct, the 
Mathematical Department may keep its place as a 
necessary factor in equipping the graduate of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College for successful 
competition in the world " outside college walls." 



DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGES. 

A scientist early learns his dependence upon the 
experience and thought of others. The scientific stu- 
dent has not gone far before he feels keenly — the 
more keenly if he does not possess it — the advantage 
of being able to draw freely from many and varied 
sources of scientific thought and information. Some 
of the greatest discoveries in modern science have 
been made by those who speak a different language 
from our own. The thorough and painstaking stu- 
dent who wishes to acquaint himself with the best 
thought of the many eminent French and German 
writers, or who wishes to keep abreast of the times in 
the periodical literature dealing with his specialty. 



must acquire a knowledge of the French and Ger- 
man languages. It is because these subjects are not 
only useful but almost indispensable that they are 
required in our scientific schools and have so promi- 
nent a place in their curriculums. Their value has 
been tested and stands unquestioned. 

The definite aim of instruction in French and Ger- 
man at the Massachusetts Agricultural College is to 
meet the requirements of the investigator, whether it 
be in science or literature. Accordingly, one year of 
each is required, and each is offered as an elective 
in the senior year. 

The undergraduate work in French is required in 
the freshman year. A knowledge of the elements ' of 
grammar, such as the fundamental principles of con- 
struction and an acquaintance with regular and irregu- 
lar verbs and their conjugations, is insisted upon. 
Translation is begun early and is given especial atten- 
tion so that the student may acquire a vocabulary as 
soon as possible. In the sophomore year the student 
takes up German. The plan of study is similar to 
that of French in the freshman year, especial atten- 
tion being given to translation. While a knowledge 
of these two languages, as an auxiliary to scientific 
inquiry is held to be of first importance their value 
as studies for mental drill and discipline, and as helps 
to inquiry into French and German literature is not 
forgotten. 



OBJECT OF MILITARY INSTRUCTION IN 
COLLEGES. 

This is a subject only partially understood by many 
and not understood at all by some. By those who 
fully understand it, it is considered a wise precaution- 
ary measure on the part of the general government 
to have young men in college trained ir the Elementary 
Science of War even if not so well instructed in those 
higher branches that fit one for the responsible duties 
of command. It is expected that in case of any 
military emergency, the graduates of these institutions 
would prove a valuable factor in our national defense 
and security. The value of such instruction was 
exemplified in the recent war with Spain. The 
Report of the Inspector General for 1898 says : " The 
presidents of 46 colleges, whose military departments 
numbered about 7,100 students before hostilities 
began, reported that 29 of their military students and 




'■^ 



i 




i8 




■.Mt [ . 



PHYSICAL LABORATORY 

59 alumni had been commissioned in the Regular 
Army, and 157 students and 296 alumni in the Vol- 
unteer Army, a total of 541 officers, or 
enough for about 12 regiments; and 
that 1 ,034 students and ex-students had 
joined the forces as noncommissioned 
officers or privates." 

Ability to handle the rifle and to use 
it effectively, discipline, and an uncon- 
querable esprit de corps have brought 
our army to the high standard it main- 
tains to-day. Training in military schools 
and colleges is supposed to furnish mil- 
itary training without service in the reg- 
ular army. It has a good influence upon 
the physical, moral and social character 
of the student besides inculcating a mil- 
itary spirit, and the lesson of discipline, without which 



a military organization is but a military mob. 
By the uniform he wears, by the instruction 
and drill he receives he is brought into closer 
relations with the government and recognizes 
more clearly his duty to serve it in time of need, 
and to defend its honor. 

Several acts of congress have been passed 
since 1862 appropriating money and public land, 
or scrip in lieu thereof, for the support of the 
Agricultural colleges. These acts of congress 
make military instruction, under a regular army 
officer, compulsory. To further encourage mil- 
itary instruction the general government fur- 
nishes arms and equipments, the president of 
the college giving bond to secure the govern- 
ment against loss or damage of any of this property. 
Military Science embraces problems that find prac- 








CHEMICAL LABORATORY 

tical solution upon the field of battle where the highest 
talent, courage and judgment are demanded. 
Wars have raged since the first dawn of 
civilization and seem likely to continue until 
the dawn of the millenium. Until that bles- 
sed time shall arrive military training will 
be necessary ; after that " Swords will be 
beaten into plow-shares and spears into pru- 
ning hooks." 



GEOLOGICAL LABORATORY 



ADMISSION AND EXPENSES. 

Candidates for admission to the freshman 
class must be sixteen years of age. They will 
be examined orally and in writing upon : 
English, general history, physiology, physical 
geography, algebra (through quadratics), 



ig 




Fall term, $30.00 






Winter term, 25.00 






Summer term, 25.00 








$80.00 


$80.00 


Room, in advance. $8 to $16 term. 


24.00 


48.00 


Board. $2.50 to $5 per week, 


95.00 


190.00 


Fuel. $5 to $15. 


5.00 


15.00 


Washing, 30 to 60 cents per week, 


11.40 


22.80 


Military suit. 


15.75 


15.75 



ENTOMOLOGICAL LABORATORY 

plane geometry and civil government. 

Candidates for advanced standing are exam- 
ined as above and also in the studies gone 
over by the class to which they desire ad- 
mission. 

No examination is required for entrance to 
the winter courses. 

DEGREES. 

The degrees of Bachelor of Science, Mas- 
ter of Science and Doctor of Philosophy are 
granted on the completion of the respective 
required courses of study. 

EXPENSES. 

Tuition in advance (free to citizens of the 
United States.) 



Expenses per year, $231.15 $371.55 

Board in clubs has been about $2.45 per 
week ; in private families, $4 to $5. The 
military suit must De obtained immediately 
upon entrance at college, and is used in the 
drill exercises prescribed The following 
fees will be charged for the maintenance of 
the several laboratories : chemical, $10 per 




ZOOLOGICAL LABORATORY 




BOTANICAL LABORATORY 



term used; zoological, $4 per term 
used; botanical, $1 per term (used 
by sophomore class,) $2 per term 
(used by senior class ;) entomological, 
$2 per term used. Some expense 
will also be incurred for lights and 
text-books. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 

Inhabitants of Massachusetts can, 
in most cases, obtain scholarships by 
applying to their state senators. A 
limited number of scholarships are 
available for non-residents of the state. 

LABOR FUND. 

The object of this fund is to assist 
students dependent on their own ef- 
forts, by furnishing them work in the 
several departments of the college. 



20 



THE WORK OF OUR ALUMNI. 

In estimating the work of any college the 
readiest and perhaps the only way is to con- 
sider the measure of success attained by its 
graduates. If these men after spending four 
years in preparation within her walls find 
themselves but imperfectly fitted for their 
life-work then the college cannot long remain 
in public favor ; if, however, the alumni show 
themselves efficient and well-trained along 
their chosen lines then the college is accom- 
plishing a noble work and need have no fear 
for its future. Of the graduates of this college 
about five hundred are now living, many of 
whom have reached positions of eminence 
and power. The excellent work that our grad- 
uates are doing is assurance enough that no 
person need hesitate to enter the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College from a fear that the 
training afforded is insufficient. 

A survey of the following statement will 
reveal many points of interest, illustrating the 
fact that the college is especially strong in 
what it stands for before the world, as well as 
in all that fits a man for life in many and 
varied lines of work. 

The following statement has been prepared 
from available statistics and is approximately 
correct January, 1900: 

Farmer's, 82; in business, 71 ; teachers 
not in agricultural schools, 22 ; teachers in 
agricultural schools, 19 ; teachers of agricul- 
ture, 2 ; total number of teachers, 43 ; book- 
keepers, etc., 27 ; miscellaneous ; (occupation 
not determined), 26 ; physicians, 26; farm 
superintendents, 22 ; civil engineers, 18; grad- 
uate students, 16 ; chemists, 3 ; chemists in 
experiment stations, 13 ; total number of 
chemists, 16; manufacturers, 15; manufac- 
turers and dealers in fertilizers, 13 ; lawyers, 
12; electricians and electrical engineers, 11 ; 
landscape gardeners, 10; market garden- 
ers, 10 ; florists and nurserymen, 10; veteri- 
nary surgeons, 9 ; journalists, 8 ; agricultural 
journalists, 3 ; total number of journalists, 1 1 ; 
entomologists, 5 ; dentists, 5 ; clergymen, 5 ; 
architects, 4 ; in dairy bureau and board of 
agriculture, 4 ; experiment station directors, 




VETERINARY LABORATORY 




MECHANICAL LABORATORY 




HORTICULTURAL AND FORESTRY MUSEUM 



22 




THE PHYSIOLOGICAL LABORATORY 




DAIRY LABORATORY 



ZOOLOGICAL MUSEUM 




4; college presidents, 2 ; miners, 
2; seedsmen, 2; mechanics, 1 ; 
railroad work, 1 ; province gov- 
ernor of Japan, 1 ; president of 
Massachusetts cattle commission, 
1 ; vice-director. experiment 
station, Washington, 1 ; secretary 
of Guernsey Breeder's associa- 
tion, 1 ; member of House of 
Lords, Japan, 1; superintendent 
of creamery, 1 ; meteorologist, 1. 



NORTH COLLEGE 



23 




THE ROPE PULL 




THE PROMENADE 




STUDENT S ROOM 



24 



I love that old Botanic Walk, the pond, the brook and nieadov^ 
The stately poplars growing there, and every dusky shadov/. 
Each spear of grass, each leaflet, and each modest little flov/er. 
Are mine to-day, though they were but the children of an hour. 

1 love to think of those old days, so pleasant to remember. 

As on some stormy, wintry night, the yew-logs' glowing ember 

My mind sends drifting backward through the days that now are over. 

When we were boys and wandered here amid the grass and clover. 




AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. XI. 



AMHERST. MASS., APRIL 24, 1901, 



NO. 11 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will be sent 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT, 1902, Editor-in-Chief. 

LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, 1902, Business Manager. 

WILLIAM ETHERINGTON ALLEN, 1903, Assistant Business Manager. 
VICTOR ADOLPH GATES, 1902, Athletics. CHARLES MILTON KINNEY, 1902, Exchanges. 

RICHARD HENDRIC ROBERTSON, 1903, Department Notes. CLAUDE ISAAC LEWIS, 1902. 

NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN. 1903, College Notes. MYRON HOWARD WEST, 1903, Alumni Notes. 

FAYETTE DICKINSON COUDEN, 1904. ARTHUR LEE PECK, 1904. 

Terms: $1.00 per gear in adoance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside ofi United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot-Ball Association , 
College Boarding Club, 
Reading-Room Association, 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

D. N. WEST, Pres. Athletic Association, 

V. A. Gates, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

J. H. Chickering, Sec. Nineteen Hundred and Three Index, 

V. A. Gates, Sec. Fraternity Conference, 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec 
C. L. Rice, Manager. 
G. L. Barrus, Manager. 
C. E. Gordon, Sec. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



Edi-torials. 



In another column appears an article relative to a 
change of name of the college paper. It is needless 
to say that the question is one of the most important 
that has arisen, since it may lead to a complete change 
of policy on the part of the student body. It is not to 
be decided hastily, and we hope that it will be given 
the most careful consideration. 



We desire to remind the students of the social 
gathering in the Chapel next Friday evening. In tak- 
ing the initiative in the difficult problem of relieving 
our lack of social advantages the ladies of our faculty 
have earned for themselves the gratitude of every 
friend of the college. It behooves the student body to 
see that their efforts are crowned with success. 



A WORD as to the attendance of the students at our 
home games is perhaps needed. Our manager has 
been very fortunate in arranging his schedule in that 
nearly half of the games are to be played either on 



Pratt Field or on the college campus. It ought not 
to be necessary to remind the student body of their 
duty in such a case. There can be but few things 
more discouraging to a team at the beginning of its 
season than to notice a lack of support as manifested 
by a small attendance, yet this was precisely what 
occurred in the second game of the practice series. 
If the members of the team are able to sacrifice time 
each day for practice, it certainly seems as though the 
rest of us might at least make an effort to attend the 
regular scheduled games. 



The outlook for a creditable season in base ball is 
encouraging, and we wish the team all success. The 
temporary abandonment of track athletics, while 
deplorable in many ways, has at least had the advan- 
tage of concentrating all our energies on base ball. 
As a result greater interest in the sport is evident this 
spring than ever before. The schedule as announced 
is by far the best ever arranged. It includes many of 
the strongest college teams of New England and is an 
excellent testimonial to the improved standing of the 



142 



AGGIE LIFE, 



college. The practice series with Amherst resulted 
quite satisfactorily, the second game in particular show- 
ing a confidence, good judgment and steadiness at 
critical moments on the part of our team, the lack of 
which has lost many games for us in the past. The 
team is practically that of last year, the new material 
brought in is extremely promising, and with sufficient 
practice there is no reason why the nine should not 
make for itself a most creditable record. 



We publish elsewhere a brief abstract of the college 
catalogue. There seems to be little need for further 
editorial comment. The catalogue is essentially that 
of former years and the opinion of the student body is 
too well-known to need additional expression here. 
We suppose it must be economy to smother the eighty 
pages of the college catalogue proper under the weight 
of one hundred and forty of other irrelevant matter, 
though we notice it is not the course pursued by the 
most progressive institutions of the country. If the 
primary object of the catalogue is to serve as a sort 
of supplement to the Old Farmer's Almanac, or some 
similar publication, we judge it may be termed a suc- 
cess. But if as we supposed, the catalogue is the 
official representative, the agent, so to speak, of the 
college in the securing of new students, it must be con- 
fessed that there is plenty of room for improvement. 
We furthermore regard the lack of improvement as 
particularly unfortunate at this time. Last Commence- 
ment our alumni, feeling that a more aggressive policy 
in the obtaining of more students was desirable, 
appointed a committee of college advertising. This 
committee has raised a considerable sum of money 
and published at various times pamphlets presenting 
in attractive way the educational advantages of the 
college. These have been very widely distributed 
throughout the state and there can be no question that 
they have created an interest among prospective stu- 
dents. Could this work have been adequately supple- 
mented on the part of the college by a neat, compact 
and thoroughly artistic catalogue we feel sure that 
much good might have been done. As it is, a golden 
oppontunity has been lost and it remains to be seen 
whether the efforts of the alumni will not be more 
than counteracted by the unprepossessing appearance 
of the official catalogue. The college has been handi- 



capped from the start by the necessity of competing 
with older and more widely known institutions. The 
drawback is serious but still not insurmountable. It 
can be largely removed in time by liberal advertising. 
And what better advertisment can there be than an 
attractive catalogue thoroughly creditable to the institu- 
tion which it represents? 



ixerar 



THE CENTENARIAN. 

It does seem sort o'strange and queer. 

The old man's still a-sittin' here 

In the same old place, the same old cheer, 

While all the rest are dead and gone 

To live in that eternal home. 

Where I guess I soon will foller em on. 

There was eight on us once lived here. 

This, you see, used to be father's cheer, 

He and ma went in the very same year. 

Though both of 'em lived to a good old age. 

He v/as eighty years old when he turned the last page 

Of his Bible, and went to meet the " Great Sage." 

Then there was good old Uncle Nate, 

He left us in eighteen twenty-eight, 

He never had no children, and he never was yoked to a mate. 

Our " old bachelor uncle " he lived and died, 

That was one reason made me decide, 

Not to hitch to a wife, so I've never been tied. 

I was the eldest child of five, 

And yet I'm the last one left alive, 

And a-thrivin' yet, and likely to thrive. 

But that ain't strange; don't the " good book " say, 

" The last shall be first" to be weak and gray, 

" And the first shall be last " to be taken away. 

Yes, jest a century old to-day. 
And still feelin' young, and chipper and gay, 
T'wont be long now though 'fore I'm laid away. 
Yet I ain't c'that kind with one foot in the grave, 
I 'aint got but one foot and one leg anyway. 
Guess I'll go in head first, and let that one wave. 

Yes sirs, to-day jest a century old, 

*The year I was born was when the bells tolled 

And men prayed in the churches for Washington's soul. 

The next after me was brother John, 

He was born in eighteen hundred and one, 

And 'bout twenty months later, Sam come, the third son. 

Then a couple o'years after our movin' out here. 

From New York, the old state where I'd lived for eight year, 



AGGIE tlF^. 



M3 



Jane 'rived, the first girl, course that made her more dear. 
And the last and the best of us, dear little Dave, 
Neither doctors, nor nursin', nor physic could save; 
"And the last shall be first " to be laid in the grave. 

And John, he got killed in the Mexican war, 

— His wife and his one child had died long before — 

I went to the war too and saw fightin' galore. 

That's where my left leg was carried away. 

" Pretty hard on an old man," did somebody say ? 

I got well quick enough, but I can't kneel now to pray. 

And Jane left the old home for a man in Kentuck, 

Sam went back to New York, and they both had good luck 

'Till sixty-one come with its war; and that tuk 

The spirit out of 'em. They both lost a son. 

Most as soon as the fightin' at Sumpter was done. 

They gave to their country, Jane one, and Sam one. 

Neither one of 'em lived very long after that, 

Died 'thin a month of each other, and that 

Is why, now all that left is ' Old Nat;" 

And I've lived through the year o' the war with Spain 

When " Old Glory " come out on top again; 

And now I'm a willin' to lay down my cane. 

♦Written in '99. 



A TERRIBLE EXPERIENCE. 

"How near the camping place are we, George?" 
My brother asked me this question as we were canoe- 
ing up the Androskogin River one hot day last July. 
We were a party of four — my two cousins, brother and 
myself on a little fishing and hunting trip in Maine. 

"We have nearly two miles more to go and then 
we will pitch our camp." With the light load that we 
had, it didn't take long to travel two miles. As our 
party had camped together before, it took us only a 
short time to get things ready for night. After supper, 
we laid our plans for the morrow and then went to 
sleep. The next day passed quietly enough, and when 
evening came my brother, Edgar, and I took one of 
the canoes and paddled up stream for about four miles. 
Just before we started an old log driver told us to 
watch out for the logs. 

It was a beautiful summer night. The stars sparkled 
in the heavens; the trees cast their dark shadows out 
upon the water ; and the ripples caused by our canoe 
looked like long silver ribbons trailing in the water be- 
hind us. The morrow had not risen when we arrived 
at our fishing ground. 

The river was very wide, almost a lake at this 
point. At the upper end of this lake a small island 



caused the current to split and flow close to each 
bank. Thus we were in comparatively still water, be- 
ing near the middle. 

The fish were biting very well. My brother had 
made some big catches. Although I was fascinated 
with the sport, I could not help noticing the dull splash- 
ings and bumpings that came from both shores. I 
was able to see nothing because of the pitchy darkness, 
but I was conscious of a nervous feeling that had 
crept all over me. Becoming uneasy, I spoke to 
Edgar about it. He laughed and went on with his fish- 
ing. 

I became more and more uneasy. What was I to 
do I Finally, I worked myself up to such a state that 
I became desperate. "Come, Edgar, something's 
wrong. We must get out of here." " Well, if you say 
so, I suppose we must go. You can take the stern on 
the way down." 

We reeled up our lines and dipped our paddles into 
the water. The canoe went along all right for a little 
while, but soon I began to have trouble to keep the 
bow from veering off. We had struck a cross current 
that was not there when we came up. This served to 
increase my nervousness. 

When we got down towards the narrows, we came 
upon a log evary now and then. I cautioned Edgar 
to look out for them, because if we should run into 
one, it would sink us. 

In spite of all my cautions, I think he must have 
lapsed into a dream, for as we paddled along he was 
very silent. Suddenly, he began to shout and try to 
turn the canoe up stream. He succeeded in bringing 
it around broadside, when I saw not twenty paces in 
front of me a writhing mass of logs and foaming water. 

I thought we were doomed. There we were right 
in the jaws of a monster that was only waiting to 
destroy us. I yelled to my brother to paddle for his 
life. Then I exerted myself as I never had done be- 
fore. V/e paddled; we strained; we put every bit of 
muscle into our paddles, which bent like bows, in our 
frantic efforts to stem that current which would have 
carried us death. 

After what seemed a never ending period of time, I 
could see that we were gaining inch by inch. I 
shouted a word of encouragement to Edgar and that 
seemed to give him new life. 

Slowly, but surely, we were steadily pulling away 



144 



AGGIE LIFE 



from an awful death. We were both nerved up to 
superhuman efforts, and after a terrible struggle, we 
succeeded in gaining still water. 

This was not the end of our trouble. We were out 
o4 those jaws of death, but we were still surrounded by 
uncanny floating monsters. We must do something 
very soon or they will be in on us. Swimming would 
not help us in any way, and neither of us knew how to 
step the logs as the drivers do. We decided that we 
must crawl across them. 

The logs ran smoothly on each side of this lake 
until the two currents met at the lower narrows. Then 
there was a terrible disturbance. We thought that if 
we crossed one stream of them, we could get on shore 
easily enough. 

But we had reckoned without our host. We didn't 
stop to think that we must cross in utter darkness. 
Nevertheless, we started. The first thing I did was to 
creep over a few big logs and fall into the water. As 
I took the lead, Edgar was able to come along after 
me more easily. 

I think we must have been nearly an hour crossing 
that narrow stream of logs. After many falls and 
bruises, we succeeded in reaching the precious land, 
weak and exhausted. Removing some of our wet 
clothes, we lay down under a large fir tree and fell 
asleep. When we awoke, the sun was high in the 
heaven. As we were dressing, our cousins appeared. 
They had been searching all the morning for us. 
Edgar and I will remember that terrible night as long 
as we live. 



SHALL THE NAME OE THE COLLEGE 
PAPER BE CHANGED? 

Toward the close of the last term numerous com- 
plaints were made to members of the Life board that 
the present name of the college paper was unsatisfac- 
tory. To ascertain the extent of the dissatisfaction, on 
April 5th a test vote of the student body was taken in 
mass meeting on the following question : " Do you think 
that a change in the name of the college paper would 
be for the best interests of the college?'' No time 
was available for discussion, the idea being simply to 
get the individual opinions of the students. The result 
of the ballot showed 52 in the affirmative and 24 in 
the negative. The editors then met and considered 
the matter, finally deciding to hold the matter open 



for discussion till May 27th, getting as many opinions 
as possible, and then to decide definitely whether fur- 
ther action was desirable. Accordingly, we now sub- 
mit the question to our subscribers, hoping to hear 
from- all, and especially the alumni. The columns of 
the paper are thrown open for discussion, and we shall 
be glad to receive communications on the subject. 

The objections to the present title apply, we believe, 
almost entirely to the use of the word "Aggie." It is 
held that either the term is a contraction of the word 
"agricultural," and signifies it, or else that it is a 
mere corruption of no meaning whatever. If the lat- 
ter case is true, then it should be abolished as useless. 
If the former, it is objected that the use of the word 
gives undue prominence to a single branch of our 
studies, thereby misleading the general public by dis- 
regarding the other important lines of education 
offered by the institution. It is also thought that as a 
sort of nickname, the term is not sufficiently dignified 
for official use. According to this view, the change 
of name in the college paper would logically be fol- 
lowed by a change in the college song and yell, and in 
fact by a complete dropping of the word "Aggie" from 
our college vocabulary. This is clearly implied in the 
1901 Index, when it says : " It is to be hoped that the 
college will adopt a new yell for Massachusetts, and 
give to agriculture, in connection with our athletics, a 
less prominent place. Is there any sense in introduc- 
ing into our yells one of subjects of study and entirely 
neglecting the State that supports and owns the col- 
lege ? Massachusetts is far more dignified and appro- 
priate." 

The opposition to a change in name is based on two 
reasons. First, it is argued that the name has become 
established by long years of use and cannot easily be 
dropped. The paper has made a reputation for itself 
among the alumni, the advertisers and the college 
world under its present name, the advantages of 
which would be lost if a new name were adopted. 
Considerable trouble and expense would also be neces- 
sary, and it is feared that from a financial standpoint 
a change would be disastrous for many years. The 
second reason given is that the present name is dis- 
tinctive. The official title of the college is long and 
cumbersome ; the contraction is short and specific. It 
has come to stand for the college just as "Tech" does 
for M. I. T. To change would be to run the risk of 



AGGIE LIFE. 



MS 



confusion, and thereby injure the college more seri- 
ousl> than the present title can do. According to this 
view, is it not the best plan to "let well enough 
alone ? " 

Such, briefly stated, are we to believe the main argu- 
ments on both sides. It is evident that the students 
at present favor a change, and so far as we could 
learn, it is the desire of practically all of the members 
of the Faculty. In case this call for opinions meets 
with little or no response, we must conclude that our 
alumni are either indifferent or else have no objec- 
tions to the change being made. In this case, the 
wishes of the students will almost certainly prevail. 
We hope, however, for a general expression of opinion, 
that the board may ascertain accurately the prevailing 
sentiment and act accordingly. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE YOUNG MEN'S 
CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

During the past year the Young Men's Christian 
Association has endeavored to follow the principles of 
the great movement of which it is a part in building 
up a clean, strong, manly character in its members 
and in advancing the Kingdom of God in this college. 

The hand-book was published as usual during the 
spring term and the edition was exhausted before the 
demand for it had ceased. Five representatives of 
the Association attended all or a part of the sessions 
of the Northfield Student Conference, which proved 
to be the largest ever held. The enthusiastic report 
brought back by these delegates as to the deep spirit- 
ual blessings received and the good times enjoyed 
should convince anyone that there is no more ideal 
place in which to spend a ten days' outing than at 
Northfield, where every need of body, mind and spirit 
is remembered and ministered unto. The delegates 
were Messrs. Franklin, Tottingham, Dacy, Bridgeforth 
and Hinds. 

Four Bible classes have been maintained through- 
out the year and one for the Winter Course men dur- 
ing last term. The average attendance upon the Bible 
classes for the year has been 22. The increased 
interest in this department of the work is very encour- 
aging. The leaders for the classes have been as fol- 
lows : Senior Class, Professor F. S. Cooley; Junior, 
Dr. G. S. Walker; Sophomore, Professor S. F. How- 
ard ; Freshman, Messrs. J. B. Knight and W. E. 



Hinds; Short Winter Course, Mr. B. H. Stackpole. 

The devotional meetings have been held as usual 
through the year with an average attendance of 19 ; in 
addition to the regular meetings nine speakers have 
addressed the Association. 

The budget this year is somewhat larger than usual. 
$70.29 has been received from student members and 
others who are interested in the work ; $49.00 has 
been pledged or paid by members of our Faculty, and 
$18.00 has been given by Alumni and friends, who 
thankfully remember the help which they received 
from the Association while they were in college. In 
addition to these sums, the Association wishes to 
express its thanks for gifts to Mr. M. H. Munson for a 
desk for the secretary's room, to Miss Mabelle Paul 
of Lynn, Mass. and Mrs. Levi Stockbridge of Am- 
herst, through whose kindness the Association received 
a large portrait of D. L. Moody ; also to Mr. B. K. 
Jones, '96, Mr. A. F. Burgess, '95, Dr. H. T. Fer- 
nald and Professor R. S. Lull for smaller, but no less 
acceptable, donations. 

COMMUNICATION. 

Editor-in-Chief, Aggie Life, 

Dear Sir : — Will you kindly insert the follow- 
ing in your next issue : 

In the preparation of the material for the last Aggie 
Life, and for the reprint made for advertising purposes, 
great credit is due the members of the Alumni 
Advertising Committee, who took upon themselves 
nearly the entire burden of its arrangement and the 
successful completion of the enterprise. 

Yours truly, 
Clarence E. Gordon. 



LECTURES. 

The fourth lecture under the direction of the 
Natural History Society was given in the Chapel Fri- 
day evening, March 1, by Dr. H. B. Loomis of 
Amherst College. His very interesting subject, " Evo- 
lution of North America," was well illustrated by 
maps of the continents in different geological ages and 
by restorations. 

Our earth is supposed to have been a quantity of 
gas thrown from the sun. As this gas began to 
revolve and liquefy a crust formed and as it cooled it 
began to shrink and immense wrinkles were formed 
which we designate as mountains, 



146 



AGGIE LIFE. 



The age of the world is estimated at one hundred 
million years. At that time nearly everything was 
under water. The American continent then consisted 
of what is now New England, the Central states and 
a small portion of Canada. 

About seventy-five million years ago plants made 
their first appearance. These were of a very low 
order. The animals of this period were jelly fish and 
single-celled animals. 

All this time the land had been rising and forming 
inland lakes and swamps. Thirty million years ago 
the land where the Appalachian mountains now are 
was greatly disturbed, the swamps were buried and as 
a result the great coal beds were formed. After a 
period of sixteen million years the North American 
continent extended to California. Two million years 
after this the Rocky mountains were formed and the 
higher forms of life made their appearance. 

On Friday evening, March 8, Prof. John Tyler of 
Amherst College gave a very interesting lecture on 
" The Survival of the Fittest." 

The speaker first explained the gladiatorial theory 
which for a long time was considered the only correct 
one. It is the theory that the form fittest to survive 
is the one which can procure the most food, repro- 
duce the fastest and can tread down all enemies. 
But this theory does not seem to hold true. 

Beginning with the early paleological history we 
find three forms of life : the molluscs, the Crustacea 
and also a small worm-like form. 

In the Carboniferous age the continents had risen 
and the air was purified and made suitable for breath- 
ing by the land animals. The molluscs had made 
little progress. The Crustacea had developed a good 
deal and from them came the insects. But the 
future seemed to lie with the descendants of the 
worm. Of these there were the reptiles which were 
magnificent in development. The birds, which had 
not reached their highest development, and a small 
omniverous animal about the size of a rabbit were 
also found. No one would probably have selected the 
small animal as the fittest to survive. For several 
reasons the first would have been chosen. 

In the next period which was the Tertiary the Rep- 
tiles have disappeared, the birds have gained very 
little and are entirely outclassed by the descendants 
of the small mammai. The forms with dagger canine 



teeth now appeared. Of all families we probably 
would have picked out the cat as the fittest. The cat 
outstrips man in everything but in brain development. 

There seems to be some law of fitness, just what is 
not known. It is evident that the form which is fit- 
test to survive is the one which has not reached its 
fullest development. Nature says " move on " and 
the form which does this is the fittest to survive. 

The last lecture of the course was delivered March 
15, by Prof. George Dimmock of Springfield. He 
chose for his subject " Some Curious Relations 
between Plants and Animals. 

There are some plants which actually digest ani- 
mals. The Venus's Fly-trap is a good example, also 
the Caltha. Experiments made with the Drosera 
proved that this plant, when fed with meat or flies, 
gained twenty-one per cent, in growth. 

It is a well-known fact that insects aid in fertiliza- 
tion. Insects in search of honey carry the pollen 
from one plant to another. Water plants are often 
fertilized by some of the lower forms of animals such 
as the Vorticelli. The house-fly carries around the 
bacteria of typhoid, cholera and yellow fever, 
^hile it has been proved that the mosquito is respon- 
sible for the spread of malaria. Such plants as the 
Burdock and Devil's Pitch-fork are disseminated by 
attaching themselves to the fur or wool of passing 
animals. 

Plants are protected by animals. The nests of 
white ants contain material which gives rise to the 
growth of a certain fungus which the ant afterward 
uses as food. Leaf-cutting ants deposit the leaves in 
their nest and from the leaves a fungus grows. 

In the East and in southera Europe, ants are known 
to harvest the grain. In Texas there is an ant which 
cultivates a certain kind of grass the seed of which it 
afterward uses as food. 

Some ants live on plants and protect them fro m 
other insects. The Scapira tree makes provision in 
its structure for the ants. A weak spot is left here 
and there through which the ants enter and deposit 
their eggs. The young ants after hatching feed on 
the juicy pith. If an enenmy approaches these ants 
swarm out in great numbers and protect the tree. 



The University of Chicago is to have a new $200,- 
000 club house for the use of students. 



AGGIE LIFEo 



147 



THE COLLEGE CATALOGUE. 

The college catalogue does not differ very essen- 
tially from those of former years. The President's 
report announces the deaths of John D. W. French 
and James S. Grinnell from the board of trustees and 
of Percy F. Felch and George C. Clarke from the 
student body. Forty men entered the freshman class, 
and the total shows a slight gain most marked in the 
graduate department. George F. Babb has been 
added to the corps of instructors. For the purpose of 
lengthening the summer vacation the college year has 
been re-divided into two semesters instead of three 
terms as formerly. The library has been increased 
by gift and purchase, 1,625 volumes making a total of 
21,665. The exhibit of the college at the Pan-Amer- 
ican Exposition is described in detail. An appropria- 
tion of $23,100 is asked for, to be used in repairing 
and repainting the college buildings, providing suitable 
bathing facilities in the Drill Hall, and most of all for 
a new boarding-house. 

The total number of students is placed at 186, 
divided as follows: Graduate courses 14, graduates of 
1900,23, seniors 30, juniors 25, sophomores 41, 
freshmen 39, winter course 9 and resident graduates 
12. 

The requirements for admission have been raised 
by the requirement of the whole of plane geometry 
instead of the first two books only, and of general 
history in place of United States History, Political 
Geography, Arithmetic and the Metric System are 
no longer required. The courses of study have been 
somewhat changed to correspond to the semester 
system and new courses in French, German, Geology 
and Zoology added to the curriculum. 

The financial outlook is satisfactory. The total 
receipts for the year were $82,510.85 and the ex- 
penditures $74,070.29. The amount paid for sala- 
ries was $29,160.00 and for advertising $269.33. 
The total valuation is about $350,000. 



OUR EXHIBIT AT BUFFALO. 

A considerable portion of the Agricultural Exhibit 
of Massachusetts, for the Pan-American Exposition 
to be held in Buffalo this summer, has been arranged 
and prepared by the College under the direction of 
the Agricultural, the Horticultural, and the Botanical 
departments. The exhibit of the Agricultural de- 



partment consists of thirty colored plates, forty-two by 
thirty inches in size, drawn by C. A. Tinker of the 
sophomore class, and showing diagrammatically the 
agricultural statistics of Massachusetts as compared 
with those of the principal agricultural states of the 
Union. Among these are charts showing the acreage 
devoted to cultivation and pasturage, the amount of 
live stock, dairy animals and dairy produce ; the 
amounts of grain raised, — wheat, oats, rye, and corn; 
the hay crop, potato crop, tobacco crop, cranberry crop 
and apple crop. The work being done for the promo- 
tion and encouragement of Agriculture is also shown : 
the number of agricultural societies, the total mem- 
bership, the number of agricultural fairs and the num- 
ber and valuation of prizes awarded for agricultural 
exhibits. 

The Horticultural department has prepared a case 
containing plaster casts, modeled by Prof. S. T. May- 
nard, showing the original fruit and the present fruits 
as improved from the original by care and cultivation. 
The models are colored and resemble the fruit which 
they represent very closely. 

The exhibit arranged by the Botanical department 
shows sixty specimens of the common trees of Massa- 
chusetts. The most common trees were chosen and 
a typical tree selected and photographed when naked 
and in foliage. Three sections of the wood were 
obtained, radical, transverse and tangential. The 
sections are about four by two and a half inches in 
size and are of about the thickness of writing paper. 
They show beautifully the grain and rings of the wood. 
The specimens are each arranged in a vertical 
column, with the sections of the wood at the top. 
immediately under that the photograph of the naked 
tree, and the tree in foliage and under all a label bear- 
ing the common name and the botanical name of the 
tree. Three specimens are framed together in a 
heavy oak frame with a Flemish finish. The photo- 
graphs and sections are surrounded by a mat of a 
neutral tinge. The top of the frame bears a general 
label, " Massachusetts Trees," in black letters on a 
gilt background. There are twenty frames in all, 
each frame being two and one-half by three feet in 
Size. 

The department has also framed and sent to the 
fair nine plates drawn by Prof. R. E. Smith, illustra- 
ting Bulletin 55 of the Hatch Experiment Station, 



148 



AGGIE LIFE. 



The plates are pen and ink drawings of a microscopic 
worm, the Nematodes, which is very injurious to the 
cucumber and tomato in the plant houses. They 
show the complete development of the worm in all its 
different stages from the egg to the adult ; also the 
different species and the infested root of the diseased 
plant. 

Two soil charts of Massachusetts have been pre- 
pared : one showing the mechanical analysis of six 
typical soils from six different localities in a line 
across the state ; the other, six highly specialized crop 
soils. An outline map of the state was mounted in 
the center of a large frame and around it were ar- 
ranged the six soils mechanically analysed and 
mounted in vials to show the analysis. Each analysis 
requires nine vials, one to show the amount of organic 
matter, and one for each of the eight portions of the 
soil separated according to the diameter of the grains, 
the largest being the gravel, or grains of from two to 
one millimeter in diameter and the smallest being the 
clay, the grains of which are from .005 to .0001 milli- 
meter in diameter. On the map the soils were 
located. The localities selected for the first chart 
were Eastham, Bridgewater, Natick, Spencer, Am- 
herst and Pittsfield. The crop soils selected were 
the asparagus soils of Orleans and Concord, the let- 
tuce soils of Arlington and Worcester, the onion soil 
of Sunderland and the tobacco soil of Hatfield. 



NOTICE. 

Aggie Life Special No. 2, containing 
statements of value to all persons in- 
terested in college education, will be 
sent to addresses forwarded to the 
undersigned committee until the sup- 
ply is exhausted. 

Alumni Advertising Committee, 
Amherst, Mass. 



JUNIOR CHEMICAL TRIP AND BANQUET. 

The Juniors combined business and pleasure when 
on April 18th they took their annual chemical trip with 
Dr. Wellington to Springfield and vicinity and then 
wound up the program by a rousing banquet in the 
evening. The party left Amherst at 8-15, proceeding 
by trolley to Mt. Tom station. Here the mills of the 
Mt. Tom Sulphite Pulp Company were inspected and 



the various stages in the production of wood pulp from 
spruce logs observed in detail. The train was then 
taken to Holyoke where the manufacture of writing- 
paper was observed in the mills of the Parson's Writing 
Paper Co. The party dined at the Cooley House in 
Springfield, spending the remainder of the day in that 
city at the plant of the Springfield Brewing Co., the 
Springfield Arsenal, and other points of interest. 

In the evening at the Cooley House came the ban- 
quet tendered to the Juniors each year by the Fresh- 
men. Every member of the class was present and the 
affair was thoroughly successful. L. C. Claflin served 
as toastmaster and toasts were responded to as follows : 
•'The Class," J. C.Hall ; " Women, Wine and Money," 
R. W. Morse ; " College Fossils," C. E. Dwyer ; 
" Only a Boy," E. F. McCobb ; " The stray sheep of 
the college fold," S. L. Smith ; " V. A. Gates ; " Life 
and its Vicissitudes," H. L. Knight ; " The Class of 
'04," A. L. Dacy. 

Much credit for the success of the day is due the 
committee of arrangements, V. A. Gates, R. W. 
Morse and C. E. Dwyer. 



Colle;^^ ISIot^S- 



— All out for baseball. 

— M. F. Ahearn, ex-'Ol, has again entered College. 
— Gilbert of Brookfield has entered the freshman 
class. 

— The special edition of Aggie Life is now ready 
for distribution. 

— An attempt is being made to form a prohibition 
club among the students. 

— A tax of $3.50 has been levied on the students 
to support the baseball team. 

— Couden and Peck, 1904, have been assigned 
positions on the Aggie Life Board. 

— A complimentary banquet given by 1904 to the 
Juniors was held at Springfield April 18th. 

— Victor Gates has been elected to the position of 
reading-room director in place of H. L. Knight re- 
signed. 

— The junior class visited the Springfield breweries 
last week under the supervision of Dr. Wellington of 
the Chemical department, 



AGGIE LIFE. 



J 49 



— The annual catalogue and report of the Mass. 
Agrl'l college for 1901 has made its appearance. 

— Capt. Anderson has recovered from his recent 
illness and is again able to attend to his duties as 
commandant. 

— That band of freshmen, popularly known as the 
" Sagamore Seven " have leased, and are now occu- 
pying the house No. 62 Pleasant St. 

— The senior class have elected the following offi- 
cers for this term : Pres't, Gamwell ; sec'y and treas., 
Chickering ; sergeant-at-arms, N. Hunting. 

— The State committee on location of College 
buildings recently visited the college for the purpose 
of choosing a site for a new boarding-house. 

— On April 1 1 , Aggie was defeated by Amherst in 
a practice game of ball the score being 5-2, but on 
the 18th the tables were turned, the score being 
Aggie 2, ^Amherst 0. 

— It is with pleasure that we note the great im- 
provement of the College band. Its enrollment has 
been increased and altogether the band presents a 
very fine appearance. 

— R. D. Gilbert, '00, has assumed the duties of G. 
F, Parmenter as instructor of Chemistry. Mr. Par- 
menter has been appointed assistant chemist in the 
experiment station at Kingston, R. I. 

— The reading-room directors for this term are : 
Juniors, H. A. Paul, H. L. Knight, A. L. Dacy; 
sophomores, W. W. Peebles, R. H. Robertson, E, B. 
Snell ; freshmen, F. D. Couden and A. 'L. Peck. 

— Following is the list of officers for the junior class 
for the spring term : Pres't, R. W. Morse ; vice-pres- 
ident, J. H. Belden ; sec'y and treas., J. C. Hall; 
sergeant-at-arms, H. E. Hodgkiss ; baseball captain, 
V. A. Gates. 

— The ladies of the faculty are to hold a reception 
and informal -gathering in the chapel Friday evening. 
Many young ladies from Smith college, Amherst and 
near-by towns have been invited so that a large atten- 
dance is assured. 

— The officers of the class of 1903 for the spring 
term are : Pres't, E. B. Snell ; vice pres't, S. C. 
Bacon ; sec'y and treas., G. D. Jones ; sergeant-at- 
arms, P. W. Brooks ; class captain, G. L. Barrus. 
P. W. Brooks was chosen baseball captain. 



— The class of 1904 have elected officers for this 
term as follows : Pres't, H. D. Newton; vice-pres't, 
R. P. Gay ; sec'y and treas., J. W. Gregg ; sergeant- 
at-arms, A. F. Haffenreffer ; class captain, J, Kelli- 
ker ; baseball captain, J. Cummings. 

The class pipe chosen by the Sophomores consists 
of a French briar bowl with an amber mouth-piece. 
The bowl is decorated with an " M " over which are 
the numerals 1903 engraved in the wood. Altogether 
the pipe makes a very attractive ornament. 

— The senior class have elected the following com- 
mittees for the Commencement exercises: General 
committee, Gamwell, Whitman, Wilson, Brooks, 
Hunting, Leslie, Todd chairman ; committee on class 
bed and class tree, Hunting chairman, Dawson, Chick- 
ering, Tashjian, Pearson, Smith ; committee on invi- 
tations. Whitman ; class ivy, Pearson. 



/ItMetic f^oifs. 



The prospects for a successful season is at the pres- 
ent time very encouraging. A very good schedule 
has been arranged and a goodly number of men have 
presented themselves as candidates. The make up 
of the team is at present about the same as that of 
last year with the exception of two new men. Cum- 
mings at first, is showing up very well. Graves who 
played first last year is now playing in the field. Gregg 
at third handles himself very well and will probably 
make a good man for the position. Bowler shows 
remarkable improvement in pitching and promises to 
make a good man. Paul at second and Ahearn at 
short are both playing good ball and will probably play 
those positions through the season. Bodfish the cap- 
tain and pitcher is playing his same good game as of 
last year. Henry at catch needs lots of practice. 
Amherst, 5 ; Aggie, 2. 

The first game of the season was played on the 
campus on Thursday, April 11th, with Amherst. It 
was the first of the two practice games and as both 
teams were out for the first time the playing was loose 
and erratic. The batting of both teams was very poor 
Amherst getting only three, and Aggie four hits. The 
features of this game was the pitching of Bowler and 
playing of Paul and Ahearn for Aggie and Rushmore 
and Shay for Amherst. 



ISO 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Innings, 
Amherst, 
Aggie, 



12 3 4 5 6 7 
2 3 0—5 
2 0—2 

Aggie 2; Amherst 0. 



In the second practice game Aggie defeated Annherst 
by a score of 2-0. The Aggie team showed marked 
improvement in both team work and batting while 
Amherst was slow and at times did not know what to 
do. Bowler did the twirling for Aggie and did very 
well, holding Amherst down to five hits. Dunleavey 
did the pitching for Am.herst, allowing only four hits. 
Amherst several times had men on third, but was pre- 
vented from scoring by the good playing of the Aggie 
team. An error and two hits in the fourth inning gave 
Aggie the only two runs of the game. Paul reaches 
first on a hit and steals second. Cook gets first on 
base on balls. Cummings then hits the ball to Chase 
who allows it to go by, Cummings reaching first and 
Paul going home and Cook reaching third. On a hit 
by Ahearn, Cook scores, making a total of two runs. 
The features of the game were the playing of Paul and 
Cummings and the pitching of Bowler for Aggie and 
King and Shay for Amherst. 







Amherst. 
















A.B. R. 


B. 




P.O. 


A. 


E. 


sturgis, 

Bartlett, 

Dunleavy, 

King, 

Chase, 

Couch, 

Shay. 

Hawley, 

Field, 




3 
3 

2 

3 

2 

3 
3 
2 
2 

Aggie. 


1 

2 





1 
1 







7 


2 

4 





1 

1 
1 





1 







1 




3 






A.B R. 


B, 




P.O. 


A. 


E. 


Paul, 

Pierson, 

Cook, 

Cummings, 

Graves, 

Harris, 

Bowler, 

Gregg. 

Bodfish, 




3 ! 
2 

1 1 

2 

3 
3 
2 
2 



1 





1 









2 


I 
7 
2 

1 
1 
1 



3 



1 


2 
1 



1 










Innings, 




1 2 


3 


4 


5 






Aggie, 
Amherst, 
















2—2 

0-0 








BASE 


BALL SCHEDULI 




April 1 1 


Amherst. 














" 15, 


Amherst. 














" 22, 


Amherst. 














" 24, 


Wesleyan 


at Middletown. 












May 4, 


Storrs at Amherst. 












" 9, 


Middlebury at Amherst. 












" 10, 


Middlebury at Amherst. 












" 14, 


Univ. of Maine at Amherst. 











" 21, Univ. of Vermont at Amherst. 
" 30, Trinity at Hartford. 
June 4, Vermont Academy at Saxons River, 

5, Middlebury at Middlebury. 

6, Univ. Vermont at Burlington. 

7, Univ. Norwich at Northfield. 
'.' 15, Storrs at Storrs. 



umna. 



'71. — G. H. T. Babbitt is now in the employ of the 
Chicopee M'f'g Co. 

'83.— Dr. H. J. Wheeler, chemist of the Rhode 
Island Experiment station, spent a few days in town 
recently. 

Ex-'84. — A. W. Lublin is with the Kora Company, 
525-527 Broome Stfeet, New York. 

'87.: — Wm. Hunting Caldwell, Clover Ridge farm, 
Peterboro, N. H. 

'90. — Rev. J. S. West has recently accepted a 
call as pastor to the Baptist church at Belchertown, 
Mass. 

'91,— E. P. Felt, New York State Entomologist^ 
lectured before the Massachusetts Fruit Growers' 
Association last month at Worcester on •' Recent 
problems in the control of insects depredating on fruit 
trees." 

'92. — E. C. Howard spent a few days in town 
a few days since. 

'92. — Word has lately been received of the mar- 
riage of Chas. M. Dickinson to Miss Genenier Pritch- 
ard as Seattle, Washington. Mr. Dickinson is in the 
wholesale cut-flower business. Address 76 Wabash 
Ave., Chicago, 111. 

'94, — Chas. H. Higgins is again occupying his old 
position, having charge of the Ontremant Experiment 
station. Address 6 Union Ave., Montreal. 

'94. — Dr, Bacon was in town recently. 

'95. — Jasper Marsh, Consolidated Electric Light 
Co., Danvers, Mass. 

'96. — B. K. Jones has recently entered the law of- 
fice of Walter S. Robinson, Springfield, Mass. Ad- 
dress 60 Temple St. 

'96.— S. W. Fletcher, Pullman, Wash. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



151 



'96. — It is with great pleasure that we announce 
the birth of a daughter, Natalie, to Mr. and Mrs. L. 
J. Shepard. 

'96. — H. T. Edwards, 118 Barrister's hall, Boston, 
Mass, 

'96.— Fred H. Read, 1168 Elmwood Ave., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 

'96.— Geo. W. Pasell, 257 Mt. Pleasant St., New 
Bedford, Mass. 

'96. — Frank L. Clapp has resigned his position un- 
der the Metropolitan Water Board to accept a simi- 
lar position under the city engineer of Waterbury, 
Conn. For the next two years he expects to be en- 
gaged raising the Wigwam dam and enlarging the 
reservoir which supplies the city of Waterbury. Ad- 
dress, box 233, Thomaston, Conn. 

'97.— C. A. Norton, 30 Grave St., Lynn, Mass. 

'97. — H. J. Armstrong was in town reccently. 

'97. — We are pleased to announce the marriage 
engagement of Philip H. Smith to Miss Edith Stev- 
ens, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S. Stevens of Am- 
herst. 

'99. — W. E. Hinds gave an illustrated lecture be- 
rore the Springfield Zoological club recently on "A 
group of curious little insects, unnoticed but not un- 
common." 

'99. — Wm. H. Armstrong, superintendent of schools 
at San Juan, Porto Rico, recently had a narrow es- 
cape from personal violence at the hands of an en- 
raged mob of natives. It was only by the prompt ac- 
tion of five artillery men that Mr. Armstrong was res- 
cued. The trouble arose from the fact that while the 
superintendent was harmlessly correcting a 10 years 
old girl her dress caught on a desk and was slightly 
torn. She reported to her mother that she had been 
abused, and a fracas immediately followed. 

'00. — Geo. Parmenter has accepted a position as 
assistant in the Rhode Island Experiment station. 
Address Kingston, R. I. 

'00. — F. Guy Stanley of Harvard Medical school, 
lately paid a visit to this College. 

'00. — A. F. Frost has been spending the last few 
weeks in town, 

Ex-'OO. — Clayton Erastus Risley married to Minnie 
Mae Post, Feb. 14th at Walton, N. Y, 



'95. — D. C. Potter, landscape engineer has about 
finished his work on the Pope estate at Farmington, 
Conn. The new house is nearly ready for occupancy 
and the estate will soon be turned over to the super- 
intendent who will be A. B. Cook, '96. 

'95. — A. D. Hemenway has by the burning of his 
father's house on the morning of Feb. 24, suffered 
the loss of nearly all his books, college collections and 
private effects, including what he valued most, his 
class pictures, his parents barely escaping with the 
clothing they wore. Hence the class of '95 is hereby 
called on by one of its members to show sympathy 
and do what is possible to lighten Mr. Hemenway's 
loss, by as promptly as may be, sending him pictures 
of themselves, either the old class pictures taken in 
'95, if they still have such, and if not, any subsequent 
pictures of themselves. Address, Prof. H. D. Hem- 
enway, School of Horticulture, Hartford, Conn. 

VETERINARY LABORATORY. 

The barrenness of the Veterinary Laboratory 
grounds is to be at last relieved. The senior class in 
Horticulture are making plans for the laying out and 
decoration of the land in that vicinity. Trees and 
shrubs are to be planted and the bareness, now ex- 
isting there, removed. One of the finest buildings on 
the college grounds will thus be made as pleasing to 
the eye and artistic sense as any of the others. As 
this will be one of the most lasting and beneficial works 
of our senior class, exceptional results are expected. 

Dr. Paige has made an offer which will be of inter- 
est to horse owners in this vicinity. Every Wednes- 
day afternoon, from 3-30 to 5-00 o'clock he will be 
at the laboratory and will give free treatment to all 
horses brought to him during that time. 

MILITARY DEPATRMENT. 
Captain Anderson in his report in the catalog rec- 
ommends that provision be made for an annual en- 
campment of one week during which time special 
facilities would be offered for field exercises, such as 
extended order drill, duties of sentinels, target prac- 
tice and castramentation. He believes tentage and 
equipment can be borrowed from the Adjutant-Gen- 
eral of the Commonwealth. The most favorable 



152 



AGGIE LIFE. 



time for the encampment would be about the middle 
of May. This matter of annual encampment has 
been recommended heretofore in the reports of the 
Inspector-General to the Secretary of War. 

He also recommends the purchase of a new silk 
flag for the battalion, so that it may be carried with 
the national colors on occasions of ceremony. The 
cost will be about twenty-eight dollars. 

He recommends that the college give the band 
every encouragement within its means, and that a 
small appropriation for distinctive trimmings for the 
present uniforms be made. 

Many needed improvements have been made in 
the drill-hall building during the past summer. A 
toilet room has been put in, also water pipes for heat- 
ing placed in the lecture room and commandant's 
office. The whole exterior building needs painting, 
which the captain recommends to be done during the 
coming year and there should be shower baths near 
the drill hall, which is also used as a gymnasium. 

EXPERIMENT STATION. 

During the past four years experiments have been 
carried on at the Experiment Station working out to 
a solution of the causes and remedies for the diseases 
of the Aster. Last year three hundred and fifty 
varieties were grown ; this year one hundred and fifty 
of the best were chosen, and the work continued with 
these. This plant is affected by a number of serious 
diseases, three of which are of fungus nature, and are 
readily understood ; but one disease of a very distinc- 
tive effect is as yet beyond the skill of the depart- 
ment. No organism of any kind appears to be the 
cause of it, and it is in every way of a peculiarly 
obscure nature. 

Lettuce and cucumbers are being experimented 
on in endeavoring to arrive at conclusions concerning 
the diseases of those plants. Last year a bulletin 
was issued, giving an account of the work on this 
subject. In the disease of the lettuce, known as the 
" drop," results have been obtained which show form- 
erly unknown characteristics in the development of 
the organism, on the basis of which knowledge, a 
practical treatment can be applied. 

CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 
George F. Parmenter has resigned the position of 
instructor in the chemical laboratory to accept an 



appointment as assistant chemist at the Experiment 
Station, Kingston, R. I. R. D. Gilbert of the class 
of 1900 has taken the position vacated by Mr. Par- 
menter, Mr. Gilbert is one of the most efficient 
chemists of those who have held this position, and 
was one of the best liked and most popular members 
of the class of 1900 ; it is hoped that he will continue 
to fill the situation for sometime to come. 
LIBRARY. 
The following books have been added recently to 
the library : Three works on Botany, " Plant Rela- 
tions," by Coulta; "Agricultural Botany," by Perci- 
val ; '• Organography of Plants," by Goebel ; " Ameri- 
can Workmen," a volume on Political Economy; 
"A Treatise on Zoology," by Cankaster, in three 
volumes, the last one is yet unpublished ; " Birds of 
Springfield and vicinity," by Robert O. Morris ; 
" Squirrels and Other Fur Bearers," by John Bur- 
roughs ;" The Mushroom Book," by Nina L. Marsh- 
all ; " Uncle Terry," by Munn ; " Eleanor," by Mrs. 
Humphrey Ward. Ten more histories of towns have 
also been placed on the library shelves. 



'9 



DRAWING AND BLUE PROCESS PAPERS, 

SCALES, ANGLES, CURVES and T SQUARES, 

ARCHITECTS' AND DRAFTMEN'S COLORS, 

SCHOOL BOXES WATER COLORS, 



T 



INCORPORATED, 
82 and 84 Washington St., "l -RnQTOM 
216 and 218 Clarendon St., j -"^^■^^^^* 



Factories, MALDBN, MASS. 



(Dassaehusetts figpieultuPal College. 

AT THE 

OOLiLEaiS FARM 



WE HAVE PURE BRED 



Pfi 



J 

And we beg t© announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

B. A. JONES, Amherst, Mass. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. XI. 



AMHERST, MASS., MAY 15, 1901, 



NO. 12 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will be sent 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT, 1902, Editor-in-Chief. 

LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, 1902, Business Manager. 

WILLIAM ETHERINGTON ALLEN, 1903, Assistant Business Manager. 
VICTOR ADOLPH GATES, 1902, Athletics. CHARLES MILTON KINNEY, 1902, Exchanges. 

RICHARD HENDRIC ROBERTSON, 1903, Department Notes. CLAUDE ISAAC LEWIS, 1902. 

NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN, 1903, College Notes. MYRON HOWARD WEST, 1903, Alumni Notes. 

FAYETTE DICKINSON COUDEN, 1904. ARTHUR LEE PECK, 1904. 

Terms: $1.00 per gear in advance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside o{ United States and Canada, 2Sc. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot- Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 
Reading-Room Association, 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

D. N. WEST, Pres. Athletic Association, 

V. A. Gates, Manager. Base- Ball Association, 

J. H. Chickering, Sec. Nineteen Hundred and Three Index, 

V. A. Gates, Sec. Fraternity Conference, 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec 
C. L. Rice, Manager. 
G. L. Barrus, Manager. 
C. E. Gordon, Sec. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



Ccll'tbri^kls. 



Owing to the inability of the state adjutant-general 
to loan to the college the camp equipage of the state 
militia, it is evident that our anticipated week of camp 
life will again have to be postponed. This we regard 
as unfortunate, since the value of the experience and 
training to be obtained from such a trip is unques- 
tioned. However, it is well to remember that the 
lack of success of the attempt in no way detracts 
from the credit due the military commandant for his 
efforts. On the contrary, by his zeal in this and other 
matters, he has showed that he has thoroughly at 
heart the best interests of the student body. 



We desire at this time to congratulate the college 
band on the great improvement manifest in its work. 
It is no easy matter to organize from untrained mate- 
rial a really good band, and we are surprised to find 
that it has been done so soon. The appearance and 
showing made by the band during the last few drills are 
thoroughly creditable, and an increased interest in the 



entire military organization is already apparent. The 
action of the band in devoting one evening each week 
to a concert, as well as appearing at our baseball 
games is most assuredly a move in the right direction. 
We only hope that it will continue and become a 
recognized college custom. If kept up, it might solve 
very satisfactorily the vexatious problem of bringing 
the student body together. That one outcome will be 
college singing follows logically. In fact the possibil- 
ities of such a movement are almost without limit. 



The career of the baseball team has been closely 
followed during the past few weeks, and we think there 
is general satisfaction with its progress. In defeating 
Middlebury our team succeeded in doing what older 
and larger colleges have failed to do, and in the Storrs 
game, the team proved its ability to run up a score. 
There are still however one or two noticeable faults. 
Our team is not so strong at the bat as could be de- 
sired, and it is still liable to spoil its chances for vic- 
tory by costly errors in a single inning. The support 
of the students while somewhat improved is still unsat- 



i54 



AGGIE LIFE. 



isfactory. The cheering at times is extremely poor. 
During the exciting finish of the Middlebury game, it 
was much better than usual. How large a part is 
played in rousing the team from their lethargy in 
that splendid rally in the ninth we cannot say. It is 
certain however that poor cheering disheartens rather 
than encourages. Let us have good cheering or none 
whatever. 



A WORD respecting contributions to the Life is per- 
haps needed at this time. The following statement 
appears in each number : " Students and alumni are 
requested to contribute." This does not refer alone 
to a more or less vigorous contest during the winter 
term only for the position on the editorial board. It 
implies a responsibility on the part of the students for 
the welfare of this paper at all times. The Aggie 
Life stands before the world not alone as the work of 
a particular board of editors but as the official repre- 
sentative of the students of this college. By it the 
literary standing of the college is mainly determined- 
just as in athletics the college is rated according to 
the success of its various teams. There can be no 
doubt that the maintaining of a strong second eleven 
for the past two years has done more to improve the 
rank of our football team than any other one factor ; 
it is not too much to hope that a more extended sup- 
port of the Life would yield correspondingly good 
results. There is however one rule which we shall 
have to insist on. In every case, the name of the 
writer must be known. If desired, it will in any case 
be withheld from publication. In this Issue, we made 
an exception partly because there was no definite rule 
on the subject. The tendency in journalism seems to 
be however to disregard the anonymous letter ; and 
this we shall be compelled to do in the future. 



There is one college organization which once 
played a prominent part in our life which we think 
might well be revived. This is the tennis association. 
We have only to glance out on the courts on any 
pleasant day to realize that there is no lack of interest 
in tennis this spring. We cannot understand why the 
old association was allowed to fall through. So far 
as we could learn, the tournaments of the past were 
well participated in and the contest for the champion- 
ship quite keen. There is apparently no reason why 



a tournament this spring could not be equally suc- 
cessful. Certainly if one could be arranged to take 
place during Commencement week it would add much 
to the interest. In the past there has been no athletic 
event during our Commencement season and the re- 
sult has been that the exercises have been rather 
more monotonous than might be desired. There 
seems little chance of arranging any other sort of con- 
test, and if we are to enliven our Commencement it 
apparently must be by means of tennis. The move- 
ment, too, might very easily go further. Intercolle- 
giate tennis was never more popular than now and we 
do not believe that it would be difficult to arrange a 
contest with some college of about equal rank. From 
this it would be comparatively easy to gain admission 
into the New England Intercollegiate Tennis associa- 
tion, the advantages of which are so apparent that no 
detailed mention is necessary. However, if anything 
of the kind is to be done this term, the movement 
must be started at once. The initial step is appar- 
ently as we have indicated the reorganization of the 
tennis association. 



It will be remembered that in our last issue we 
referred to the question of changing the name of the 
college paper, and called for a general expression of 
opinion. The answer while perhaps all that we ex- 
pected falls far short of what we could have desired. 
We publish in another column three communications 
received from the alumni, which represents to date 
the sum total of the response. We ask the students 
to give these letters careful consideration. They are 
representative, we think, of the great body of the 
alumni. They are from men who have lived their 
college life in these, our college grounds, and they are 
in a position to speak with authority of the traditions 
and sentiments of our Alma Mater. We believe also 
that in every case they are from men once serving 
upon this editorial board and so familiar with its prob- 
lems. It behooves us to give close attention there- 
fore to their views. The unanimity of their opinion is 
certainly suggestive. In one respect however we can- 
not agree with them. They declare that the entire 
body of the alumni would bitterly oppose any change 
in name. The scanty replies we have received would 
indicate rather that the alum.ni are rather indifferent 
than otherwise. However, it may be that many are 



AGGIE LIFE. 



IS5 



holding back the.r opinions and that we shall hear 
from them presently. The matter is still open for dis- 
cussion and will so remain till May 27. Before that 
time we hope to hear from many. On the extent and 
character of the replies received will rest in large 
measure we believe the final decision of the student 
body. Therefore, " speak or forever hold your peace," 



A SCHEME THAT FAILED. 

" Hello, Sam ! " shouted a voice as its owner poked 
his head out of a second story window, " Where are 
you going? I was just getting ready to come down to 
see you." 

" O, hello. Conk! What are you doing up in there 
this time of night ? Why, I thought you were up on 
the corner. What's the matter ? " 

" For heaven's sake shut that infernal trap of yours 
and come up here. I want to tell you something." 

So in bolted Sam, a fellow not less than six feet 
three inches. A few of his giant strides brought him 
to George Conklin's room. 

" What in the de ." 

" Keep quiet," retorted George, as Sam was about 
to let out a lot of his lingo while viewing the things 
strewn around the room. 

'' Sit down there and don't mumble a word I am 
going to tell you. Well, I was up to Mabel's to-night 
and I excused myself as not feeling well in order to 
get away early." 

" It was just this way. Mabel and I were sitting 
in the parlor and the door that opens into the little 
hallway was ajar so that I could easily hear any noise 
that might be made in the room just across. We 
hadn't sat there long before we heard voices in this 
room which sounded very much like John's and his 
old man's. They were talking in an undertone as if 
they didn't want any one to hear ; but I heard them 
Sam," and here George's eyes sparkled with satisfac- 
tion as he brought his hand down so heavily upon 
Sam's shoulder that the blow made him wince. 
" They were talking about some fellows down on the 
' Gliff ' who had a fine little plan in view. As near as 
I could make out they had got wind of where old 
Capt. Kidd had buried his money on Tom Mott's 
Point and were going down there next Tuesday night," 

" Now I have a scheme, Sam. You know next 



week I have a vacation and you and I can take your 
boat and head these fellows off. What do you say ? 
Shall we do it ? Gome now, say yes." 

At this point George was greatly excited and moved 
around quite nervously. Sam, who, although ready 
and fool-hardy enough to enter into almost any plan, 
was rather sceptical concerning these hear-say things, 
but once he made up his mind to do a thing he would 
do it, come what might. He therefore shook his 
head at first but, seeming to catch the inspiration of 
the plan, he shouted, he would. 

" But see here, Conk, you know my boat needs 
some repairs before I can get out with it, and besides 
that I partly promised Henry I would go with him 
Tuesday afternoon. Then I'll try to get arouud that. 
It'll be a big job to get the boat ready by Tuesday 
evening aside from trying to get off Monday night. 
That was a bad knock she got on that rock." 

Then followed a long discussion on the work to be 
done and how to do it without everybody around quiz- 
zing them as to where they were going. Eleven 
o'clock came and Sam departed but still having a 
slight suspicion that somehow or other George might 
be mistaken about money being buried on this point. 

All day, Monday and Tuesday, they applied them- 
selves diligently to the work of getting the boat ready 
for the water. The damage was greater than they 
had anticipated and when Tuesday night came they 
were thoroughly tired. In the meantime several in- 
quisitive people had poked their noses into the work 
and all sorts of stories were resorted to by the two 
fellows to cast off suspicion. Supper-time saw the 
boat in the water and Sam and George wended their 
way home with great satisfaction over their day's 
work. Eight o'clock came and the fellows were on 
their way to the point. 

" Say George, what time did you say they would 
leave the ' Cliff ? " 

•' Not till quite late as they can get off from there 
any time. It doesn't matter about the tide down 
there." 

" If this wind don't pick up a bit it will be morning 
before we get there ; and what there is, is dead 
against us. It will soon be nine now and at this rate 
eleven will see us opposite the ' Cliff.' They will get 
there before we do." 



156 



AGGIE LIFE 



" Supposing they do, we can hold our own." 

Thus the conversation was kept up between the 
two fellows. All sorts of plans were made as to what 
they would do if they came across the other party on 
the beach. One hour passed and then another, and 
just as Sam predicted they were opposite the " Cliff." 
However, the wind was beginning to strengthen a little 
and one hour more would see them at the point; 

George who had stretched himself out upon the 
deck had been almost lulled to sleep by the faint, 
trickling sound of the little waves as they patted 
against the side of the boat ; but he was suddenly 
awakened by the flapping of the sail as Sam came 
about for another tack. He gazed listlessly toward 
the ' Cliff ' where he had his attention attracted by a 
light moving back and forth. 

"Say Sam, do you see that light over there ? " 
I'll bet it is those fellows getting ready to start. It 
sort a looks as though we had to do some tall hust- 
ling if we want to get there and hunt for the place 
before they come." 

" That's right to. Give me about a half hour more 
with this breeze which we are beginning to get and I 
shallbe there. You've got those shovels all ready, 
hey, Conk? It won't be long before we shall anchor. 
You know it won't do to anchor too near shore on ac- 
count of the rocks." 

A little while longer and they are ready to anchor. 

" Look out for yourself there, I am going to bring 
her about. Over with the anchor ; be quick! " 

A strong throw, a splash, and the anchor is on the 
bottom. 

" I will untie the row-boat while you get the shovels," 
said Sam to George quietly. 

" Say Sam, that looks like a sail going north over 
there." 

" It certainly does " answered Sam as he pulled for 
shore. " Keep a sharp look out ahead and I'll pull 
like the devil." 

In a few minutes they are ashore. 

" Go ahead George you know where the place is.'' 

" As near as I could make out they said it was 
near a large boulder where everybody comes for 
camping and clam-bakes. There, that rock ahead 
looks like it ; yes, it is." 

" Come, there Conk, get a move on you; those 
fellows are making their last tack and five minutes 



will see them in here. They are heading right this 
way by the looks of things. Lucky for us we left our 
boat on the other side of the point or they might give 
us some trouble." 

" This looks like the spot Sam. Here, take this 
shovel and dig in there while I try it here," said 
George nervously and excitedly. 

" Jingo, I can hear voices now," answered Sam as 
he began to shovel the sand with aquick.steady move- 
ment, while George was fumbling on the other side of 
the rock. 

" Look, quick, they've anchored already. Haven't 
you struck anything yet ? It begins to look as if it 
was all up with us." 

" Yes and here they come in the row-boat. We 
had better hold up a minute or two or our noise may 
attract them. I thing they will land a little further 
up." 

And sure enough they landed three or four hundred 
feet from the two treasure-seekers. For some rea- 
son part of the fellows returned to the sail-boat and 
the two thinking it best to take advantage of this fact 
began to dig with a will but as noiselessly as possible. 

Suddenly Sam's shovel struck something hard 
which caused it to ring loud enough to be heard out 
to the boat. This attracted the attention of those on 
shore and they came creeping up to see what was 
going on. 

" Golly, Conk, I've struck it. Come here and help 
get it out." 

With the united efforts of the two they pulled out an 
old iron pot weighing as much as one could lift. Just 
then they were started by a hello from one of those 
who remained on shore and had crept upon them una- 
wares. At the same moment the exclamation was 
answered from the sail-boat that they were coming as 
they thought the shout was for them. 

" What do you want," answered Sam, angry as a 
hornet because they were discovered. 

" Nothing," came the response. " We heard a 
noise and came over to see what was going on." 

By this time the other fellows had landed near by 
guided by the talking. Soon Sam and George were 
surrounded by five fellows eager to learn what was up. 

" I don't see what our doing here has got to do 
with you," growled George who was doing his best to 
hide the pot from sight. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



157 



" Don't get fresh there or we will give you a duck- 
ing," said one. 

" Ho ! ho ! what's that ? " shouted another as he 
caught a glimpse of the pot. 

" Leave that alone," said Sam who made a grab 
for the treasure and tried to run. He was soon 
stopped when he began to show fight. But George 
whispered that it was all up with them and he had 
better quiet down. 

'■V/hat! is that you, Sam ? " shouted a familiar 
voice. "What in the name of Hanna are you doing 
down here? " 

"Well, if that isn't Bert 1 Doing about the same 
thing as you I reckon." 

" You tried to sneak off with your booty, didn't 
you ? ha ! ha ! Come now, you will have to share 
up." 

" Guess we will by the looks of things. Say, Conk, 
open it up and let's see what's in it. Here, some one 
hold that lantern so a fellow can see." 

Slowly and carefully George began to pull off the 
bits of seaweed fastened in the top of the pot while 
the other fellows stood around with expectant faces. 
The seaweed off but no lid ; then sand, sand, sand to 
the very bottom itself. With a dismayed, disap- 
pointed expression George arose and looked around 
him. They looked at one another for a moment in 
silence and then two or three unable to restrain any 
longer burst into a hearty laugh. 

" That's the biggest joke yet " said one. 

" Didn't ! tell you so," came in another. 

" That looks like the very pot that Henry Brooks 
took with him a few years ago when he came over 
here to camp out," said Bert after having examined 
the vessel. " I can tell because of this peculiar 
shaped hole in the rim. The whole thing is very 
plain. Hen camped out here and this pot having 
been left became filled with sand by the waves and 
tide." D. N. W. 



Wm. H. Murphy, Yale, '93. has been engaged as 
head coach for the Yale baseball team this spring. 
While at college he played four years on the Yale 
nine and has since played two years on the New York 
team of the National League. In 1898 he coached 
U. of P. nine. He will begin active coaching about 
May I. 



COMMUNICATIONS. 

132 Central Ave., Albany, N. Y. 
April 27, 1901. 
Mr. H. L. Knight. Editor-in-chief, Aggie Life, 
Amherst, Mass. 

Dear Mr. Knight:—! am much interested in 
having the name Aggie Life retained for the college 
paper of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. I 
well remember when it was bestowed and you may 
rest assured that it was given only after considerable 
deliberation. It was not the favorite of anyone of the 
first board of editors, to whom the naming of the 
paper fell, but it was a combination of two proposed 
names after the elimination of a number of less de- 
sirable ones. The name adopted was the unanimous 
choice, after deliberation, of the first board of editors 
and though there were some misgivings on my part at 
first as to its being the best name, there are none 
now and I have watched the paper closely throughout 
its existence. 

The name is short, easily remembered, includes 
the designation bestowed upon the college by many of 
her most loyal children and in the last word we have 
defined just what the paper is or should be — a reflec- 
tion of the life and activities of the student body. It 
is true that a paper may have other functions but for 
a college paper, it seems to me, there could be no 
better name. 

A word regarding the term '• Aggie." My diploma, 
granted in 1891, purports to have been issued by the 
" Massachusetts Agricultural College " and the cata- 
logue dated January 1901 is apparently issued by the 
same institution and it bears the same name as have 
earlier ones. It has always been my impression that 
the state college located at Amherst, Mass., was an 
agricultural college and that the term " Aggie," was 
simply a contraction of the most characteristic word 
in her name and when I hear a man say " Aggie," I 
feel that he loves the college which gave me such a 
life along the way of learning. In my opinion, the 
name " Aggie " is too deeply fixed in the minds of 
the older men to be ever forgotten and even though 
the institution may hold a broader conception of what 
may properly be taught in an agricultural college than 
it did in my day, a change of the popular name is ill- 
advised and it should not attempt to modify the official 
designation of the institution — a name bestowed by 



158 



AGGIE LIFE. 



the General Court of Massachusetts and one which 
should not be set aside lightly by either students, 
alumni or faculty. 

Yours truly, 

E. P. Felt, M. A. C. '91. 



East Point, Georgia, 

April 26, 1901. 

Mr. H. L. Knight, Editor-in-chief, Aggie Life. 

Dear Sir : — I am emphatically in favor of retaining 
the present name of the college paper, Aggie Life. 
The name " Aggie " should in no way cause shame 
to a son of the institution. The name is a popular 
and time-honored one, particularly endeared to alumni 
I fear a substitution would prove injurious to the col- 
lege and believe an immense majority of the alumni 
would cry out against it. 

Very truly yours, 
Elias D. White, M. A. C.. '94. 



48 Ft. Green Place, 
Brooklyn, N. Y., April 25, 1901. 
Editor-in-chief, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. 

Dear Sir : — Your issue of April 24 asks for a gen- 
eral expression of opinion among the alumni regarding 
the name of the college paper. The articie also inti- 
mates that the majority both in the student body and 
in the faculty would favor changing the name in the 
hope of eliminating the word " Aggie " from such an 
intimate connection with the institution as it now 
occupies. 

In my opinion the Aggie Life can stand on its 
merits name and all. Since the paper first began to 
be published regularly it has gone through some dark 
days, like a good many other enterprises, but it has 
succeeded in overcoming all the threatening obstacles 
and to-day compares very favorably with similar pub- 
lications of older and larger institutions. 

But just a word about the expression " Aggie." It 
must be about as old as the college itself. The alumni 
remember and speak of the college as old " Aggie " 
but the word " Aggie " doesn't call to their minds 
fields of grain or onions or cabbages. To the alumni 
the word "Aggie" is an endearing term for their 
Alma Mater and to them the sentiment that has made 
the expression so natural is too strong to allow its 
irreverent dismissal. 

Very truly yours, 

Geo. H. Wright, '98. M. A. C. 



Editor-in-chief, Aggie Life. 

Dear Sir : — Permit me, through the columns of 
your paper, to set before the students of this institu- 
tion, the fact that our Campus is becoming a gen- 
eral play-ground for numerous boys from town. Not 
only on our Campus do we see them, but all over 
the beautiful lawns surrounding our college. 

During the spring days of this term the fact has 
been prominently brought before me as it has to many 
others and I hope that something may be done to rid 
our beautiful grounds of what is soon to become a 
nuisance, 

A Student. 



CHEMICAL CLUB. 



The final meeting of the Chemical Club for the 
year 1901 was held Monday evening. May 6 in the 
Chemiical lecture room. A large number were pres- 
ent. The speaker of the evening was Dr. C. A. 
Goessmann who spoke very interestingly on " Then 
and Now in Germany." Dr. Goessmann compared 
the Germany which he left fifty years ago with that 
which he found on hisrecent visit, treating especially of 
the remarkable progress which has been made along 
agricultural and experimental lines. At the close of 
the lecture refreshments were served. 



RECEPTION. 

The second reception given by the ladies of the 
faculty was held in the chapel Friday evening, April 
26, and was a brilliant success. A large number 
of the students availed themselves of the oppor- 
tunity to meet young ladies from Smith college, 
Amherst and adjoining towns. Thanks to the deco- 
rating committee the chapel presented a very pleasing 
appearance. After a social hour a musical program 
consisting of the following numbers was well rendered: 

Solo, Mr. Raymoth 

Duet, Mrs. Paige and Mrs. Burnett 

Organ solo, Miss Maynard 

Solo, Mr. Allen 

Solo, Mrs. Burnett 

Double Quartette, College 

After the reception special cars waited at the walk. 
Many thanks are due to the ladies of the faculty and 
the various committees. 



AGGIE LIFE, 



159 



oiie< 



— S. B. Haskell, 1904 has left college. 
— G. E. O'Hearn, 1903 is back at college. 

— C. A. Tinker, 1903 is again attending recitations 
with his class. 

— The Seniors planted their class tree on the night 
of May 4 — Arbor day. 

— R. A. Quigley, 1904 has gone home for the 
remainder of the term. 

— Rev. J. W. Day of Amherst spoke in the chapel 
Tuesday evening the 28th. 

— The reception given by the ladies of the Faculty 
on the 26th was a great success. 

— Prof. Maynard lectured in Hadley the 23rd, his 
subject being " Roads and Roadside Improvements." 

— Mr, Gilbert of Yale Univ. recently addressed the 
Y. M. C. A. on the " Volunteer movement of Our 
Student Body." 

— The following men have charge of the Senior 
Prom. : Whitman, chairman ; Brooks, Todd, Wilson, 
Leslie, Gamwell. 

— Prof. Herman Babson has a very interesting 
article in the Outlook for May, entitled " Justin S. 
Morrill and Popular Education. " 

— Prof. Emerson of Amherst College recently gave 
the Sophomores a field lecture on the formation of 
soil as found on the college farm. 

— The preliminary speaking before the Faculty of 
the Sophomore and Freshmen tens will take place in 
the chapel, May 24 at 2 p. m. All are invited. 

— The band has received an appropriation of $50, 
with which they will purchase new music pouches and 
band caps. Gilbert, 1904 has entered the band. 

— The Flint Six who will represent the Junior class 
on the commencement stage are; A. L. Dacy, J. C. 
Hall, H. L. Knight, C. \. Lewis, R. W. Morse, D. 
N. West. 

— The classes of 1902 and 1903 held a joint meeting 
and elected the following men to serve on the Senate 
for the coming year 1902: L. C. Claflin, V. A. Gates, 
H. L. Knight, R. V/. Morse. 1903: H. J. Franklin, 
C. P. Halligan, R. H. Robertson, E. B. Snell. 



— The sixty-second annual meeting of the Spring- 
field Zoolozical club was held in the Science Lecture 
Hall of the Springfield High School on Friday after- 
noon May 3. Prof. H. T. Fernald of our college 
lectured on " How Animals See. " 

— The college band gave a concert on the campus 
last Wednesday evening which was enjoyed by all. 
This is the first of a series which the band will give, one 
each week for the remainder of the term. They played 
selections from Wagner, Durand, Sutton, Hendon, 
Ripley. 

— The college was somewhat surprised one morning 
a few days ago to find the entire equipage of the 
Military Recitation room on the island in the pond. 
Everything was in good order and if any means of 
transportation were visible, one would suppose that the 
English department intended holding their recitation 
in this delightful spot. 

— The Senior commencement speakers are : Clar- 
ence E. Gordon, Nathan J. Hunting, Edward S. Gam- 
well, James H. Chickering, Ernest L. Macomber and 
Alexander C. Wilson. The class appointments : Ivy 
poet, C. E. Gordon ; Class orator, J. C, Barry; Class 
poet, C. L. Rice ; Campus orator, P.C. Brooks ; Pipe 
orator, N. D. Whitman ; Hatchet orator, J. H. Todd. 

— The freshman ten who will speak before the 
Faculty, May 24th, at 2 p. m. are : P. H. Bowler. F. 
D. Couden, John Cummings, J. W. Gregg, C. H. 
Griffin, C. W. Kirby, C. W. Lewis, H. Martin, S. R. 
Parker, R. R. Raymoth. The Sophomore eight are : 
H. J. Franklin, Albert Parsons, W. W. Peebles, E. 
W. Poole, E. G. Proulx, W. E. Tottingham, F. W. 
Webster, M. H. West. 

— The Senior '* Polycons " defeated the " Botanists" 
in a game of base ball last week. Score 1 1-7. The 
line up was : 



Polycons, 




Botanists 


Barry, 
Henry, 
Rice, 


P-. 

c, 
1st b., 


Pierson 

Chickering 

Gamwell 


Todd, 


2nd, 


Macomber 


Cooke, 


3rd, 


Jones 


Whitman, 


shot. 


Dickerman 


Hunting 


r. field, 


Dawson- Brooks 


Casey. 
Root-Bridgforth, 


c. f., 
1. f.. 


Leslie 
Smith 



i6o 



AGGIE LIFE. 



/Athletic fJo-t^s- 



" Aggie" 1 1 ; Connecticut A. C. 6. 

The first home game of the season was played with 
the Connecticut Agricultural College on the Campus 
Saturday May 4th. The game was loosely played 
both teams making a number of errors. 

The Connecticut team started in well making three 
runs in the first two innings and it looked for a while 
as if " Aggie " wouldn't be in it. In the third inning the 
Aggie's took a brace scoring three runs and tieing the 
score. In the eight inning the Connecticut team by 
bunching their hits made two more runs while " Aggie " 
scored almost at will winning the game by a score of 
1 1 to 5. 

The features of the game were the home run by 
O'Hearn in the third inningwith two men on bases thus 
tieing the score and the base running of Bowler 
who stole second and third and finally home base. 
Mouarty and Blakeslee played best game for Connec- 
ticut while Cummings and Cook excelled for Aggie. 



O'Hearn, 2., 
Paul, s., 
Bowler, r.p., 
Gregg, 3., 
Bodfish, r.p., 
Graves, m., 
Harris, 1., 
Cummings, 
Cook, c, 

Total 



1., 



A.B. 
5 

4 
4 
4 
4 
3 
4 
3 



Mouarty 3., 
Blakeslee, 2., 
Harvey, c, 
Clark, 1., 
Downing, 3., 
Mcdean, p. 3. 
Pratt, r., 
Lawson, m., 
Karr, 1., 



39 


9 


27 


11 


7 


A.B. 


B. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


5 




3 


2 





5 




1 


5 


1 


5 




7 


1 


1 


5 




11 








5 




1 





2 


3 








3 





3 














4 


1 


1 





2 


4 


2 












Total 39 8 24 11 6 

M.A. C. 3 2 1 4 1 —11 

C. A. C. 120000020—2 

Runs— O'Hearn 2, Paul,Bowler, Graves 2, Cummings 3, Cook 2, Harvey, 
Pratt, Lawson, Carr 2. Stolen Ijases— Paul, Bowler 3, Gregg, Graves, 
Cummings 2, Cook, Harvey, Clark, Karr. Two base hit — Graves. Home rum — 
O'Hearn — Base on bal's off Bodfish 5, off McSears 3,off Mouarty 2. Struck 
out— by Bodfish 8, by Bowler 2 by McSears 3 by Mouarty 4. Double play 
— Clark unassisted. Umpire — George Merritt. 

" Aggie " 4 ; Middlebury 3. 

On Thursday, May 9, " Aggie " defeated Middlebury 
College on the campus by a score of 4 to 3. Middle- 
bury was unable to score until the seventh inning. 
The game was a pitcher's battle from the start with 
Bodfish having a little the best of it striking out ten 



men and allowing five hits while Drake struck out 
eight men and allowed six hits. 

Aggie opened the game well by scoring one run in 
the first inning and one in the fourth and not allowing 
Middlebury to score until the seventh inning when they 
made one run. In the eighth inning Middlebury made 
two more runs making the score three to two. Wilds 
gets first on a hit and and is advanced to second by 
Barley who is thrown out at first. Stearns hits to 
Bodfish who throws wild to first allowing Wilds to score 
and Stearns to reach third. On a hit by McCuen 
Stearns reached home making the score three to two. 
After the fourth inning Aggie did not score again until 
the ninth inning when by a brace of hits and errors 
they made two runs. Cummings hits safe. Harris 
knocks a fly to the first baseman who muffs it allowing 
Cummings to reach second and Harris first. On a hit 
by Bodfish Cummings scores and Harris reaches third. 
Paul knocks a fly to Simonds who fields it but is 
unable to prevent Harris from scoring thus mak- 
ing the score four to three in Aggie's favor. Only one 
out when the winning run was made. Drake and 
McCuen played best game for Middlebury while Bod- 
fish, Ahearn and Cook excelled for Aggie. 



Paul, s., 
O'Hearn, 2., 3., 
Cook, c. , 
Graves, m.. 
Bowler, r.f., 
Ahearn, 2., 
Cummings, 1., 
Harris, 1., 
Bodfish, p., 
Gregg, 3., 

Total 



2 
2 
11 
1 

3 
8 


1 



33 


6 


27 


11 


3 


Middlebury. 










A.B. 


B. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


3 


1 


3 





1 


4 





3 





1 


4 


1 


9 


3 





4 


1 





4 





4 


1 











3 











1 


2 














4 








2 


2 


4 


1 


8 


1 


1 


2 





2 





I 



Barly, 

Stearns, 

McCuen, 

Drake, 

Lester, 

Stafford. 

Wethwell, 

Hughes. 

Wilds, 

Simonds, 

Total ' 34 5 25 10 7 

M. AC. 10010000 2—4 

Middlebury 12 0—3 

Runs— O'Hearn, Graves, Cummings, Macomber, Stearns, McCuen, Wilds. 
Sacrifice hits — Stearns, Bowler. Stolen bases — Graves 2, O'Hearn Paul, 
Lester, McCuen. Three base hit — Drake. First base on balls — off Bodfish 
2, off Drake 3. Struck out— by Bodfish 10, by Drake 8. Batter hit.— 
Graves. Pass balls — McCuen 2. Time — 2h. Umpire — George Merritt. 



Swarthmore college ^^Fhoenix" published with their 
last Issue a supplement engraving of the editors and 
and staff of eleven, two of which are young ladies. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



i6i 



>nB . 



72.— John C. Cutter, 72-7 Gates St., Worcester, 
Mass. 

72.— Chas. O. Flagg, Kingston, R. I. 

'72. — E. D. Shaw, Holyoke, Mass. 

74._G. H. Babbitt, 340 Grove St., Chickopee, 
Falls, Mass. 

75. — Walter N. Knapp, Newtonville, Mass. 

79. — Harry Bond, 424 Norwood Ave., Buffalo, 
N. Y. 

76. — G. A. Parker, box 553, Hartford, Conn. 

76. — Cyrus Taft, Whitinsville, Mass. 

78. — ^C. E, Lyman, Middlefield, Conn. 

78. — Guy Morey, Lowell, Mass. 

79. — Geo. C. Smith, Sunderland, Mass. 

'82.— Geo. T. Alpin, East Putney, Vt. 

'82. — F. E. Chipman, 15 1-2 Beacon St., Boston. 

'82.— S. J. Holmes, 188 Park St., Montclair, N. J. 

'82. — S. C. Damon, Lancaster, Mass. 

'82. — Robert A. Eschran, Cotton Manufacturer at 
Marysville, Ky, 

'82. — Walter H. Thurston, died of pneumonia, 
Aug. 25, 1900, at Cape Nome. 

'83.— H. J.Wheeler, Kingston. R. 1. 

'83. — D. O. Nourse, Blacksburg, Va. 

'85. — Chas. S. Cutter, 151 Summer St., Arlington, 
Mass. 

'87. — H. L. Brown, Peabody, Mass. 

'87. — A. W, Paine, Medford, Mass. 

'88.— R. B. Moore, 324 1-2 Franklin St., Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

'88,— J. E. Holt, Andover, Mass. 

'89. — A. D, Copeland, Copeland St., Campello, 
Mass. 

'89. — James R. Blair, 158 Massachusetts Ave., 
Cambridge, Mass. 

'90.— H. L. Russell, Pawtucket, R. L 

'90. — F. W. Mossman, Westminster, Mass. 

'91. — w. C. Paige, Y. M. C. A. Secretary at Hen- 
derson, Ky., has accepted a call to the Louisville 
association, and will enter upon his duties on July 1st. 



'91. — H. T. Shores, Northampton, Mass. 
'91.— W. H. Pond, N. Attleboro, Mass. 
'91. — M. A. Carpenter, Park Road, Mt. Auburn, 
Mass. 

'91. — H. M. Howard, West Newton, Mass. 

'92 — C. S. Graham, Westboro, Mass. 

'92. — Elliot Rogers. Kennebunk, Me. 

'93.— H. D. Clark, Fitchburg, Mass. 

'93.— A. Edward Melendy, 117 West Boylston St., 
Worcester, Mass. 

'94. — \. C. Green, box 703, Leominster, Mass. 

'94. — George H. Mervin, route 33, Southford Ct. 

'94. — E. D. White, messenger on the Central 
Georgia R. R., has lately been the victim of a bold 
hold-up. He was bound and gagged by the robbers, 
who after securing about $350, left the train at Gor- 
don. Mr. White was found soon afterwards by the 
conductor and was released. He was uninjured. 

'94.— J. E. Gifford, Sutton, Mass. 

'94. — Arthur H. Cutter, Shawmut Ave., Boston. 

'94.— T. S. Bacon, 6 Maple St., Springfield. Mass. 

'94.— T. Fayette Keith, 304 Main St., Fitchburg, 
Mass. 

'94. — Arthur A. Cutter, Surgeon Interne, Paleism, 
(Paleism, N. Y.,) General Hospital. 

'95. — We are pleased to announce the marriage of 
Mr. Waldo L. Bemis and Miss Etta A. Josselyn. 
They will reside at Grove St., Spencer, Conn. 

'96. — Salome Sastre is reported to be doing a 
prosperous business at his plantation at Santa Rosa- 
lie, Mexico. 

'96. — H. T. Edwards lately sailed for the Philip- 
pines, where he expects to enter the hemp business, 
Communications may be sent in care of Capt. Oliver 
Edwards, A. D. C, Custom House, Manila, 

'98. — A. D. Adjimian has opened a chemical labor- 
tory in Harpoot, Turkey. 

'00. — F. G. Stanley was recently married to Miss 
Bertha 1. Roberts, at the home of the bride's mother, 
in Springfield. 



An Association building fund of more than $7,000 
was raised in less than a week recently at the Univer- 
sity of Oregon. 



l62 



AGGIE LIFE. 



LIBRARY. 

''Morphology of Spermatophytes y by John M. 
Coulter, Ph. D., head of the department of Botany in 
the University of Chicago, and Charles J. Chamber- 
lain, Ph. D., instructor in Botany in the University of 
Chicago. This book is intended to prepare the stu- 
dent for research in the morphology of seed-plants. 
It brings together and organizes the very voluminous 
and scattered literature of the subject, points out and 
discusses the problems, seeks to unify a very confus- 
ing terminology, and at the same time contributes no 
small amount of original observation and illustration. 
Following the presentation of the separate great 
groups, their comparative morphology, history, and 
phylogeny are discussed. At the end of each chapter, 
which discusses a great group, a list of the works cited 
is given. The book contains a large number of illus- 
trations and is neatly printed on a good grade of 
paper. 

" Animal Life," a first book on Zoology, by David 
Starr Jordan, Ph. D., LL. D., president of Leland 
Stanford Junior University, and Vernon L. Kellogg, 
M. S., professor in Leland Stanford Junior University. 
An elementary account of animal ecology, — the rela- 
tions of animals to their surroundings and of the re- 
sponsive adopting or fitting of the life of animals to 
these surroundings. The book treats of animals from 
the point of view of the observer and student of ani- 
mal life, who wishes to know why animals are in 
structure and habits as they are. It is extensively 
illustrated and well printed with good clear-cut type. 

" Garden-Making," suggestions for the utilization of 
home grounds, by L. H. Bailey, aided by L. R. Taft, 
professor of Horticulture in the Agricultural College 
of Michigan; F. A. Waugh, professor of Horticulture 
in the University of Vermont ; and Ernest Walker, 
assistant in Horticulture and Entomology in Clemson 
College, South Carolina. L. R. Taft is a graduate 
of the M. A. C. of the class of '82, and acted as 
assistant to Professor Maynard during the year 1883. 
The book gives general advice on the preparation of 
the land, sowing and planting, forcing of plants, in- 
sects and diseases, and enriching the land. A section 
is given to the picture in the landscape, and contains 



a sketch of what a picture is and how it may be ob- 
tained, contrasts massed and scattered plantings, dis- 
cusses flower-beds, borders, types of bushes for lawn 
effects. Other sections discuss the fruit plantation, 
and the vegetable garden. This is the fourth edition 
of the book, and it has been thoroughly revised. It is 
a valuable volume for any one interested in garden- 
making, and contains many illustrations. 

•' The Principles of Mechanics ^ an elementary expo- 
sition for students of Physics, by Frederick Slate, 
professor of Physics in the University of California. 
This is a text book for a junior grade class, who have 
brought to their task a v/orking knowledge of calculus, 
and a good groundwork of experimental physics. The 
complete work is divided into two volumes, only num- 
ber one of which is in the library. 

"Botany," an elementary text book for beginners, 
by L. H. Bailey. This volume is the best of its kind 
ever published. It is a revised edition and far superior 
to the old publication. It takes up structure and class- 
ification, and is well illustrated. 

HORTICULTURE. 

At this season of the year, \vhen nature is covering 
everything within its reach with a fresh robe of green, 
relieving the dreary landscape of the winter months, 
the beauties presented to our view are more fully ap- 
preciated. The plant-house grounds are putting on 
their best appearance, and is now the most attractive 
spot to be seen in this vicinity. It has been stated by 
a good authority that our grounds contain the best 
collection of trees and shrubs in the state. The mag- 
nolia blossoms have appeared in unusually large num- 
bers and are perhaps the most conspicious. Numer- 
ous other shrubs and flowers are blossoming out every 
day, increasing the brilliancy of the picture. 

Mr. Burbank, of California, has given the College a 
number of Japanese plum trees, and they are now 
being set out in the orchards. There has also been 
a large number of American plum trees added to the 
Clark orchard. 

The blossoms on the plum and peach trees give 
evidence of an unusually large crop. The trees 
make a pretty sight at this time of the year, the 
branches and trunks being almost completely hidden 
from view by the flowers. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



163 



THE CLOUD SEAS OF HOLYOKE. 

[From my note book.] 

" Five A. M., August third. Opened South window. 
Wonderful ! A Second Deluge ! The Peaks of Tom 
and Holyoke still visible. The sea stretches far away 
to the distant hills. It rises. Beyond Holyoke the 
rolling waves lash themselves into a perfect fury, and 
toss the spray high in the air. Only the tips of the 
hills to be seen. This side the range a torrent rushes 
roaring and raging over the half hidden rocks, dashing 
out into the great sea between Tom and Holyoke. It 
changes. The water deepens, and the huge waves 
beaten by the tempest chase each other in their 
Titanic playfulness. Now they rush with lightning 
speed and with tremendous force dash against the hill 
tops sending a cloud of foam above, with the spray 
dancing in the sun. 

But see, the waters halt ! They rise no higher. 
Its fury quelled, the sea grows calm. Its waters sink. 
They vanish into mist. They are gone. The sun, 
once more, shines upon the darkened hills and breaks 
the cloud with his mighty power. It is a " cloud sea." 

The pen is feeble and the thoughts are few. Oh ! 
that I had the power to describe its beauty, that I 
could paint upon the mind a picture of the scene. 
But though " the spirit is willing the flesh is weak." 

This cloud sea, one of natures wonders, is to be seen 
only in the early morning at sunrise or shortly after. 
Resting on the hills, at sunrise, during the months of 
July and August, the clouds assume this peculiar and 
interesting form. And those who are awake with the 
birds feel themselves amply repaid for their early rising. 
The mist is dispersed about eight o'clock and then the 
phenomenon fades away. But description is beggarly 
only a sight can realize its beauty. R. 



C:${chan^fs. 



For the purpose of bringing more clearly before the 
attention of the public the remarkable educational 
advantages offered at low cost by the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, our illustrated issue of April 10, 
has been further revised and adorned with a handsome 
cover design. 

A considerable edition has been reprinted which we 
derire to distribute as widely as possible among the 



preparatory schools of the country. Will our ex- 
changes kindly help in the work by inserting the follow- 
ing notice: 

OF INTEREST TO STUDENTS. 

Those who are contemplating a college education will 
do well to write for a copy of a Special Edition of 
Aggie Life the paper published by the students of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College. It is an attractive 
pamphlet of twenty-four pages, handsomely illustrated 
with engravings of the college buildings and typical 
college scenes, and contains a variety of informa- 
tion directly from the instructors concerning their work, 
a classified list of the faculty, a statement of require- 
ments for admission and of expenses, which for the 
individual are very low,tuition being free. Its purpose is 
stated to be, to bring more clearly before the attention of 
the public the educational,advantages of the State Col- 
lege of Massachusetts. The number of copies is 
limited but, until exhausted, one will be sent free of 
charge to any address furnished the Alumni Advertis- 
ing Committee, Amherst, Mass. 

The Harrisburg High School Argus is a witty and 
exceptionally entertaining paper. 

Captain, to awkward squad ; " When I say halt ! put 
the foot that's on the ground beside the foot that's in 
the air and remain motionless." 

Cushing academy ^^Breeze" contains a well written 
and very interesting article on Mt. Holyoke college. 

The University of Chicago is to have a new club 
house for the use of students. The building will cost 
about $20,000. 

H. Ward, Harvard 1900, won the indoor tennis 
championship of America at a tournament held 
recently in New York. 

The business manager desires this little verse 
inserted in this column: 

The wind bloweth. 
The water floweth, 
The subscriber oweth, 
And the Lord knoweth 

We are in need of our dues. — Ex. 
He kissed her dainty little hand, 

She let it passive lie, 
But with her left she made a swing. 
And biffed him in the eye. — Ex. 



164 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Little grains of powder, 
Little drops of paint, 
Make a lady's freckles 

Look as though they ain't. — Ex. 

The C. A. C. Lookout contains an excellent article 
entitled, "The Art of Correct Spelling." 

The past two weeks have brought in about thirty- 
five exchanges. They vary from high school papers 
to the more pretentious volumes, such as those edited 
by M. I. T. and Holy Cross. They furnish us with 
nev/s of the doings at other colleges and schools which 
can be got at in no other way. Some of the high 
schools are doing excellent work in a literary way, al- 
though there is a marked difference in the editorial 
department between the several papers on our ex- 
change table. 

A dispute has arisen: Are there four, or five dogs 
on the cover of the Latin School Register ? 

The Stylus of Boston College is an especially well- 
bound and well-gotten up volume. 

The Intercollegian prints some very good illustra- 
tions in the April number. 

The Epsilon of the Bridgeport High School is a 
business-like paper, and has a very artistic cover. 

The Cojnus for March shows good ability in its 
neatness and condensed articles of interest. 

The Tech is a good model for all editors to fol- 
low. 

The Tripod of Roxbury Latin School contains an 
excellent series of 'questions on Shakespeare. We 
would suggest that a date be printed in some promi- 
nent place for obvious reasons. 

intfrfolif^la-te. 



"Lounger" in the Tech gives a very witty review of 
the theatricals. 

Amherst college track is being recovered with cin- 
ders and loam. 

Princeton is planning for a new gymnasium which 
will cost about $150,000. 

The University of Pennsylvania has received invi- 
tations for a dual track meet from both Cornell and 
Columbia. As May 1 1 is Pennsylvania's only open 
date a triangular meet may be arranged. 



At the suggestion of President Patton, Princeton 
will very likely adopt the elective system in sopho- 
more year and confer the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
in three years upon those who have completed the 
equivalent of the present four years' course. 

Harvard lost the intercollegiate fencing champion- 
ship in New York Saturday, April 6, for the second 
time in nine years. As Yale could not get a complete 
team together, only Harvard, Columbia, Annapolis 
and Cornell took part. 

The Literary Digest learns through replies from 19 
college magazines that college faculties have nowa- 
days almost nothing to do with the conduct of college 
journalism, and the process of filling staff positions 
through election by the editorial board after various 
competitive tests seems well-nigh universal. Of these 
19 college papers only two, the University of Pennsyl- 
vania Red and Blue and the Wesleyan Literary Magazine 
consult the faculty in filling their editorial chairs. The 
method of competitien by the University of Chicago 
Weekly is the most stringent. Appointments are 
made on the basis of merit, as shown in six months' 
competition among the reporters, to which position 
any student is eligible. Twice each year, in June and 
September, a valuation is made of the amount and 
quality of work done by each reporter and each editor. 
The seven whose work is the most satisfactory become 
the editorial board for the ensuing six months, and 
the others are given places on the waiting list. The 
decision rests with a merit board made up of the man- 
aging and assistant managing editors and a member 
of the English faculty of the university. 



^ 



DRAWING AND BLUE PROCESS PAPERS, 

SCALES, ANGLES, CURVES and T SQUARES, 

ARCHITECTS' AND DRAFTMEN'S COLORS, 

SCHOOL BOXES WATER COLORS, 



WeOSWOBTH, PWliD 

INCORPORATED, 
82 and 84 Washington St., \ -pinQTOM 
216 and 218 Clarendon St., |^^»^'-'^^- 
Factories, MALDEN, MASS, 




VOL. XI. 



AMHERST, MASS., JUNE 5, 1901. 



NO. 13 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will be sent 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT, 1902, Editor-in-Chief. 

LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, 1902, Business Manager. 

WILLIAM ETHERINGTON ALLEN, 1903, Assistant Business Manager. 
VICTOR ADOLPH GATES, 1902, Athletics, CHARLES MILTON KINNEY, 1902, Exchanges. 

RICHARD HENDRIC ROBERTSON, 1903, Department Notes. CLAUDE ISAAC LEWIS, 1902. 

NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN, 1903, College Notes. MYRON HOWARD WEST, 1903, Alumni Notes. 

FAYETTE DICKINSON COUDEN, 1904. ARTHUR LEE PECK, 1904. 

Terms: $1.00 per year in adcance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside of United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 
Foot-Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 
Reading-Room Association, 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

D. N. WEST, Pres. Athletic Association, 

V. A. Gates, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

J. H. Chickering, Sec. Nineteen Hundred and Three Index, 

V. A. Gates, Sec. Fraternity Conference, 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec 
C. L. Rice, Manager. 
G. L. Barrus, Manager. 
C. E. Gordon, Sec. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



Edi'torials. 



The handbook published annually by Y. M. C. A. is 
again before us for notice. Its form has been altered 
in some respects, and in addition to the usual material 
a good deal of general information has also been 
added. The cover is unique, bearing simply the 
letter " M " in gilt on a maroon field. Several new 
devices are noticeable to increase its usefulness to the 
student. We are particularly glad to see that the 
inaccuracies and mistakes which have marred the 
handbook in late years have been removed, and the 
book thoroughly revised and brought up to date. We 
congratulate the handbook committee on its painstak- 
ing work. 



We are glad to note the continued good work of 
our baseball team. In spite of various accidents and 
pieces of ill-luck it bids fair to make for itself a most 
creditable record. In the Maine and Vermont games 
it again proved its ability to play winning ball, while in 
the first defeat of the season, by Trinity, it made a 



showing entirely creditable to the college. The home 
schedule is now completed and the hardest trip of the 
season is now before the team. Complete success 
under such circumstances ought not to be expected. 
There is no doubt however that the team now com- 
mands the confidence of every student, and we may 
feel sure that this confidence will be justified for the 
remainder of the season. 



The address of Senator Gardner to the battalion at 
the annual inspection of the college by the Legislative 
committees, which will be found somev/hat imperfectly 
reported in another column, must be regarded as 
extremely significant. Himself a graduate of a dis- 
tant college. Senator Gardner was able to speak to us 
in an unprejudiced way, and his views must be 
considered as representative of a great body of people 
in this state who would be but too glad to befriend 
this college were its true character made known to 
them. The argument he made for a change of name 
of the college is a strong one, and receives the hearty 
endorsement of the student body. The present title 



1 66 



AGGIE Lll'^K, 



is undoubtedly misleading. It will be asked, " But is 
not the college primarily an agricultural college ? " 
We answer " Yes," to the extent that that those per- 
sons desiring an agricultural training have the best of 
opportunities for obtaining it ; we answer " No," be- 
cause less than twenty-five per cent, as shown by the 
choice of senior electives care for the agricultural 
features of the course. The remaining seventy-five 
per cent, are enrolled in spite of tiiename because they 
know that exceptional opportunities are offered along 
various scientific lines. How large a number have 
been kept away is uncertain ; there can be no doubt 
however that the name has above all things handi- 
capped the college from the very beginning. When 
an institution has existed thirty years without a pre- 
ceptible increase of students over the original enroll- 
ment something it radically wrong. The first class 
entering this college numbered 46; the last class 
numbered 38. During the same time, other state 
institutions such as Pennsylvania State, Cornell, and 
the Mass. Institute of Technology have risen from the 
same small beginning as ourselves to a recognized 
standing in the collegiate world. We believe that 
Senator Gardner was right ; that in no other way can 
the college hope for the truest prosperity ; and that 
those now in authority who are barring the way 
of progress must bear the responsibility for the short- 
comings of the institution. On behalf of the student 
body, we desire to thank Senator Gardner for his ad- 
vocacy of a measure so vital to the best interests of 
the State College of Massachusetts. 



We publish in another column more or less com- 
pletely the remainder of the letters received from the 
alumni on the question of changing the name of the 
college. We may say that in addition brief state- 
ments were also received from several alumni concur- 
ring in the view that a change would be inadvisable 
On May 27th, as had been previously announced, the 
editorial board met and considered the question in 
detail. In view of the strength and unanimity of the 
protests from the alumni, men of age and experience, 
whose opinions we felt bound to respect, it did not 
seem wise to oppose their wishas. Accordingly, by a 
unanimous vote the question was indefinitely post- 
poned. We fear that this action will prove a disap- 
pointment to the student body, whose desires were 



undoubtedly in favor of a change. To them we would 
say that the policy of any journal of this sort must be 
in large measure determined by its subscribers. We 
did not therefore feel justified in making an innova- 
tion so evidently opposed by a majority. That the 
name will be changed eventually we do not doubt ; 
but the outcome of the discussion is that it must not 
precede a change in the name of the College. We 
desire to thank the alumni for the interest they have 
shown in the matter ; after the response they have 
given they cannot be justly charged with indifference. 
It might be said however that as the student body has 
yielded out of deference to the alumni, they have a 
right to expect an equal consideration from the alumni 
on the points which touch them most deeply. On the 
whole while the matter has apparently been left where 
it was before we are not sorry that it was brought up 
for discussion since it may lead to a closer bond of 
union between the students and the alumni. After 
all, their interests are the same, and there should be 
no friction. Perhaps one or two statements ought to 
be made to clear up some false impressions some of 
the alumni seemed to have obtained. In the first 
place, there was never any thought that we were 
ashamed of the term "Aggie." Neither does the 
student body desire to see agriculture and its allies 
dropped from our curriculum. The students respect 
the Senior electing Agriculture just as highly as the 
one who chooses, let us say, Mathematics or English. 
But they do contend, and we think rightly, that no one 
branch should be exalted above another, and they 
claim that no one study, especially one in which sev- 
enty-five per cent, care nothing about, should be 
taken as typical of the work of an entire institution. 
Let the courses in agriculture be improved and ex- 
tended to the fullest degree and every student will 
rejoice. But let them be made elective. Provide 
other courses for which there is a demand and let the 
students choose those which they desire. Many of 
our alumni also seem to feel that we have acted too 
hastily. It may be of interest to some of these to 
learn that the movement to change the name of the 
paper did not originate either with the board or even 
with the student body, but with a committee of the 
alumni themselves. This committee was organized 
for advertising purposes and decided to use as a 
medium the Aggie Life. They felt that in view of 



AGGIE LIFE. 



167 



the misleading nature of the word " Aggie " a change 
in the title would be desirable. It was not that 
" Aggie " was misleading to the alumni or the student 
body, but to the prospective student. Accordingly the 
committee laid the matter last term before the out- 
going board of editors. This board delayed action 
and the problem was transmitted to the incoming 
board. It was our duty to consider it and we did so. 
We took a test vote of the student body and it proved 
favorable to a change. We then laid the matter be- 
fore the alumni, and allowed a month for discussion. 
At the end of the time we found that the objections 
were too numerous, and so laid the matter upon the 
table. The board never recommended a change, and 
was not particularly desirous of it. Perhaps we were 
hasty ; but considering that the board had ample 
power to change the name once and for all without 
any notice whatever, we think there is some reason 
to doubt it. However, be that as it may, the question 
is now settled, at least for a time. It remains only 
for all to abide by the decision. 



CONFIDENCE SUSTAINED. 

" No, John," said Mr. Foster decisively, " I do not 
care to discuss this matter further. You have made 
a mistake and I don't want you to let such a thing 
happen again." 

''Very well, sir," returned John carefully restraining 
the words of defiance that were about to leap from his 
mouth. " It will be as you see fit." And with a 
formal bow he left the room. 

John Trenton was a protege of Mr. James I. Foster, 
a wealthy New York land-owner. Through the death 
of his wife and only child many years previous Mr. 
Foster had become afflicted with a feeling of loneli- 
ness which gave rise to a desire to benefit others. 
About six months before, he had succeeded in rescue- 
ing John Trenton from a drunkard's grave. One bitter 
cold night he had found him unconscious in an alley 
not far from his home. A good warm bed and ten 
hours of sleep put the unfortunate on his feet again, 
and partly out of gratitude towards Mr. Foster, partly 
from a sudden whim of his own, John Trenton deter- 
mined to turn over a new leaf and start life afresh. 

Mr. Foster very naturally thought that as resolutions 
are easily made and broken, Trenton might err from 
his new course of life and return to his dissipations of 



the past. But in this, he showed himself totally 
unacqcainted with John's character. In fact, as he 
came to know him better, the wealthy land-owner 
began to wonder how a man of such determined will 
could ever have taken to drink. As Mr. Foster con- 
tinued to find out every day, when John made up his 
mind on a certain course to pursue, no power on 
earth, short of death itself, could swerve him from it. 
***** 

On that particular morning, John closed the office 
door firmly and without losing his temper, but there 
was rage in his heart. It was such a trifling thing for 
Mr. Foster to take exception to. John had recom- 
mended that a certain mortgage be allowed to run on, 
where Mr. Foster wished it foreclosed. Although it 
was not Trenton's place to dictate to his employer, he 
had urged the matter so strongly that the wealthy real 
estate owner closed the matter without further 
argument. 

•' Confound the old fool," muttered John as he 
slipped on his hat and coat. Cursing the world in 
general and his employer in particlar, he soon found 
his way down town and towards some of his old haunts 
on the Bowery. He strolled along, deep in thought, 
scarcely noticing the familiar locality into which his 
steps were unconsciously carrying him. Suddenly a 
hand was laid on his shoulder and a hoarse voice 
shouted in his ear. 

" By all that's powerful ! If it ain't Whiskered 
Andy 1 Why me boy, I thought you were dead. And 
you look slick as an alderman, or a drummer, or a 
hotel manager. An' yer dressed fine too. Wher've 
you been ? Klondyke ? You've got the cut of the 
governor of the state and the air of a millionaire's son. 
Give us a tip on what it all means." 

" What the devil do you \vant of me, Jim Rogers," 
exclaimed John as soon as he got a chance, turning 
angrily on his questioner. 

" Well, now you act as if you weren't a bit glad to 
see me. An' we used to be such good friends. Come 
in here and have something, jest so we can talk over 
old times." 

" I've given up drinking," returned John slowly, 
•' But I don't mind setting you up. I've left off the 
old life for good, though my old friends still remain." 

They crossed the street to a cheap hotel, ordered a 
private room, and Jim Rogers was soon indulging in 



i68 



AGGIE LIFE 



his favorite beverage. John Trenton merely smoked 
a cigar. 

Jim was apparently not in the best of circumstances 
— a quarter inch growth of beard, a bloated face, a 
broken derby hat, and a tattered coat were evidences 
of his financial condition. 

" It seems mighty strange yer don't join me," he 
began, as he supped his whiskey and water. " What 
yer doin' now-a-days?" 

John told him in as few words as possible of his 
history up to date, ending with his little difference 
with Mr. Foster. Jim seemed to take this latter 
incident very much to heart. 

" Course he was wrong. I'd back you any day, for 
knowing more about mortgages than him. An' be 
you a goin' to stand an' let a man walk over you like 
that? 'Tain't like you Andy? Ain't ye goin' ter 
touch him up fer a few thousand ? You know the 
place as you've worked in the office. We can fix up 
a check or blow up the safe. I'll bet that's what you 
come hunting me up for." 

His companion's fervor was not infused into John 
Trenton. He calmly 'surveyed Jim Rogers' bloated 
face. His eye glistened. 

" You need not excite yourself by a false hope. I 
told you distinctly that I had given up my past life. 
You decidedly overlook the fact that I did not come 
here in quest of you." 

" Oh ! That sounds cool and high flown for you, but 
it don't wash with me. Do you remember the Ashton 
Bank Robbery. The police are looking for a man 
named Whiskered Andy for that job. Same with the 
Wilkinson diamond deal, an' that forged check of 
young Haswell's. Look here Mr. Whiskered Andy, 
I've got enough proof here to give you thirty years. 
Come now, will you do your end of the job ? " 

" You can't bluff me Jim Rogers. You can't shake 
my determination. The police want me I know, but 
they also want you." 

" That's true, Andy, but I'm goin' to visit that safe 
up to Foster's house that you told me of. You can 
help me or not, but if you try to put anyone onto me, 
it will be all up with you for twenty years even if I 
have to keep you company." 

John gave Rogers a warning not to try and left the 
room. 

* * * # * 



About an hour and a half after midnight a week 
latter, Mr. Foster's residence was the scene of a very 
interesting and exciting pantomine. John Trenton was 
on the watch in the library when he could get a good 
look at the room and surrounding object without 
being seen. He heard a slight noise from the hall. 

"Jim Rogers thinks I'm afraid of his tongue does 
he ? We'll see about that. I feel pretty sure he'll be 
here to-night, Lucky old Foster's out of town. 
Hello ! there comes some one. It's Jim too. 
Wonder how he got in ? 

At that moment a figure entered the door and gropped 
its way to the safe. John heard keys jingling as they 
were tried one after another. Then the safe door flew 
open. It was enough. With one spring John was 
upon the kneeling figure and in a moment held him 
bound with cords already prepared. Then he slipped 
out of the room with the Intention of ringing the police 
alarm. 

"Seems queer," John muttered, " he didn't make 
much fuss. He's drunk. That's it. But what on 
earth did he mean by yelling for the police and calling 
my name. Oh 1 he's jagged all right." 

The police in response to his summons arrived a 
few moments later. John led the way to the library. 
Then as a match was struck, he glanced at the prisoner 
and received such a shock that the perspiration stood 
out in cold beads on his forehead, 

The person lying bound on the floor was none other 
than the millionaire land owner, Mr. J. T. Foster. 
***** 

No, John Trenton was not dismissed when the whole 
story come out. 

Mr. Foster had come home late that night and Jim 
Rogers was arrested and given two months for 
drunkenness. 



THE BIRTHPLACE OF WHITTIER. 

In journeying from Haverhill to Amesbury Mass, 
you are permitted to enjoy some of the most beauti- 
ful pictures of New England scenery. Here the sight- 
s eer can also find points of historic interest. After 
descending a steep hill you are quite surprised to find 
a large stone monument, and upon closer inspection 
you are informed that it marks the birthplace of the 
poet, Whittier. 

A short walk down a sandy road brings you to an 



AGGIE LIFE. 



i6g 



old wooden bridge which spans a shallow gurgling 
brook and at this point you obtain the first view of the 
old two-storied frame house such as were built in New 
England a hundred or so years ago. 

For a small sum you are permitted to enter the 
house where a polite attendant will show you what 
there is to see of interest. You are at once im- 
pressed with the simplicity which is so apparent every- 
where. Unfortunately many of the Whittier heir- 
looms have been scattered far and wide, but thanks 
to the efforts of his many friends, who have formed 
themselves into a society, many of the old 
treasures have been secured and replaced. In the 
old parlor there is an oil painting of Whittier, the 
work of J. L. Smith. It is very easy to read, in the 
face, the beautiful character of the poet who will al- 
ways remain dear to the American people and to 
whom we can point, as the Scotch do to Burns, for 
Whittier is our true national poet. In this room is 
also to be found some old books, medallions, sam- 
ples, and some quite badly worn furniture. It is in the 
adjoining room where our interest is keenly aroused. 
This is arranged as nearly as possible as it was in 
Whittier's boyhood days. A very large room which 
served as kitchen, dining and living room. The first 
object to attract your attention is the great fire-place 
and at once the picture in " Snow Bound " flashes to 
your brain. Here is the old log and the twigs. Before 
it is the row of polished apples and the cider mug is 
not forgotten. Here also are the Turk's head andirons, 
the crane, and hanging trammels. On the shelf is a 
collection of candle moulds, warming pans and old 
cooking utensils, and from the nail hangs the old bulls 
eye watch. How vividly you could imagine the fire- 
place scene. Here the Whittier family gathered and 
in the ruddy light sat and listened to the Indian leg- 
ends, for the Merrimac valley is famed for its Indian 
lore and the elder Whittier had spent his early days in 
the wilds of Maine and Canada. At times the subject 
changed to stories of hunting and witchcraft, and 
doubtless Whittier received from these stories the in- 
spiration to write his Indian legends. The room is 
finished roughly and overhead at frequent intervals 
are the old sagging beams, and doubtless from these 
was hung the annual supply of seed and herbs. All 
the furnishings of the room are of course old-fash- 
ioned. On one side is an old side-board with glass 



doors and in this is neatly arranged the old family 
china. Passing up one or two steps you enter a 
small room, the one in which the poet was born. 
There are but a few articles in the room, an old- 
fashioned bed, a bureau and a few chairs. After 
climbing up a rickety pair of stairs, you are escorted 
into a large dimly lighted attic — the bed-room of the 
Whittier boys. We can scarcely imagine a more 
dismal place for a young boy. Here on a stormy 
winter's night the snow was blown in and deposited in 
small drifts. A few of the old chinks can still be 
seen. 

There are also several points of interest outside the 
buildings. At the back door there is a large flat stone. 
It was here in the summer twilight that Whittier ate 
his bowl of bread and milk and in later years the 
thought of these evenings led him to write " The Bare- 
foot Boy." At the corner of the house is the old 
well and the sweep is still preserved. Leading from 
the well to the adjoinfng wood is a small footpath 
whicn brings you to the " brook." This was one of 
the poet's favorite resorts. He spent many happy 
hours here and learned the lessons nature had in 
store for him. 

From a large hill behind the house a fine view can 
be obtained of the valley. Here the boy used to 
climb to watch the Merrimac in its windings till it 
reached the ocean in the distance and in a very clear 
day he could catch a glimpse of the white sails. 
Around the farm buildings are a few cultivated fields. 
It was here that the poet worked performing the ordi- 
nary farm drudgery. He received very little encour- 
agement from his father who was a rather stern 
pastoral man who believed it more important for his 
son to become a good farmer than a poet. But 
one day Garrison came to him and induced him 
to try to obtain a better education. As a result of 
these days we are indebted to Whittier for some of 
his best works. Besides the two already mentioned 
these are : " Telling the Bees," " Maud Muller," 
" Among the Hills," and many of his New England 
legends. 



Mr. Rockefeller has added $1,500,000 to his pre- 
vious gifts to Chicago university. Of this $1,000,000 
is to constitute a part of the endowment, and $500,- 
000 will be available for immediate need. 



170 



AGGIE LIFE. 



COMMUNICATIONS. 

May 20, 1901. 
Mr. H. L. Knight, Editor-in-chief, Aggie Life, 
Amherst, Massachusetts. 
Dear Sir : — I am decidedly In favor of retaining 
the name Aggie Life for the paper published by the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College. I can see no 
good reason for a change of name and certainly the 
name "Aggie " is dear to every alumnus of the Col- 
lege. 

I do not think the editorial in the issue of May 15th 
is just when it says " the alumni are rather indifferent 
than otherwise." When the writer of the article be- 
comes an alumnus and actively engaged in work he 
will realize my criticism with greater force than two 
columns of print would convince him now. I am. 
Yours very truly, 
H. D. Hemenway, M. a. C, '95, 



Mr. H. L. Knight, Editor-in-chief, Aggie Life, 
Amherst, Mass. 
Dear Sir : — Three of us here in Elizabeth protest 
against any change of name in the College journal, 
and deprecate the change in sentiment among the 
undergraduates which permits such a proposition to 
be discussed. We cannot but believe that the ele- 
ment among the students which desires a change of 
name is influenced by motives unworthy of loyal sons 
of " Old Aggie," and is, withal, ill-advised. 
Yours truly, 

R. B. Moore, '88, 
F. J. Smith, '90, 
F. L. Arnold, '91. 
Elizabeth, N. J., May 20, 1901. 



Natick, Mass., May 18, 1901. 
Aggie Life Editors, Amherst, Mass. 

Gentlemen: — Noting your disappointment at the 
mieagre number of replies to the question which seems 
to be uppermost in your minds, ■ I hasten to suggest 
that probably most of the alumni, like myself, have 
not taken your suggestion seriously. Surely you must 
know that those who have gone before you have been 
all through this same changing mania. Change the 
name 1 Why, we had more enthusium than that. 



We wanted to change everything ; change the name, 
change the courses, change the instructors, in fact 
change the college, but, thanks to the restraining in- 
fluence of older heads than ours, we always recovered 
in good order. 

The effects of the elimination of the word " Aggie " 
from the College institutions are too far reaching to 
be lightly set aside by undergraduates of the College, 
Gentlemen, you are in too much haste in this matter. 
Allow me to suggest that the proper time and place 
for an expression of opinion from the alumni is at the 
annual meeting at Amherst during commencement. 
Very respectfully yours, 
Alexander Montgomery, Jr., M. A. C, '98. 



103 Belmont St., Cambridge, Mass., 
May 23, 19ol. 
To the Editor of Aggie Life, M. A. C, Amherst, 
Mass. 

Dear Sir : — There being only a few communica- 
tions in the last Aggie Life, concerning the chang- 
ing of the name of the College paper, I feel it my 
duty to express my opinion. I notice all who have 
taken the trouble to express their opinion in the last 
Life, are in favor of the old name. 

And for my part I can see no object in changing 
the name. What could be more expressive and com- 
pact ? 

Why is the agricultural part so offensive ? Is not 
the M. A. C. still an agricultural college? I under- 
stand there has been considerable discussion about 
the changing of the name of the College to drop the 
agricultural part of it, and now the discussion has fal- 
len upon the name of the College paper, with an 
effort to drop the word " Aggie," a word which is be- 
loved by every true friend of the College and the 
name which is given to the College by nearly all old 
alumni. Aggie has become an established name and 
why can it not be fittingly applied to the paper of the 
institution which has nurtured it so long, practically 
from the beginning ? 

For my part 1 can see no disgrace either in refer- 
ring to the college paper as an Aggie paper or in re- 
ferring to the College as an Agricultural College. 
Yours very truly, 

M. A. Carpenter, '91. 



AGGIE LIFE- 



171 



Kent Chemical Laboratory, 
Yale University, 
New Haven, Conn., 
May 16, 1901. 
Mr. H. L. Knight, Editor-in-chief, Aggie Life, 
Amherst, Mass. 
Dear Mr. Knight: — The discussion concerning 
the nanie of the college paper interests me very much. 
I say let it be Aggie Life as it always has been. 
What is to be gained in a change of name ? If the 
paper is a good paper, as it certainly is, it will com- 
mand-the respect of all who read it no matter under 
what name it is published. I should feel very much 
as if I were receiving a stranger if the college paper 
came to me under any other name than Aggie Life. 
Yours truly, 

Charles A. Peters, '97. " 



Saxonville. Mass., May 25, 1901. 
Mr. H. L. Knight, Editor-in-ghief, Aggie Life, 
Amherst, Mass. 

My Dear Sir : — I am decidedly in favor of retain- 
ing the present name, Aggie Life. 

For old Aggie, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
our Alma Mater, Aggie Life is a name well adapted 
for the name of its paper. 

If the institution has extended its arms into broader 
fields than its name, or the name of its paper, ex- 
presses, so much the better. Now let the paper pre- 
sent these facts to the public, keeping the college in 
touch with those seeking for a college education. 

Why change the name ? Do you think that by 
changing the name of our College paper, it will bring 
our College into more prominence, or by retaining the 
present name, the institution will be less thought of 
or prevent our classes being filled ? Is the trouble 
with the name in the term, " Aggie ? " Is it preju- 
dice or dislike toward agriculture or anything the 
word suggests ? 

I fear that is where all the trouble lies. The Mas- 
sachusetts Agricultural College, "Old Aggie" has 
won its way into the hearts of many ; so has its repre- 
sentative the Aggie Life. 

Life at Aggie. What is it, or what has it been? 
Just what we, students of the present and of the 
future are going to make it. So will our paper, as 



has been said by another, be a " reflection of the life 
and activities of the student body." 

Aggie Life has a reputation, let it so stand ; let it 
continue to fulfil its mission. From the very first, 
have watched the paper with much interest. Shall 
continue to do so as long as it represents my Alma 
Mater. I sincerely hope the name Aggie Life will 
be retained. May it be the means of bringing the 
students, alumni, faculty and officers into closer touch 
with each other than ever before. 
Respectfully yours, 
Arthur H. Sawyer, M. A. C, '91. 



VISIT OF THE LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEES. 

The annual inspection of the college by the Legis- 
lative committees on education, agriculture and mili- 
tary affairs took place on May 17th. About forty 
members with their wives were present. A reception 
in their honor was given by President Goodell at his 
home on the evening of the 16th. The following 
morning the party attended chapel at the college. 
Here they were welcomed by president Goodell. In 
an appropriate speech he referred to the most serious 
needs of the college, and especially the need for a new 
boarding house, a new chemical laboratory and a new 
library building. An exhibition drill on the campus 
by the battalion drew much applause from the party. 
The address to the college was made by Senator 
Gardner of the committee on military affairs. Sena- 
tor Gardner complimented the battalion on their cred- 
itable work and expressed his surprise at the flourish- 
ing condition of the college. He regretted to say 
that he did not believe the college was as well-known 
throughout the state as its fine standing deserved. 
Fully 80 per cent of the people of the state in his 
opinion were ignorant either of the existence of the 
institution or entirely at sea as to the true scope and 
nature of its work. This unfortunate condition of 
affairs was due quite largely to the name of the college. 
Could it be called the Massachusetts State College 
instead, he felt sure that its influence would be largely 
increased. He also spoke of the unsatisfactory way 
in which our athletic events are recorded in the news- 
papers. How was a person to know that when a game 
was published as "Aggie, 13; Univ. of Maine 9," 
that the state college of Massachusetts was meant ? 
Because of this poor system of reporting, almost all 



172 



AGGIE LIFE. 



of the credit attaching itself to a college of strong 
athletic abilities was lost to us. In conclusion he 
pledged himself to do all in his power to aid the col- 
lege. After the drill, the student body gave a hearty 
yell for Senator Gardner. The artillery detachment 
fired a salute of ten guns in honor of the visitors after 
which according to custom college exercises for the 
day were suspended. After a careful inspection of 
the buildings and grounds the Legislative party returned 
to Boston, well-pleased with their visit. 



SUMMER SCHOOL OF FORESTRY. 

The first annual session of the Yale summer school 
of Forestry will be held at " Grey Towers," the estate 
of Mr. J. W. Pinchot, near the village of Milford, Pike 
Co., Pa. The course, beginning July 8, will continue 
eight weeks and will be in charge of Profs, H. S, 
Graves and J. W. Tourney. 

The purpose of the Summer School is to provide 
instruction for those who do not wish to take, or are 
not ready for, the more advanced technical courses at 
regular Forest Schools. The course is designedly (1) 
for owners of woodland and others wishing to obtain a 
knowledge of the principles of Forestry and a practical 
acquaintance with its branches ; (2) for persons who 
wish to fit themselves for practical work as forest 
rangers; (3) for teachers in Agricultural, Industrial 
and other schools in which Nature Study and Botany 
are taught ; (4) for persons desiring to acquire a gen- 
eral knowledge of Forestry or any of its branches, 
especially Forest Botany; (5) for students of Forestry 
deficient in certain subjects. There will also be an 
excellent opportunity for advanced students to carry 
on a special work under the immediate supervision of 
Professors Graves and Tourney. 

The five regular courses, of which the student may 
take all or select only a portion, are as follows : For- 
est Botany, Silviculture, Forest Measurements, Intro- 
duction to Forestry, and Forest Protection. Practical 
work in the neighboring woods will form a very impor- 
tant part of the instruction. Frequent excursions will 
be made with Professor Tourney in charge, in order to 
familiarize the student with the habits and growth of 
the trees, shrubs and flora of the vicinity. 

The site of the Summer School combines the 
advantages of excellent opportunities for practical for- 
est study and field work and of a pleasant and health- 



ful summer resort. Milford lies on the west bank of 
the Delaware River not far from the boundary line of 
New York and New Jersey, and is reached from Port 
Jervis, N. Y. on the Erie railroad. The village has 
ample accommodations for visitors in several large 
hotels and boarding houses. 

The school building stands on a hill overlooking 
Milford from which it is about a mile distant. It is 
situated in a picturesque region and overlooks a wide 
extent of the beautiful Delaware Valley. Less than a 
quarter of a mile from the school is the glen of the 
Sawkill with the well-known Sawkill Falls. 

Through the generosity of Mr. James W. Pinchot 
the school has been thoronghly equipped for the pur- 
poses of instruction. The building contains a hall 
capable of seating 100 persons and two smaller rooms, 
one of which will be used as a laboratory and the 
other as a special library and reading-room. Besides 
the woods on the estate, one of the Pennsylvania 
State Forest Reservations near by will be available 
for study. The excellent collection of books on For- 
estry in the Milford Library, especially intended for 
the use of the students of the summer school, will be 
of great service. 

For the accommodation of those who desire to live 
in the school camp, not more than 25 large, comfort- 
ably furnished tents will be provided as also board, by 
the school at a reasonable rate. This camp will be 
situated on high, dry ground near the Sawkill Falls. 
Board and lodgings may also be procured in the vil- 
lage. The tuition fee will be $20 for the term of 
eight weeks. There are no entrance examinations. 
The advantages of the school are open to men and 
women alike. Candidates must however be at least 
17 years of age. Applications for admission should 
be sent to Professor Graves, 360 Prospect St., N. 
Haven, at once. 



FOOT BALL SCHEDULE 1901. 

Sept. 28. Holy Cross at Worcester. 

Oct. 5. Middlebury at Amherst. 

9. Trinity at Hartford. 

12. Wesleyan at Middletown. 

16. Williams at Williamstown. 

19. Worcester Tech. at Worcester. 

24. Bates College at Amherst. 

Nov. 2. Springfield Training School at Amherst. 

9. Amherst at Pratt Field. 

16. Storrs at Amherst. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



»73 



oUe^f f^otfs, 



— The electric cars are running to Sunderland. 

— Gilbert 1 904 has joined tha College Shakespearean 
Club. 

— The band gave a very fine concert on the campus 
last week. 

— J. W. Gregg recently spent Sunday in Gardner 
as the guest of H. L. Knight. 

The Q. T. V. fraternity rooms are soon to be moved 
to the third floor in North college. 

— G. L. Barrs and P. W. Brooks spent last week 
in Goshen at the home of the former. 

— Preparations are being made so that North Col- 
lege dormitory will be heated by steam. 

— The Charitable committee of the Legislature re- 
cently spent a day's outing at the college. 

— C. A. Tinker 1903 has gone to Buffalo to look 
after the College exhibit at the Pan-American. 

The Junior class have chosen Gates, Hall, Claflin 
and Morse to aid the Senior " Prom." committee. 

— Prof. Maynard recently lectured before the grange 
in Sunderland, his subject being " Country Roads." 

— Hereafter the fee of twenty-five cents will be 
charged for the privilege of ascending Mt. Sugar Loaf. 

— The Drill Hall is be remodeled and a room is 
being fitted up for the use of the Athletic teams. 
Shower-baths, rubbing tables, lockers etc are being put 
in place. 

— Quite a number of prospective freshmen have 
visited the College recently and all seem to be greatly 
pleased with the institution. 

— There is at present a bill before the legislature 
calling for an appropriation of five-hundred ($500) 
dollars for the use of the band. 

— On May 17th the Senior " Polycons " defeated 
the Sophomores in a close and very exciting game of 
ball. Polycons 8 : Sophomores 7. 

— J^t the preliminary speaking held on Saturday, 
May 25th., the faculty chose the following men to com- 
pete in the Burnham prize speaking: Sophomores, H. 
J. Franklin. W. W. Peebles, E. G Proulx and F. W. 
Webster; Freshmen, F. D. Couden, J. W. Gregg, C. 
H. Griffin and R. R. Raymoth. 



— During the coming summer all the wooden build- 
ing about the college are to be repainted. The work 
will be under the charge of J. R. Perry '93. 

— M. F. Ahearn had his knee quite seriously injured 
in the Univ. of Maine ball game. He has been under 
the care of a doctor for several weeks but is once again 
outside and will probably be in the game again this 
week. 

— Attention is called to the Senior Prom, of Tues- 
day, June 18th. No pains should be spared to bring 
into prominence the social side of our college life, 
and we hope that the Prom, will receive the hearty 
support of students and alumni. Invitations may be 
obtained of W. D. Whitman, '01. 

— With the winning of the Univ. of Vermont game 
closed the list of the four scheduled home games each 
one of which has been won by the home team. The 
students showed their appreciation of the good work 
which the team is doing by building a large bonfire on 
the campus. The celebration was kept up until a very 
late hour. 

— The Legislature paid the college its annual visit 
on May 17th. After chapel the Battalion had dress 
parade and review followed by a short battalion drill 
and drill by the Artillery Detatchment which included 
the firing of a salute of ten guns in honor of the visitors. 
During the drill chairman Gardner of the Military 
committee made a very fine address on changing the 
name of the college. After the drill the party spent 
the remainder of the day in inspecting the college. 
College exercises for the day were dispensed with. 

— The Freshman defeated the Amherst High School 
on the campus last Saturday by the score of 5 to 4. 
The game was loosely played but enlivened by a num- 
ber of remarkable plays and quite exciting at times. 
Bowler played the best game for the Freshmen, though 
Newton made a sensational one-handed catch at second 
and Gregg played well at third. Crook and Chapman 
did good work for the High school. The score: 



'04. 



Bowler, s.p., 
Newton, 2., 
Heffenreffer, c, 
Gregg, 3., 
Cummings, I., 
Fahey, r,, 
Handy, m., 
Raynnoth, 1., 
Griffin, p. s., 

Total 



A.B. 


B. 


P.O. 


A. 


E 


2 





1 


1 





3 


1 


2 





1 


2 





4 


1 


1 


3 





4 


1 


n 


3 


1 


5 


2 


?. 


3 














3 





2 





1 


4 





2 








3 


I 












22 



21 



174 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Donahey, c, 
Baker, s., 
Chapman, p,, 
Cook, 2., 
Foley, 2., 
Ward, 1., 
Cobb, m., 
Towne, 1 .' 
Bridgman, r. , 



1904 
A. H. S. 



A.B. 


B. 


P.O. 




A. 


E. 


3 





5 




4 





3 


1 


4 







1 


3 


2 







1 





3 


1 


2 







1 


3 













1 


2 





2 







1 


3 





2 










2 





3 










2 
















24 


4 


18 




5 


4 




1 1 


2 





1 


—5 




1 











3—4 



Runs— Bowler 2, Heffenreffer 2, Raymoth, Donahey 2, Baker Bridgman. 
Two base hit — Griffin. First base on errors — '04 3. Stolen bases, Baker, 
Chapman, Ward, Towne, Bowler 2, Haffenreffer 2, Cummings. Bases on 
balls — o'f Griffin 5, off Chapman 5. Struck out — by Bowler 2, by Chapman 
4. Umpire, Bodfish. 



^thletic Po"tfS. 



Aggie, 3 : Univ. of Maine 9. 

On Tuesday May 14 Aggie defeated Maine on the 
campus by a score of 13 to 9. The game was poorly 
played by both sides. Bodfish was not up to his usual 
form allowing eight hits and eleven bases on balls. 
Ross for Maine had better control allowing only four 
bases on balls. Aggie out batted Maine having thirteen 
hits, a home run and two two base hits. The feature 
of the game was O'Hearn's home run. 

For Aggie Paul, Graves and OHearn played the best 
game while Dorticos and Batcheler excelled for Maine. 



Paul, s., 
O'Hearn, 3.2,, 
Graves, m., 
Cummings, 1., 
Bodfish, p., 
A'Hearn, 2., 
Gregg, 3,, 
Bowier, r.. 
Cook, c, 
Harris, r. 1,, 

Total 



Holmes, ra., 
Carr, 2., 
Chase, c, 
Davis, 3., 
Weober, s., 
Dorticos, I., 
Batcheler. r. I. 
Russell, r., 
Ross, p., 



2 
3 
I 

1 1 





10 




40 


13 


27 


19 


8 


UNIV. OF MAINE. 










A.B. 


B. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


5 


1 


1 








5 








1 





3 


1 


11 


1 


1 


5 


3 


2 


1 


1 


5 


1 





2 


4 


5 


1 


5 








4 





2 








1 





3 





1 


4 


I 





1 


1 



Total 36 8 24 6 7 

M, A. C. 114 2 10 4—13 

U. of M. 12 5 0—9 

Runs— Paul 2, OHearn 2, Graves 2, Cummings 3, Bodfish 3, Gregg. 
Cook, Holmes, Carr, Chase 2, Dorticos, Russell, Ross. Stolen bases- 
Holmes 3. Carr, Chase, Russell 2, Paul, Bodfish, Gregg. — Two base hits — 
Bodfish, Gregg. — Three base hits— Davis. Home run — O'Hearn. First 
base on balls- off Bodfish 1 1 , off Ross 4. Struck out— by Bodfish5,|Ross 8. 
Passed balls — Chase, Cook. Time 2 hrs. Umpire Smith. 

Trinity, 3 ; Aggie, 2. 
Aggie met its first defeat of the season at Hartford 
on Friday, May 24, by a score of 3 to 2. Both 



teams fielded well, Aggie having only one error and 
Trinity two, none of which were costly. 

Aggie was first at bat and went out in one, two, 
three order. For Trinity Fiske and Goodrich were 
fielded out. Henderson was given his base on balls 
and was advanced to third on a hit by Mann. Henry 
hit safe scoring Henderson and advancing Mann to 
third. On a hit by Van De Water Mann scores. 
Brigham is fielded out, making a score 2 to 0. 
Neither side scored in the second or third inning, but 
in third botn sides got a double play. 

In the fourth O'Hearn hit for two bases and scored 
on a hit by Graves the next three men were fielded 
out. In the eighth inning Aggie makes another run, 
tying the score, two to two. 

The ninth inning was exciting. Bodfish was up 
for Aggie and was caught out by Townsend, Cook 
flied out and Fiske held Pierson's hard drive to third. 
This was Aggie's last opportunity to score. Town- 
send of Trinity hit safe. Brown was thrown out by 
O'Hearn. Fiske drove a long fly to Graves who 
caught it but was unable to prevent Townsend from 
scoring from third, making score 3 to 2 in Trinity's 
favor. 

The feature of the game was the catch of a line hit 
by Graves which prevented two m.en from scoring, a 
double play by Bodfish, O'Hearn and Cummings, and 
one by Fiske, Townsend and Brigham. 



Paul, 2., 
O'Hearn, 2., 
Graves, m., 
Cummings I . 
Bodfish, p.. 
Cook, c, 
Pierson, r., 
Harris, 1,, 
Gregg. 3., 

Total, 



Fiske, 3., 
Goodrice, p.. 
Henderson, 3., 
Mann, 1., 
Henry, c, 
Van De Water, m., 
Brigham, 1., 
Townsend, 2., 
Brown, r., 

Total, 

Innings, 
Trinity, 
M. A. C, 

At bat— M. A. C. 3 1 , Trinity 32. Base on balls— off Bodfish 5, off Good- 
rich 1. Two base hits— O'Hearn, Fiske. Struck out— by Bodfish 4 .Good- 
rich 2. Hit by pitched ball— Bodfish, Gregg. Time— 1 hr., 35 m. Um- 
pire— J. D, Plymn, of Trinity. 








1 







1 










1 


4 




3 










1 


1 


















14 























4 













-} 


















2 












1 






1 


1 
2 





2 




1 


2 




4 


26 




10 


1 


TRINITY. 














R. 




B. 


P.O. 




A. 


E. 







1 


3 












1 
1 







1 



1 
1 




7 
3 














1 


7 















1 


1 







1 




1 




1 
1 


1 1 

2 





5 




1 







1 


1 










3 




7 


27 




15 


2 


1 


2 


8 4 


5 6 


7 


8 


9 


2 

















1—3 








1 








1 


0—2 



AGGIE LIFE. 



175 



Aggie, 10 ; Univ. of Vermont, 9. 

Aggie added another victory to her Hst by defeating 
the University of Vermont on the campus May 21 by 
a score of 10 to 9. The game was loosely played, 
both teams having a number of costly errors in which 
Aggie excelled, having eleven errors to her credit. 
Aggie won the game by timely hitting which in some 
measure made up for her errors, without which her 
victory would have been more decisive. 

Graves at center played a good game and led the 
teams in batting with a triple and a single, the former 
scoring two men. Cook and Cummings also played 
good ball. Cook having three singles to his credit. 

For the visitors Reed at third, Wasson at catch 
and Hutchinson at second did the best individual play- 
ing. The score : 



Paul, s., 
O'Hearn, 2 , 

Graves, m., 
Cummings, 1. 
Bodfish, p., 
Pierson, 1., 
Cook, c, 
Gregg, 3., 
Halligan, r., 



A.B. 

5 
5 
5 
4 
5 
4 
4 
5 
4 



1 
13 


7 
2 
2 



Total, 


41 

U. OF V. 


12 


27 


16 


11 




A.B. 


B. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


Robinson, 1. s,. 


5 





1 





I 


Wasson, c, 


5 





4 








O'Halloran, m.. 


5 


1 


3 





1 


Orton, 1., 


5 


1 


13 


1 





Willis, s., 


5 


2 


2 


3 


4 


Reed, 3., 


5 


2 


2 


3 


n 


Kinlock, r., 


4 


4 











Hutchinson, 2., 


4 





1 


6 





Taylor, p.. 


4 


2 





3 





Fogg, 1., 


1 















24 14 6 

4 5 6 7 8 9 

3 10 2 0—10 

2 2 3 1 



Total, 42 

Innings, 1 2 3 

M. A. C, 3 1 

U. ofV., 1 

Runs— Paul 2, O'Hearn 2, Graves 4, Cummings, Cook, Wasson, O'Hal- 
laran, Orton, Willis 3, Reed 3, Hutchinson. Total bases— M. A. C, 14, 
U. of v., 9. Stolen bases— O'Hearn 2, Graves, Cummings, Cook, Gregg, 
Halligan, O'Halloran, Orton, Reed, Taylor. Two base hit— Orton. Three 
base hit— Graves. First base on ball— off Taylor 3. S;ruck out— by Bod- 
fish 7, by Taylor 3. Passed balls— Cook, Wasson. Left on bases — M. A. 
C, 10.— U. of v.— 5. Time— 2 hr., 15 m. Umpire— Halligan. 



umni. 



'91. — Arthur H. Sawyer, Saxonville, Mass. 

'95. — The Life has received the communication 
from Elias D. White, to the effect that he was not 
the victim of the recent hold-up on the Central of 
Ga. R. R, as was stated in our last issue. We con- 
gratulate Mr. White for not being compelled to enjoy 
such a privilege. 



'95. — Waldo L. Bemis, Spencer, Mass. 

'93. — John R. Perry, who is at present in the 
paint business with his father in Boston will aid the 
College during the coming season, in the work of 
paintinp the wooden buildings belonging to the Col- 
lege. 

'95. — The marriage is announced of C. W. Cre- 
hore to Miss Alice Rowley, at Chicopee, May 8th, 
1901. At home after June 20th, 357 Chicopee St., 
Chicopee, Mass. 

'97. — Charles A. Peters delivered an address be- 
fore the Chemical club of the Yale university. May 
25th on the " Determination of Persulphates." 

'99. — Howard E. Maynard of M. I. T. will accom- 
pany his division in electricity to the Pan American 
exposition during the coming summer, The party 
will consist of eleven members and will make a study 
of the subject of electricity. They will visit the gen- 
eral electric works at Schnectady, and also the gen- 
erating works at Niagara Falls. 

Ex-'Ol . — A very interesting letter has been received 
by a college friend from William B. Rogers, who 
is a member of the 15th Reg't and who is now serv- 
ing in the Philippine Islands. Mr. Rogers served in 
China during the late troubles with that Empire and 
left there on the 28th of Nov. last and arrived at 
Manila Dec. 25th, since which date he has been 
serving with his regiment in the mountains and is now 
stationed at Segaspi. The letter gives a very inter- 
esting account of the way in which the fighting is car- 
ried on and also of the manners and customs of the 
people. It seems that the troops have great contempt 
for the fighting qualities of the " insects " as the na- 
tives are called, although it seems very hard to cap- 
ture them as they hide in the mountains and fire 
from cover. Mr. Rogers writes further, that the 
greatest excitement is to be had during cock fights 
and on pay day. 

Oepar-trnf n't* ^ot^s. 



The latest addition to the series of crayon portraits 
of the noted chemists of recent years now being placed 
in the Chemical Lecture Room is that of Dr. C. 
A. Goessmann. By his valuable researches along the 
line of agricultural chemistry and especially in fertiliz- 



176 



AGGIE LIFE. 



ers, at a time when the subject was a new and unde- 
veloped one, Dr. Goessmann has most certainly 
earned a right to a place among the foremost chemi- 
cal students of the day. The portait is an enlarge- 
ment of a photograph taken just before the Doctor's 
European visit, and is pronounced an excellent likeness. 

LIBRARY. 

Landscape Gardening, by F. A. Waugh, professor of 
horticulture at the University of Vermont, This is a 
treatise on the general principles governing out door 
art, with sundry suggestions for their applications in 
the common problems of gardening. Illustrated. 

Hedges, Windbreaks, Shelters and Line Fences, by 
E. P. Powell. A treatise on the planting, growth and 
management of hedge plants for country and suburban 
homes. Illustrated. 

Cauliflower and Allied Vegetables, by C. L. Allen. 
This book explains the principles and practice of cer- 
tain rules equally useful in every field, no matter what 
the crop may be, or to what extent grown. Illustrated. 

Hemp, by S. S. Boyce. A practical treatise on the 
culture of hemp for seed and fiber, with a sketch of 
the history and nature of the hemp plant. Illustrated. 

Alfalfa, by F. D. Coburn, secretary of the Kansas 
department of Agriculture. A volume of practical 
information on the production of Alfalfa, its qualities, 
worth and uses, especially in the United States and 
Canada. The authors object is to give a wider knowl- 
edge of the worth and way of the plant, and to encour- 
age its more extended propagation. Illustrated. 

Plums and Plum Culture, by F. A. Waugh. A mon- 
ograph of the plum, cultivated and indigenous in North 
America. With a complete account of their propa- 
gation, cultivation and utilization. The book describes 
the pomological importance of each group, its botanical 
position, probable origin, character and hardiness. 

Structures and Functions of Bacteria, by Alfred 
Fischer, professor of Botany at the University of 
Leipzic, translated into English by A. C. Jones. 
This volume contains the course of lectures delivered 
for some years to students of biology, pharmacy, and 
agriculture. It gives a survey of the innumerable 
special researches, and indicates in broad outlines the 
present position and extent of bacteriological science. 
It points out and emphasizes the advancement that 
general physiology has received from bacteriological 



investigations, and that bacteria has been removed 
from the isolated position to ^vhich their morphological 
and physiological peculiarities has placed them, also 
indicating their relations to other organisms. 

The First Century of the History of Springfield, 
with an historical review and biographical mention of 
the founders, by Henry M. Burt. The complete work 
comprises two volumes, containing together over 
twelve hundred pages. It gives a brief review of 
some of the leading events, and a chronological sum- 
mary from which dates of occurrences can be readily 
obtained. The official records in the book have been 
followed literally in orthography, punctuation and capi- 
talization. The second volume contains numerous 
specimens of various handwriting found in the town 
records, and of seventy autographs. The individual 
characters of the writers and of their degree of train- 
ing in penmanship are revealed in these as they could 
be in no other way. There are facsimiles of two 
interesting papers in the vigorous handwriting of 
Deacon Samuel Chapin. One is a deed dated May 
21, 1667. 

Industrial Social Organism, by J. C. Van Marten. 

Histories of the towns of Danvers and Haverhill, 
have been recently added to the collection of town 
histories. 

ZOOLOGICAL. 

One of the rattle snakes, crotolus horridus, presented 
to the museum of the Zoological department was 
found dead in its cage last Friday morning. It meas- 
ured three feet, six and three-quarter inches in length 
and had eight rattles. The pair of which the above 
was one, were captured last fall in Portland, Conn. 



DRAWING AND BLUE PROCESS PAPERS, 

SCALES, ANGLES, CURVES and T SQUARES, 

ARCHITECTS' AND DRAFTMEN'S COLORS, 

SCHOOL BOXES WATER COLORS, 



INCORPORATED, 

82 and 84 Washington St., "I TjnQTnw 
216 and 218 Clarendon St., j ^^^^^^^• 



Factories, MALDEN, MASS. 



aU'Urlii, JLii^'i^. 



The mink shot by Senior Wilson has been mounted 
and added to the collection in the museum. 

A garter snake, a spread adder, a horned toad, and 
a chameleon have been recently added to the collec- 
tion of live curiosities. 



I nt^rcollf ^ia-te. 



The faculty of Indiana university at Bloomington 
has taken a decisive stand against class " scraps,'' 
and has probably succeeded in breaking up the annual 
freshm.en-sophomore struggle, which takes place on 
February 22. Only a few students participated in the 
"scrap" of last February. At the beginning of this term 
the faculty decided that those students, 12 in number, 
should be deprived of their credits for the preceding 
term's work. 

The following are the scores of some of the most 
important base ball games: Princeton 12, Holy Cross 
4; Brown 5, Dartmouth ; Yale 12, University of 
Michigan 3 ; Williams 2, Wesleyan 1 ; Amherst 7, 
Tufts ; Brown 9, Michigan 8 ; Trinity 3, M. A. C.2. 

TO THE DEAF. 

A rich lady, cured of her Deafness and Noises in 
the Head by Dr. Nicholson's Artificial Ear Drums, 
gave $10,000 to his Institute, so that deaf people un- 
able to procure the Ear Drums may have them free. 
Address No. 4951c The Nicholson Institute, 780 
Eighth Avenue, New York, U. S. A. 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without c harg e, in the 

Scieniific JImericaii. 

A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation of any scientific journal. Terms, $3 a 
year ; four months, $1. Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN &Co.36iB'oadway, New York 

Branch Office, 625 F St., Washington, D. C. 




JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 

Fine Watch-work a Specialty. 



Second door south of Post Office. 



Livery, Hack, Feed and EKclange Stable. 

Hacks to and from all trains. Special attention given to 
Weddings, Funerals and Parties. Sleighs and Wagons for sale. 
Pleasant St. and Printing House Square, Amherst, Mass. 
Tel. 16.4. 



C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 

E. N. BKOWIsr, D. D. S. 



DENTISTS. 



Cutler's Block, 



Amherst, Mass 



Office Hours : » a. m. to 5 f. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 

OFFICE OF 

B. H. WILLIAMS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 

Office, Cook's Block, Amberst, Mass. 

STUDENTS can buy at fair prices 



FINE READY-MADE SUITS. 



Suits as low as $12. Trousers as low as $3.50. 
Overcoats as low as $10. 



SANDERSON h THOMPSON 



aGGIK L.TFE. 



''Im. 



SOLE AGENT VOU 

THE V/ORLD'S BEST. 



It^ 




S3.50. 



OFTEN IMITATED, 
NEVER EQUALED* 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

FOOT BALL, BASE BALL, 
BICYCLE AND TENNIS SHOES. 



Suits to order from $13.00 up. Suits pressed 50 cts. 

Pants pressed 20 cts. 

Remember these suits axe. pressed not sponged or burned. 

POWERS THE TAILOR. 

Repairing, Cleaning and Altering promptly done. 

Ladies' Coats made and altered. 

Gentlemen's own goods made and trimmed in the latest style. 



Kellogg's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



J. H. Tt^OTT, 

Plumber, Steam arid Gas Fitter. 
OEJLEB IN STOVES BND BBNliES. 

AGENT FOR THE CELEBRATED 

Gurney Steam and Hot Water Heaters. 

Telephone 56-4. 



C R. EL 

All kinds of 

HEATING, mmWy AND GAS WORK. 

HUNT'S BLOCK, AMHERST. 



Lovelly 

The Photographer y 

To the classes of '97, '98 and '99 M. A. C. MAKES A 
SPECIALTY OF COLLEGE WORK. 



Class a7id Athletic Groups, &c. 

Hand Cameras and Supplies in stock, and always fresh. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



S. A. PHILLIPS, 
STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A LARGE STOCK OF 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



AMHa$-r, Aa$$. 




VOL. XI. 



AMHERST, MASS., JUNE 18, 1901, 



NO. 14 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will be sent 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

HOWARD LA WTON KNIGHT, 1902, Editor-in-Chief. 

LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, 1902, Business Manager. 

WILLIAM ETHERINGTON ALLEN, 1903, Assistant Business Manager. 
VICTOR ADOLPH GATES, 1902, Athletics. CHARLES MILTON KINNEY, 1902, Exchanges. 

RICHARD HENDRIC ROBERTSON, 1903, Department Notes. CLAUDE ISAAC LEWIS, 1902. 

NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN. 1903, College Notes. MYRON HOWARD WEST, 1903, Alumni Notes. 

FAYETTE DICKINSON COUDEN, 1904. ARTHUR LEE PECK, 1904. 

Terms: $1.00 per year in adoance. Single Copies, 10c. Pobt&ge outside oi United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot- Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 
Reading-Room Association, 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

D. N. WEST, Pres. Athletic Association, 

V. A. Gates, Manager. Base- Ball Association, 

J. H. Chickering, Sec. Nineteen Hundred and Three Index, 

V. A. Gates, Sec. Fraternity Conference, 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec 
C. L. Rice, Manager. 
G. L. Barrus, Manager. 
C. E. Gordon, Sec. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



rials. 



Again the college year has run its course, and 
Commencement joys and Commencement sorrows 
press upon us. Surely no other season can compare 
with this. For the alumnus, glad reunions, too soon 
changed into hasty partings ; for the undergraduate, 
eagerly-awaited promotions, thoughts of vacation joys, 
a glad farewell to study for happy months ; for the 
Senior, regret at leaving the old familiar haunts 
anxiety for the unknown Future, pleasant memories 
of the happy past ; all these mingled together on the 
dear old campus under the clear June sky. Students, 
alumni and friends, we bid you all our most cordial 
welcome to our Commencement. 



Most of the undergraduates are looking expectant- 
ly forward in the hope of greeting a large entering 
class next fall. There seems to be considerable 
ground for their hopes. The college authorities have, 
it is true, maintained their usual inactivity. One 
would suppose that the question of growth, vital as it 



is, was one of the last to commend itself to our trus- 
tees. The alumni, however, have taken the matter 
in hand, and their committee has done most credit- 
able work in advertising the college. The result is a 
lively curiosity aroused in sections where the college 
was previously unknown and an increased interes, 
all over the state. Just how large the results, as 
measured by increased membership, will be is uncer- 
tain. We must not expect too much. The com- 
bined handicap of ignorance of our existence, preju- 
dice at our name, and misunderstanding of our work 
is too serious to be removed at a single blow. The 
present policy of liberal advertising must be continued 
year after year to give lasting results. It ought to be 
understood too that the work of such a committee 
must needs be limited. Contributing cash to the 
fund and sending in addresses of our friends are ex- 
cellent ways of assistance, but they are not enough. 
Personal work is what must be depended upon. Let 
each student and each alumnus but succeed in bring- 
ing to the college one new man next fall, and our 
most serious problems will be solved very easily. 



178 



AGGIE LIFE, 



It was the misfortune of our baseball team to lose 
mainly at the end of its season's play. As events 
nearly always overshadow those of the distant past 
and as it seems to be more nearly according to human 
nature to condemn than to uphold, we fear that our 
team has been receiving of late more than its just 
share of blame. The outcome of the Vermont trip 
was not perhaps as favorable as we had hoped ; yet to 
severely condemn because of two games lost by nar- 
row margins and to forget the victories that had pre- 
ceded is clearly an injustice. It ought to be remem- 
bered that a long and tiresome trip must be a severe 
test for any team, and it is not strange that its form 
may not be of the best at such times. Our schedule 
has been a hard one, far more difficult than any pre- 
ceding. Various mishaps have weakened the team 
at critical periods. The discipline has not always 
been of the best. Yet in spite of obstacles, the team 
has won seven games out of eleven, among them 
Amherst, Vermont, Maine and Middlebury and has 
lost to Trinity by the barest possible margin. Bear- 
ing these facts in mind we believe that the baseball 
team of the past season has to its credit the best rec- 
ord in the history of the college. 



When the College Senate reorganized last year it 
was hoped that it might become an active power of 
considerable value in our college life. That the first 
Senate failed because it attempted too much, none 
will deny. Yet the need of some organized body 
which shall act as a committee of the students on 
matters of college custom is sorely felt. A number 
of vital questions are now demanding our attention. 
For instance, there is the campus rush. It is held 
every year as a mere matter of tradition, but we do 
not believe that college sentiment really favors it. 
The objection is not that it is dangerous. It is very 
doubtful if it can be called so, considering the small 
number engaging in it and the short space of time 
during which it is kept up. Certainly the risk is not 
very great. But the fault lies in the fact that it set- 
tles nothing. There is no way to decide a winner and 
no decision if one is given is ever accepted as satis- 
factory. For the last three years it has been an 
absolute farce. Why keep up a custom that is both 
undecisive and useless ? We suspect there is but one 
reason. Nobody has ever thought it is duty to con- 



sider it, and consequently it has drifted along. We 
think it is the duty of the Senate to consider it. 
Then there is the college yell. The students who 
favored a change of name of the Life, and it will be 
remembered that two-thirds of the students did desire 
a change, must be equally dissatisfied with the yell. 
Why keep the old yell if it has become unsatisfactory ? 
Let the Senate consider the matter and report its 
decision to the student body in mass- meeting. Again, 
there is the ever-vexatious question of college singing. 
There is plenty of material, there is a desire for more 
real college life ; yet everyone waits. If college sing- 
ing could be once well-started, there is not the slight- 
est doubt that it would be continued as a recognized 
college custom. Why cannot the Senate at least 
attempt to institute such a custom ? The Senate 
might also nominate leaders of the cheering at our 
athletic games. It might take charge of celebrations. 
Had some responsible person been in charge the night 
of the Vermont celebration, the unfortunate cannon 
accident would never have occurred. There is no 
need for the Senate to fail because there is nothing 
to keep it alive. It has the best of opportunities. 
Let us hope that it will make the most of them. 



At the risk of wearying our readers with what is 
already too familiar, we desire at this time to set 
forth as briefly as may be some of the most pressing 
needs of the college from the standpoint of the under- 
graduate. We refer to them constantly because they 
are constantly in our thoughts ; they represent what is 
always present in our minds. First and foremost 
comes the athletic field. Of late we have said little 
of this, yet be assured that we have not forgotten it. 
How can we, when every heavy tax upon the slender 
purses of the student body clearly points to this, the 
only logical solution of our needs? How can we, 
when every visiting team marvels at our absolute lack 
of accommodations? How can we, when every 
would be track athlete has to travel miles and then 
find an opportunity for training only through the good 
will of another college ? The athletic field is by all 
means our most serious problem. Hitherto we have 
waited, and waited, and waited; and now something 
like fifteen years after the agitation began we find 
ourselves still forced to play our games on an open 
field, and dispense with our track team altogether. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



175 



What have we gained? We are very likely impa- 
tient ; yet is it to be wondered at that we lose heart 
when year after year we have the same promises, 
arouse the same enthusiasm, and then see the same 
inactivity? We do not doubt that some time our 
desires will be granted ; but what are we waiting for ? 
We have heard promises in plenty; why can we not 
have action? Of the need of more students we have 
already spoken at length. Once again we thank the 
alumni for their generous response to the advertising 
work of the year ; we sincerely hope that they will but 
be able to continue it. We still have hope too that 
sometime the college itself will awake. What a deal 
of good an attractive catalogue might do 1 What ex- 
penditure of money, too, would give a better return 
than thorough, business-like advertising ? The old 
question of junior electives too comes up for solution. 
It is another of our problems that will never be settled 
till it is settled in the right way. Here again we have 
promises, here again everyone admits the justice of 
our demands; but still the question is "When?" 
And in the meantime classes continue to waste 
precious hours on studies for which they have no use, 
from which they obtain nothing of value, while pre- 
vented from studying deeply into lines in which they 
are genuinely interested. Of the need for a new 
boarding-house, it is probably unnecessary to speak. 
Here the students feel that everything possible is be- 
ing done, and accordingly they do not criticize. One 
minor need which is still keenly felt is the need of a 
college song. We feel sure that all who attend our 
commencemeet, our athletic games, our celebrations, 
or, in fact, any of our gatherings, will admit this with- 
out further argument. We admit that the students 
are not without blame for neglecting to provide a good 
college song. At the same time it is the old case of 
'' everybody's business being nobody's business." We 
believe if some alumnus or other friend of the college 
were to offer a prize of even a small sum for a suita- 
ble song, that we should not long be without one. Or 
what better gift could a class make than a small sum 
each year to be expended either in this way or in 
compiling a college songbook ? Whoever will do this 
will prove himself a true friend of the college. In 
presenting these several needs to our readers, we de- 
sire it understood that we are working first and last 
for the best interests of our college. We have no 



desire to even appear to " dictate " to the trustees, 
the faculty or the alumni. But the student-body 
cannot help seeing these things, and they cannot help 
regretting that they are not otherwise. As the ser- 
vants of the student-body, the Life board would be 
shrinking from its responsibility if it saw these things, 
and, seeing them, let them drift along without com- 
ment. 



REVIEW OF THE YEAR. 

The last college year has been marked by no radical 
changes but represents a season of quiet, continuous 
growth. The entering class numbered thirty-eight and 
the entire registration showed a slight increase over 
the last few years. The greatest gain was in the grad- 
uate department where new courses were offered and 
special facilities for research work enjoyed. Few 
changes were made in the Faculty, Mr. Geo. F. Babb 
being appointed instructor in French, and the fellow- 
ship in Chemistry being awarded to Mr- George F. 
Parmenter. German was added to the required list in 
the Sophomore year, and Geology to the Junior year. 
Admission requirements have been raised by the 
addition of the whole of Plane Geometry and the sub- 
stitution of General History for American History. 
The plan of entrance on certificate was again followed 
with satisfactory results. The 10 per cent, system 
was also confined and seems to have solved the vexa- 
tions problem of absences. The college year has been 
divided into two semesters instead of three terms, and 
it is expected that the change will prove more 
convenient, 

A policy of more liberal advertising of the short 
winter courses was pursued and the result was signifi- 
cant. Over thirty men were enrolled, more than 
double the number for any previous year. Since a 
number of these now plan to enter the Freshman class 
next fall the gain to the institution is evident. 

The College was fairly successful in its requests 
from the Legislature, An appropriation was received 
for repainting the wooden buildings, making various 
repairs and renovating the chemical department. After 
the visit of the Legislative committees, a bill was 
introduced providing for an appropriation for the band- 
This has passed both the House and at the time of 
writing awaits the signature of the Governor. The 
measure in which the students were most interested. 



i86 



AGGIE LIFE 



the building of a new boarding house was however 
forced to be abandoned. There is reason to believe 
that it will be successful next fall. 
r The athletics of the past year show a marked gain in 
most respects. Last fall, the football team played the 
hardest schedule ever presented to us with creditable 
results. The baseball team has shown itself the best 
in the history of the college, making for itself a good 
showing against strong teams this season. In compar- 
ing the results of this year's work with that of previous 
years, it must be remembered that the grade of the 
teams played has been constantly getting higher. 
Three years ago it would have been impossible to 
arrange games with teams played at the present time- 
This of itself proves the increased standing of the col- 
lege in athletic circles. The athletic management of 
the year has been of the best. It has shown itself 
competent, earnest and pains-taking, and deserves 
special commendation. To it much of the year's suc- 
cess has undoubtedly been due. The one disappoint- 
ing feature of our athletics in the failure to organize a 
track-team. It is to be hoped that this will be remedied 
next year. 

The social life of the year is also fairly satisfactory. 
The Proms, have been carefully arranged, well attended 
and a source of much enjoyment to all. The need of 
other social gatherings of a more informal nature has 
been sorely felt, and the Fraternity Conference in 
cooperation with the ladies of the faculty arranged two 
very very successful socials in the Chapel. Probably 
complete social successes cannot be expected until we 
have fraternity houses, but certainly there is already 
some improvement. The fraternities report a pros- 
perous year. The system of withholding pledges till 
the opening of the winter term was given a second 
trial, and again proved itself far superior to the old 
methods. 

The reading-room opened the year with a newly 
papered and refurnished room. Its record for the year 
is good. The Boarding-Club while sadly in need of a 
new building has been well patronized and fairly suc- 
cessful. The Y. M. C. A. gave its usual reception to 
the incoming class and has pursued its customary work. 
Its Handbook was better than usual. It has received 
new strength from the Freshman Class and appears to 
be flourishing. The Senate on the other hand, though 
reorganized early in the year and promising much, was 



conspicuous only by its insignificance. The choir and 
glee club probably did as well as usual. 

After remaining dormant foe two seasons, the 
Natural History Society was revived. Several field 
excursions were taken, and a series of instructive 
lectures was given under its auspices during the winter 
term. The Chemical Club also arranged for a series 
of lectures, which were of much value and interest to 
those who attended, A new organization, the Forensic 
Club, did considerable work during the winter along the 
line of debating. 

The military department deserves special mention. 
Marked improvement and incrseaed interest is evident. 
In the fall the batallion entered several political parades 
where they attracted much attention and were the 
object of many flattering remarks. Artillery practice 
was given once more, considerable attention paid to 
target practice, and- bayonet exercise added to the 
winter's drill. The most marked gain has been in the 
formation of a cadet band. By dint of steady practice 
and hard work, the band has now attained an extremely 
high state of proficiency. Very enjoyable concerts have 
been given each week on the campus, and the band 
has been no small factor at the home games this season. 
We are expecting much from the band next year. 

Perhaps no movement of late has been followed by 
the student body with more interest than the work of 
the alumni advertising committee. It is hoped that a 
good sized class will enter next year and the prospects 
seem to indicate that our hopes will at last be realized. 
Certainly the interest was never more keen. Every 
indication points to a large attendance and a prosper- 
ous year. 



ANNUAL FRESHMAN BANQUET. 

The " Class of 1904" held their first banquet at 
Cooley's Hotel in Springfield on Freshman night which 
this year came of June 14. A good share of the class 
were present, about twenty-five members answering to 
their names at roll-call. The party strung into Spring- 
field in small groups all through the afternoon and 
evening and gathered in the hotel office. About 
eleven o'clock they proceeded in a body to the banquet 
hall where they sat down to enjoy what will be remem- 
bered as one of the pleasantest events of the college 
course. 

The formality characteristic of the first few courses 



AGGIE LIFE. 



i8i 



soon gave place to those feelings of fellowship and 
good humor which are bound to prevail on such an 
occasion and jokes and small talk went the rounds. 

It was about 12-30 when the mienu was completed 
and Toastmaster Griffin arose to introduce the first 
speaker. For the next two hours the laughter and 
enthusiastic applause which greeted the remarks of 
several speakers testified to the enjoyment of the 
toasts, as well as to the patriotism of the class, and 
their readiness for their duties which will fall to them 
as sophomores during the coming year. The past, 
present, and future of the class were discussed at 
length by Messrs. Newton, Kelliher, Cummings and 
Gregg, and toasts of a more humorous turn were re- 
sponded to by Messrs. Gay, Raymoth, Couden, and 
Hill. The roasts on individuals were many but every- 
thing was taken in the kindly way that prevailed 
throughout the evening, Singing and cheering during 
the intermissions between the speaking helped to 
make things lively. The different toasts were as 
follows : 

TOASTS. 

" He who hath a merry heart hath a continual feast." 

Toastmaster, C. H. Griffin. 

H. D. Newton, Our Class 

" Our constant boast ; none come before the only class, 'tis '04." 
J. Kelliher, "To do or not to do " 

" Of making many books there is no end ; and much study is a weariness 

to the flesh." 
R. P. Gay, Our Little Minister 

R. R. Raymoth, Fat 

" A babe in the house is a wellspring of pleasure." 

J. Cummings, Athletics 

F. D. Couden. The Root of all Evils 

" For what is worth anything, 

But so much money as it will bring." 

L. W. B. Hill, The Adventures of a Prof. 

J. W. Gregg, Prospects 

" The distant but still uncloudedfvale wherein our future lies." 

The programme having been completed, several 
extemporaneous speeches were listened to and then the 
gathering broke up, all joining in congratulating the 
committee on the arrangements which had provided 
for a night of so much jollity and enthusiam. 

Much credit is due the management of the hotel 
for the manner in which the supper was served and 
for the excellence of arrangement which marked the 
whole occasion. 



Western Reserve University has recently received 
gifts to the amount of $100,000. 



THIRTY-FIRST COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM. 
Sunday, June 16th. 
Baccalaureate Sermon by Dr. C. S. Walker, 10-45 

A. M. 

Monday. June 17th. 

The Flint Prize Oratorical Contest, Junior class, 
3-30 p. M. Speakers : Mr. Dacy, Mr. Hall, Mr. 
Knight, Mr. Lewis, Mr. Morse and Mr. West. 

The Burham Prize Speaking, Freshman and Sopho- 
more classes, 8 p. m. Speakers : Sophomores, Mr. 
Franklin, Mr. Peebles, Mr. Proulx, Mr. Webster ; 
Freshmen, Mr. Couden, Mr. Gregg, Mr. Griffin and 
Mr. Raymoth. 

Tuesday, June i8th. 

Alumni Meeting in the Mathematical Room, 9 a.m. 

Annual Meeting of the Trustees at the office of the 
Hatch Experiment Station 9-30 A. m. 

Meeting of the committee on Experiment Depart- 
ment, at the office of the Hatch Experiment Station, 
11-30 A. M. 

Class Day exercises, 1-30 p. m. Speakers: Mr. 
Barry, Mr. Dawson, Mr. Gordon, Mr. Rice, Mr. Todd 
Mr. Whitman. Battalion parade, battalion drill, 4 p. m. 
Suppers of the various classes, 6 p. m. Reception by 
President and Trustees, 8 to 10 p. m. Senior Prom- 
enade in Drill Hall, 10 p. m. 

Wednesday, June I 9th. 
Graduation Exercises, Annoucement of Prizes, and 

Conferring of Degrees. 10 a. m. Commencement 

speakers : Mr. Chickering, Mr. Gamwell, Mr. Gordon, 

Mr. Hunting, Mr. Macomber and Mr. Wilson. 

Alumni Dinner, immediately following the graduation 

exercises. 

Thursday and Friday, June 20th and 21st, 
Examination of candidates for admission at the 

Botanic Museum, 9 a. m. Two days are required for 

examination. 



PROGRAMMES. 

THE FLINT PRIZE EXHIBITION IN ORATORY. 

Monday June 17, 1901. 

Music. 

Claude Isaac Lewis, Unionville 

Municipal Government. 



X82 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Howard Lawton Knight, Gardner 

Centralization. 

David Nelson West, Northampton 

The Constitution and the Voter. 

Music. 

Ransom Wesley Morse, Belchertown 

Modern Oppression. 
John Clifford Hall, Sudbury 

A Plea for the American Farmer. 

Arthur Lincoln Dacy, Boston 

So Brothers Be. 



THE BURNHAM PRIZE SPEAKING. 

Monday, June 17, 1901. 

Music. 

Freshmen. 

John William Gregg, South Natick 

Treason of Benedict Arnold, — Grady. 
Reuben Raymond Raymoth, Goshen 

Prohibition in Atlanta, — Grady. 
Clarence Herbert Griffin, Winthrop 

Centralization in America, — Grady. 

Fayette Dickinson Couden, Amherst 

General Grant, — DoUiver. 

Music. 

Sophomores. 

Edward George Proulx, Hatfield 

" Vox Populi — Vox Dei !" — Lovejoy. 
William Warrington Peebles, Washington, D. C 

Address to Harvard Alumni, — B. T. Washington. 
Frank Wallace Webster, Bay State 

Anne Boleyn, — 

Harry James Franklin, Bernardston 

Queen Vashti, — Talmage. 



PROGRAM OF CLASS DAY EXERCISES. 

Planting of Class Ivy, Pres. Gamwell 

Prayer, Rev. C. S. Walker 

Ivy Poem, C. E. Goadon 

Class Oration, J. E. Barry 

Class Song, C. L. Rice 

Class Poem, C. L. Rice 

Campus Oration, W. A. Dawson 



Pipe Oration, 
Hatchet Oration, 



N. P. Whitman 
J. H. Todd 



COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES. 

Wednesday June 19, 1901. 

Music. 

Prayer. 

A Need of the Hour, Nathan Justus Hunting 

Clay, Ernest Leslie Macomber 

The Negro Problem, Edward Stephen Gamwell 

Music. 

America's Opportunity, Alexander Cavassa Wilson 

Growth, James Henry Chickering 

Discipline, Clarence Everett Gordon 

Presentation of Diplomas. 

Announcement of Prizes. 



REVIEW OF THE BASEBALL SEASON. 

The baseball schedule of this spring was one of the 
best and hardest that we have had ; it consisted of 
sixteen games, four of which were not played on 
account of rain. Three practice games were also 
arranged, one not being played on account of rain. 

The season opened with two practice games with 
Amherst, the first we lost by a score of 5 to 2, the 
second we won by a score of 2 to 0, the third game 
was cancelled on account of rain. Then came our 
four home games all of which we won : Storrs 2 to 
our 1 1, Maine 9 to our 13, University of Vermont 9 
to our 10, and Middlebury 3 to our 4. The game 
with Wesleyan being cancelled on account of rain, 
our first game away from home was with Trinity at 
Hartford, the latter winning by a score of 3 to 2. 
The game was exciting throughout and not until the 
ninth inning with two men out did Trinity bring in the 
winning run. Then came our annual Vermont trip 
which did not turn out quite to our satisfaction, 
though, considering the disadvantages undergone by a 
team travelling away from home for any length of 
time, winning half the games played is not so bad. 
The game with Vermont Academy was one-sided, 
the score being 18 to in our favor, and only five 
innings being played. Although we were defeated by 
Middlebury and Vermont, both games were close and 
exciting, the former was 9 to our 6, the latter was 7 



AGGIE LIFE. 



183 



to our 6. The last game of the trip and also of the 
season was played with the Millers Falls team Satur- 
day, June 8. The latter were defeated in a very 
clean game by a score of 2 to 1 . 

The season as a whole was successful, though the 
Vermont trip was a trifle disappointing. The team is 
to be congratulated on its good work and also the 
manager to whom much credit is due for his con- 
scientious work and careful management. 



©lie* 



— The Seniors have chosen Lovell as class 
photographer. 

— The ball game with Connecticut State college has 
been cancelled. 

— Rear Admiral Cautz U. S. N. has been spending 
the last few days in town. 

— W. A. Dawson 1901 spent his Senior vacation 
at his home in Worcester. 

— The Northampton band will give a concert in 
Amherst sometime this week. 

— C. T. Leslie and J. H. Todd spent last week at 
the home of the former in Pittsfield. 

— The college band gave one of the best concerts 
of the season on the campus last evening. 

— The entrance examinations will be held at the 
Botanic Museum next Thursday and Friday. 

- — M. F. Ahearn who was injured in the ball game 
with Univ. of Maine has not yet fully recovered. 

— Capt. Z. W. Toney, U. S. A., present recruiting 
officer at Springfield will probably visit the college 
this week. 

— C. A. Tinker who has recently returned from 
Buffalo speaks very highly of the Pan-American 
exposition. 

— The class of 1901 will hold their parting banquet 
at the Norwood, Northampton, on the evening of 
June 19th. 

— It is rumored that already almost one hundred 
persons have expressed their intention of entering this 
college next fall. 

— L. B. Haskell, 1904, who has been home most 
of the term has returned to take the final examina- 
tions with his class. 



— A large number of town people as well as college 
men enjoyed the concert given by the band on the 
evening of June 5th. 

— The annual mountain day was observed by the 
class of 1904 on the 7th. by a trip to Mt. Tom and 
vicinity. Prof. R. E. Smith had charge of the party. 

— A party of Seniors, consisting of Rice, Casey, 
Barry, Smith and Gordon, went fishing one evening 
last week, and succeeded in capturing twenty-six 
handsome trout. 

— Both houses of the legislature have passed the 
bill calling for four hundred ($400) dollars with which 
to equip the band. The bill now awaits the signature 
of the governor. 

— Much credit is due to the committee which dec- 
orated the Drill hall for the Senior prom. The deco- 
rations are much better than last year. E. S. Gam- 
well had charge of the work. 

— The college Y. M. C. A. have published a very 
tasty " Hand Book " for the use of the students 
This year the book is better gotten up and contains 
more information than formerly. 

— Capt. J. A. Anderson delivered an address in Wor- 
cester last evening. The occasion being the annual 
reunion of the regiment in which the captain served 
during the civil war, the 57th Mass. 

— The commandant has decided that should the 
cadets agree to the change that the regulation m.ilitary 
cap such as are now being used by our band, will be 
substituted in place of the old cadet caps. 

— Col. Charles Morris, U. S. A., will review the 
battalion and present the military diplomas at 4 o'clock 
this afternoon. Col. Morris was formally military 
instructor at this college at that time holding the rank 
of lieutenant. 

— Captain A. L. Anderson, U. S. A., recently in- 
spected the military department of the college. The 
captain seemed much pleased both with the drill and 
the condition of the equipments. Capt. Anderson 
spent several days in Amherst. 

— The class of 1903 have elected the following 
officers to serve during the fall semester of 1901-02 : 
Pres., E. B. Snell ; vice-pres., L. C. Bacon ; sec. 
and treas., G. D. Jones ; class captain, G. D. Barrus ; 
seargent-at-arms, W. W. Peebles. 



i84 



AGGIE LIFE. 



C J^ox^s 



AcGiE, 16 ; Vermont Academy, 0. 
On Tuesday June 4, Aggie defeated Vermont Acad- 
emy in a one-sided game by a score of 18 to 0. The 
academy team was completely out-classed and game 
was called at end of fifth inning. Bowler pitched for 
Aggie and was very effective allowing only three hits 
and giving no bases on balls. Vermont tried all her 
pitchers but Aggie had no trouble in finding the ball 
and had fifteen hits to her credit. 

MiDDLEBURY, 9 ; Aggie, 6. 
On Wednesday, June 5, Middlebury defeated Ag- 
gie in a rather loose and poorly played game by a 
score of 9 to 6. The errors made on both sides were 
inexcusable and costly, some of them being almost 
ridiculous. At the opening of the ninth inning Mid- 
dlebury had nine runs and Aggie two. Aggie then 
pounded out four runs and got the bases full but Drake 
settled down and retired the next three men in order, 
Score : 

Middlebury, 9 8 7 

Aggie, 6 6 8 

Batteries — Drake. McCuen, Bodfish and Cook. 

U. OF v., 7 ; Aggie, 6. 
The University of Vermont defeated Aggie on 
Thursday, June 5, at Burlington in a close and excit- 
ing game. Aggie took the lead in the first Inning 
and kept it till the eight when by a combination of 
hits and errors Vermont took lead and maintained it 
throughout the game. In the ninth inning both teams 
scored but Vermont was ahead at the end. Robin- 
son's batting was a marked feature of the game. 



Paul, s. s., 
O'Hearn, 2 b., 
Graves, c. f., 
Cummings, 1 b., 
Bodfish, p.. 
Cook, c, 
Pierson, r. f.. 
Bowler, 3 b., 
Halligan, 1. f.. 



Innings. 
Vermont, 
M. A. C, 



123456788 
2 13 1—7 
20000030 1—6 



Total, 



Robinson, I. f., 
Wasson, c, 
Orton, 1 b., 
O'Halloran, c. f., 
Crum, s. s., 
Reed, 3 d., 
Hutchinson, 2 b. 
Kinlock, r. f., 
Fogg, p.. 

Total, 



UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT 



4 


1 


2 






1 
1 


4 
2 
11 


5 
1 
2 




1 
1 








3 


?. 





4 


2 


I 


1 


2 











3 


2 





2 








1 


9 


27 


12 


6 


B.N. 


P.O, 


A. 


E. 


4 

I 



8 




1 


1 

1 


1 


7 








1 


5 





1 


1 


1 


6 


2 





2 


3 





1 


4 


2 


























1 



27 



17 



Two-base hits — Ortoa, Halligan. Base on balls — by Fogg. Struck out— 
by FogS 6, by Bodfish 3. Hit by pitched ball— Cook, Bowler. Wild pitch- 
Fogg. Umpire — Courtney. Time — 1 hr,, 50 m. 

Aggie, 2 ; Millers Falls, 1. 

On Saturday, June 8, Aggie defeated Millers Falls 
team in a well-played game by a score of two to one. 
The game was close and interesting neither side being 
able to score until the seventh inning when Aggie 
scored one run and another in the eighth. Millers 
Falls did not score until the last part of ninth inning, 
when with a hit, an error and a pass ball one man 
scored. Two out when the run was made. The next 
man was fielded out. Score : 

Innings, 123456789 

Aggie, 1 1 0—2 

Millers Falls, 00000000 1 — 1 

Batteries— Bodfish and Cook, Clifford and Sullivan. 

The University of Norwich game which was dated 
for Friday June 7, was cancelled on account of the 
rain. 

■, SUMMARY FOR THE SEASON. 

'i 

PRACTICE GAMES. 

April 1 1— M. A. C. vs. Amherst, 2-5. 
" 18— " " " 2-0. 

SCHEDULED GAMES. 

April 24 — M. A. C. vs. Wesleyan, cancelled on ac- 
count of rain. 

May 4— M. A. C. vs. C. A. C, 11-2. 

May 9 — M. A. C. vs. Middlebury, 4-3. 

May 10 — " vs. Middlebury, cancelled on ac- 

count of rain. 

May 14 — M. A. C. vs. Univ. of Maine, 13-9. 

May 21— M. A. C. vs. Univ. of Vermont, 10-9. 

May 24— M. A. C. vs. Trinity, 2-3. 

June 4 — M. A. C. vs. Vermont Academy, 15-0, 

June 5 — M. A. C. vs. Middlebury, 6-9. 

June 6 — M. A. C. vs. Univ. of Vermont, 6-7. 

June 7 — M. A. C. vs. Norwich Univ., cancelled on 
account of rain. 

June 8— M. A. C. vs. Millers Falls, 2-1. 

June 15— M. A. C. vs. C. A. C. 

Total— Won 7, lost 4. 
The following men will receive the baseball " M " 

for the first time : J. Cummings, N. F. Ahearn, J. W. 

Gregg, C. P. Halligan. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



^85 



PROMOTION. 

Capt. John Anderson announces the following ap- 
pointments in the battalion for next year : 
Cadet First Lieutenant and Adjutant, L. C Claflin. 
Cadet First Lieutenant and Quartermaster, E. B. 

Saunders. 
Cadet Sergeant Major, H. L. Knight. 

COMPANY ROSTERS. 

Co. A. 

Cadet Captain. H. A. Paul. 

" First Lieutenant, R. W. Morse. 
" Second " J. C. Hall. 
" Sergeant, V. A. Gates. 

L. A. Cook. 

C. A. Tinker. 
" H. E. Hodgkiss. 

G. L. Barrus. 
" Corporal, F. D. Couden. 
" " N. F. Monahan. 

" " W. V. Tower. 

W.W.Peebles. 

Co. B. 

Cadet Captain, A. L. Dacy. 

" First Lieutenant, E. F. McCobb. 
" Second " J. M. Dellea. 
" Sergeant, C. E. Dwyer. 

J. H. Belden. 

F. R. Church. 
" " C. \. Lewis. 

H. L. Bodfish. 
" Corporal, W. E. Allen. 

C. M, Kinney. 

E. M. Poole. 

E. B. Snell. 

BAND. 

Leader and Second Lieutenant, M. H. West. 
Leading Musician and First Sergeant, D. N. West. 
Sergeant, S. L. Smith. 
Corporal, F. W. Webster. 
Drum Major, C. P. Halligan. 



READING ROOM ASSOCIATION. 

The retiring management (April, 1900, to April, 
1901) respectfully submit the following report. At 
the beginning of the fall term it was voted by the stu- 
dents to assess a tax of one dollar and seventy-five 
cents ($1.75) on each student to maintain the Read- 
ing Room for the year. The actual receipts and ex- 
penses are as follows : 

RECEIPTS. 

On hand April 1, 1900, $23 87 

Assessments, 122 75 

Sale of Periodicals, 12 33 

Telephone Tolls, 7 08 



Total, 


$166 03 


EXPENSES. 




Subscription Periodicals, 


$70 00 


Amherst " Record," 


1 75 


'• Truth," 


2 08 


Settlement old acct. " Mount Holyoke," 


1 50 


Telephone Service, 


45 69 


Record and Receipt Books, 


2 10 


Paper, Postage and Express, 


3 10 


Chairs. 


3 30 


Baseball Picture, 


1 50 


Letter Box Key, 


25 


Total, 


$162 77 


Balance on hand April 1, 1901, 


$3 26 


C. T. Leslie, 


Treasurer. 


Approved : 




P. B. Hasbrouck, 




H, T. Fernald. 




Depa^r-lirvf r^-f f^o-t^s. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES. 

LIBRARY. 
Sooty Mould of the Orange and its Treatment, 



by 



Herbert J. Webber, assistant in division of vegetable 
physiology and pathology. United States department 
of agriculture. For a number of years sooty mold, a 
fungus disease of the orange and citrous plants, has 
caused considerable damage. Until recently, how- 
ever, the injury done any single grove was usually 



i86 



AGGIE LIFE. 



slight, and little attention was given to the disease . 
In 1891 Professor Underwood published a journal on 
" Diseases of the orange in Florida." He mentioned 
this malady as of slight importance. Within the 
past few years, however, owing to the rapid spread of 
certain insect pests, which the sooty mold follows, the 
disease has been assuming very serious proportions. 
Fifty thousand dollars is considered a low estimate of 
damage done in a single year by this disease. At 
several places throughout the orange region whole 
groves are affected, and frequently hundreds of acres 
of trees in a single locality are literally black with the 
fungus. Sooty mold of the orange is a black fungus 
of considerable botanical interest, belonging to the 
order Pyrenomycetes. The first account of this fun- 
gus was given by Pierson in 1822. The leaves and 
fruits of trees affected with this disease become cov- 
ered with a black, velvety, membranous coating. In 
slight attacks this coating covers only limited spots, 
but in severe cases the greater part of the upper sur- 
face of the leaves, fruits and twigs are covered with a 
continuous membrane, so dense and thick that it may 
be removed from the leaf and torn up like paper. 
The report was printed by the United States depart- 
ment of agriculture as Bulletin, Number 13, of divi- 
sion of vegetable physiology and pathology. The pub- 
lication gives a description of sooty mold, its nature, 
distribution, plants on which the mold occurs in 
Forida, effect on orange trees and fruit, methods of 
preparing for market fruits affected with the disease, 
orange insects which it follows, methods of treating 
trees affected, entomogenous fungi as an aid in com- 
batting the fungus, etc. 

Flora der Umgegend von Drohobycy, by Edward 
Hiickel. Printed in German. 

A Text -book of Zoology, by F. Jeffery Parker, D. 
Sc, F. R. S.. professor of Biology in the University 
of Otago, Dunedin. N. Y., and William A. Haswell, 
M. A., D. Sc, F. R. S., professor of Biology in the 
University of Sydney, N. S. W. The mode of treat- 
ment of the subject is such that no previous knowl- 
edge of Zoology is assumed. The complete work, 
describes, in the majority of cases, in some detail, an 
example of every important class, and, in cases where 
the diversity of organism is very great — two or more 
examples are given. The student is thus furnished 



with a brief account of at least one member of all the 
principal groups of animals. Following the table of 
classification, with its brief definitions comes the 
general account of the group. This is treated accord- 
ing to the comparative method, the leading modifica- 
tions of the various parts and organs being described. 
The description of each group usually ends with some 
account of its ethology and distribution, and with a 
discussion of the affinities and of the mutual relation- 
ships t)f its various sub-divisions. 

EXPERIMENT STATION. 

An interesting and instructive bulletin, No. 73, was 
recently published* by the Experiment Station. It 
tabulates the results of various orchard experiments 
carried on by the Horticultural department last sea- 
son under the supervision of Prof. Maynard and Mr. 
Drew. Last year .the apple crop in the station 
orchards was the largest in their history. Orchard 
No. 1 of 32 trees, planted 15 years ago has been 
kept under thorough cultivation during the whole time. 
Fertilizers were used to keep up a uniform growth of 
6 to 12 inches, the fertilizers varying according to the 
season and the crop produced. One tree, Lawver, 
8 inches in diameter yielded over 4 barrels of choice 
apples. Orchard No. 2, of 57 trees is on rather dry, 
stony land, with a hardpan subsoil, the trees have 
been planted some 15 or 2CT years. Strips of land 
about eight feet wide between the rows were cultivated 
throughout the season, the grass growing along the 
line of the trees was cut twice during the season, and 
allowed to lie on the ground without removal, serving 
as a mulch, and a protection to the fruit falling on the 
ground. Nearly every tree bore a full crop. Orchard 
No. 3, of 28 trees, is on rather moist, stony land, with 
a hardpan subsoil, and has not been cultivated for 15 
years. The grass has been cut twice or more each 
season and left on the ground when cut, or raked 
under the trees. The same fertilizers were applied 
as to Nos. 1 and 2,_ %nd all the trees made a satis- 
factory growth. The trees in all three orchards, ex- 
cept checks, were sprayed with Bordeaux mixture and 
Paris green, three times during the early part of the 
season, and those most subject to the scab were 
sprayed a short time before the fruit was gathered 
with a weak solution of copper sulfate. Most of the 
fruit in the above orchards was thinned when about 



AGGIE LIFE. 



187 



one inch in diameter, checks being left whenever nec- 
essary. Careful records were kept of the cost of 
thinning, and the value of the fruit on the thinned and 
unthinned trees estimated. 

About 40 varieties of peaches fruited during last 
season, and the fruit was of unusual size and quality. 
The varieties showing greatest value were : Mountain 
Rose, St. John, Early Crawford, Old Mixon, Late 
Crawford, Champion and Elberta. 

The plum crop in all parts of the state was the 
largest and best in the history of the fruit, especially 
the varieties, with only one or two trees of each, 
ranging from one to thirty years old. , Nearly all the 
varieties of European plums. The orchards contain a 
large number of varieties fruited. The black knot 
was prevented from injurying the trees by spraying, 
and the brown rot was nearly controlled in the same 
way. 

A convenient calendar is appended to this bulletin 
of various insecticides and fungicides, and the report 
describes the results of the use of those compounds 
on the injurious diseases to which fruits are subject. 
The principal fungicides used during the season were 
the copper sulfate in the form of Bordeaux mixture, 
and a simple solution of copper sulfate and water ; 
but in a few cases a trial of other well-known com- 
bined insecticides and fungicides was made. 



Alu 



rr\r\i. 



'91.— M. A. Carpenter, 103 Belmont St., Cam- 
bridge, Mass, 

'92. — Jewell B. Knight of Belchertown, a gradu- 
ate of the Massachusetts Agricultural College, has been 
honored by an appointment from the British govern- 
ment to go to India and establish an agricultural col- 
lege, Mr, Knight is taking a post-graduate course at 
the agricultural college at Amherst, having graduated 
from that institution about six years ago. He will re- 
ceive the degree of master of arts next week. Mr. 
Knight has to guarantee a three-years' stay in India, 
and will start for that country in a few weeks. He is 
a graduate of the Belchertown high school and has 
taught in that school, also in the district schools, be- 
sides giving private tuition, fitting many pupils for the 
various colleges in the state. Mr, Knight's engage- 



ment has been announced, the marriage to take place 
immediately upon his completion of work at Amherst. 
Ex-'92.— N, P, Davidson, Colonel I, N. G. and 
Superintendent Northwestern Military Academy. 

'93. — E. C. Howard, Principal Center Grammar 
School, Northampton, Mass. 

'94. — Horace P. Smead has recently secured a 
fine position as farm superiatendent in Dorset, Vt. 
The farm contains over 1800 acres and has over 150 
head of stock and is owned by a Mr. DeNotbeck of 
New York city. 

'94. — Charles Leorrett Brown was married to Miss 
Charlotte Eliza Cooper, on Weknesday June 5th, at 
Springfield, Mass. At home after August 1st, on 
Westfield St., Tatham, Mass. 

'95. — Arthur B. Smith married in Chicago May 
29, to Miss Myrtha L. Zeller. At home after Sept. 
5, 544 Winnenac Ave., Ravenswnod, Chicago. 

'95, — An interesting article entitled " Plant Propa- 
gation " appeared in the last issue of the Texan Stock- 
man and Farmer, from the pen of E. A. White, assist- 
ant professor of horticulture at the Texas Agricultural 
and Mechanical College. 

Ex-'95.— Alfred W. Davis, 88 Linden Ave., Flush- 
ing, L. I, 

'97. — It gives us pleasure to announce the mar- 
riage of Mr. Charles Goessmann to Miss Marie 
Dunphy, Wednesday, June 5th, at New York city. 
They will reside in Worcester, Mass. 

'00. — F. Howard Brown is now occupying a farm 
at Marlboro, Mass. 

Ex-"00, — Alfred D. Gill is now in the employ of 
Geo, A. Lowe Co., dealers in wagons and farm 
machinery, Ogden, Utah. 



I n t f r col 1 f ^ i a-t e . 



The Bible College of Springfield is to be removed 
to Hartford. 

The English athletes may train this summer at 
Weston field, Williamstown, 

The total amount of Yale property exempt from 
taxation amounts in value to over seven million dol- 
lars. 



1 88 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Exeter won from Andover 61 to 43 in the annual 
dual track nneet at Andover. Two dual records were 
broken. 

The first issue of the Tufts Engineer, a new maga- 
zine published by the Tufts Engineering society, ap- 
peared last week. 

Richard Sheldon, 1902, of New York city, has 
been elected captain of the Yale University track 
team for next year. 

The Dartmouth baseball team has elected Law- 
rence Delano Varney, 1902, of Dover, N. H., as 
captain for next year. 

A recent issue of the Boston Transcript contains an 
article which is a plea for our college, written by 
Franklin Ware Davis. 

Michigan has again demonstrated her ability in de- 
bate by winning from the University of Pennsylvania 
team in the annual contest. 

Recent ball games : Holy Cross 3, Brown ; 
Brown 4, Harvard 3 ; Yale 9, Carlisle 5 ; Wesleyan 1, 
Amherst ; Amherst 4, Holy Cross 3. 

President Harper of the University of Chicago has 
just announced that the university had begun to estab- 
lish affiliated preparatory schools in different parts of 
Europe. 

Columbia has received $100,000 from an anony- 
mous giver to be devoted to the establishment of a 
chair, for the study and teaching of the Chinese 
language. 

The United States Naval academy won the inter- 
collegiate fencing championship by a single point and 
Cornell was second, Columbia third and Harvard 
fourth. 

There are 700 entries for the intercollegiate track 
games, representing twenty universities and colleges ; 
Harvard has 84, Yale 80, Princeton 69, Pennsylvania 
85, Cornell 94, and Columbia 72. 

On Friday, May 31, and Saturday, June 1, the 
Pan-American intercollegiate athletic championships 
were held on the athletic field of the Stadium on the 
grounds of the Pan-American exposition. 

While Moses was not a college man, 

And never played foot ball, 
On rushes he is said to be 

The first one of them all, — Ex. 



Sir William C. MacDonald, of Montreal, who has 
already given a great deal of money to McGill Uni- 
versity, has just given $150,000, which was used for 
the endowment of the chairs of Botany and Chemis- 
try. 

The month of February was full of interest to the 
Johns Hopkins university. In certain v/ays a critical 
point v/as reached in the fortunes of the institution. 
The most significant event was the presentation of a 
new site for the buildings of the university. Several 
gentlemen of Baltimore have offered a plot of 176 
acres in one of the finest locations in the vicinity for a 
new home. The conditions are that a million dollars 
shall be raised for an endowment fund, to be used 
only for the purpose of instruction. The site offered 
is a beautiful spot diversified with hills and forest, and 
admirably suited for academic purposes. It is also 
of historic interest, 'as the property once belonged to 
Charles Carroll, of Carrollton, and the mansion now 
standing upon it received the name " Homewood" 
from the son of the signer of the Declaration. If the 
million dollars can be raised the Johns Hopkins uni- 
versity will be started on a new career, and the out- 
look is altogether hopeful. 



The Radiator from New Haven is remarkably 
interesting this month. 

The literary part of the Brunonian of Brown Univer- 
sity is especially good this month. 

The Latin and High School Review is quite the 
most pretentions of our High School exchanges. 



1 1^ 



DRAWING AND BLUE PROCESS PAPERS, 

SCALES, ANGLES, CURVES and T SQUARES, 

ARCHITECTS' AND DRAFTMEN'S COLORS, 

SCHOOL BOXES WATER COLORS, 



INCORPORATED, 
82 and 84 Washington St., \ rjncT'nxr 
216 and 218 Clarendon St., l^^^o-^UJ^i- 



Factories, MALDEN, MASS. 



fiUtilfi: LrlFil. 



We beg to remark that the Portland High School 
Racquet has a very artistic drawing on its cover. 

The Vermont Academy Life is excellent as usual. 
The p?iper used in publishing is especially worth noticing. 

The Phoenix of Swarthmore sends an engraving 
of the Hon. J. K. Richards Solicitor General of the 
United States and who was in the class of 75 of that 
college. 



S^t^ 



AMHa$T, AA$$, 




JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 

Fine Watch-work a Specialty. 



Second door south of Post Office. 



Li 



E 



, IIUUIl, 

Hacks to and from all trains. Special attention given to 

Weddings, Funerals and Parties. Sleighs and Wagons for sale. 

Pleasant St. and Printing House Square, Amherst, Mass. 

Tel. 16.4. 



G. S. GAl ES, D. D. S. 

B. N. BKOWIS'^, D. D. S. 



DEINTISTS. 



Cutler's Block, 



Amherst, Mass 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
(julckly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
Invention Is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
Bent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without charge, in the 



A handsomely Illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation of any acientifle journal. Terms, $3 a 
year ; four months, |1. Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN XCo.sB'Broadway, New York 

Branch OfHce, 625 F St., Washington. D. C. 



Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered wlien desired. 

OFFICE OF 

B. H. WILLIAMS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



STUDENTS can buy at fair prices 

Hats, Gaps, Gloves, Gents' Furnisiis, 

FINE READy-mDE SUITS. 



Suits as low as $12. Trousers as low as $3.50. 
Overcoats as low as $10. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



AGGIE LIFE- 



SOLE AGKNT FOR 



THE WORLD'S BEST. 




$3.50. 



OFTEN IMITATED.^ 
NEVER EQUALgp* 



HEADQUARTERS EOR 

FOOT BALL, BASE BALL, 
BICYCLE AND TENNIS SHOES. 



Suits to order from $13.00 up. Suits pressed 50 cts. 

Pants pressed 20 cts. 

Remember these suits &vq pressed not sponged or burned. 

POWERS THE TAILOR. 

Repairing, Cleaning and Altering promptly done. 

Ladies' Coats made and altered. 

Gentlemen's own goods made and trimmed in the latest style. 

Kellogg's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



J. H. Tf^OTT, 

Plumber, Steam and Gas Fitter, 
DEPLEB IN STOVES ID BHNgES. 

AGENT FOK THE CELEBRATED 

Gurney Steam mid Hot Water Heaters. 

Telephone 56-4. 



C. R. EILD 

All kinds of 

HEATING, PLUMBING AND 

HUNT'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST. 



Lovelly 

The Photographer, 

To the classes of '97, '98 and '99 M. A. C. MAKES A 
SPECIALTY OF COLLEGE WORK. 



Class and Athletic Groups, &c. 

Hand Cameras and Supplies in stock, and always fresh. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



S. A. PHILLIPS, 
STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A LARGE STOCK OP 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR FUKNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



M^"^. 



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